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Material culture and consumer society : dependent colonies in colonial Australia /
Mark Staniforth.
imprint
New York : Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2003.
description
xv, 185 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0306473860
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2003.
isbn
0306473860
catalogue key
4784399
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 159-180) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
From the reviews: "Staniforth's work offers particular strengths to those engaged in the study of consumer society and capitalism...this work will remain important as part of the bridge between land and sea." (Stacy C. Kozakavich, Historical Archaeology)
From the reviews:"Staniforth's work offers particular strengths to those engaged in the study of consumer society and capitalism...this work will remain important as part of the bridge between land and sea." (Stacy C. Kozakavich, Historical Archaeology)
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Throughout history, material goods have been valued for more than their usefulness; they have also been symbols of status and wealth. During the colonial period of Australia, material goods took on an even more important role for the new arrivals to the island. Material Culture and Consumer Society argues that material goods were a necessary adjunct to the successful colonization of Australia demonstrating that it was necessary to establish trade networks that provided adequate supplies of culturally 'appropriate' food, drink and other consumer goods for the newly arrived colonists. Material goods were used: * to distinguish the colonists from Indigenous groups ; * to reassure the colonists about their place in the world; * to help establish the colonists' own networks of social relations. Material Culture and Consumer Society contends that the role of consumption and the part played by material goods were more important to the negotiation of social position in the colonies than in the homeland. This work will be of interest to underwater, historical and cultural archaeologists, social historians, cultural heritage managers, and graduate students of these fields.
Main Description
Throughout history, material goods have been valued for more than their usefulness; they have also been symbols of status and wealth. During the colonial period of Australia, material goods took on an even more important role for the new arrivals to the island. Material Culture and Consumer Society argues that material goods were a necessary adjunct to the successful colonization of Australia demonstrating that it was necessary to establish trade networks that provided adequate supplies of culturally 'appropriate' food, drink and other consumer goods for the newly arrived colonists. Material goods were used: to distinguish the colonists from Indigenous groups ; to reassure the colonists about their place in the world; to help establish the colonists' own networks of social relations. Material Culture and Consumer Society contends that the role of consumption and the part played by material goods were more important to the negotiation of social position in the colonies than in the homeland. This work will be of interest to underwater, historical and cultural archaeologists, social historians, cultural heritage managers, and graduate students of these fields.
Main Description
Throughout history, material goods have been valued for more than their usefulness; they have also been symbols of status and wealth. During the colonial period of Australia, material goods took on an even more important role for the new arrivals to the island. Material Culture and Consumer Society argues that material goods were a necessary adjunct to the successful colonization of Australia demonstrating that it was necessary to establish trade networks that provided adequate supplies of culturally 'appropriate' food, drink and other consumer goods for the newly arrived colonists. Material goods were used:* to distinguish the colonists from Indigenous groups ; * to reassure the colonists about their place in the world; * to help establish the colonists' own networks of social relations.Material Culture and Consumer Society contends that the role of consumption and the part played by material goods were more important to the negotiation of social position in the colonies than in the homeland. This work will be of interest to underwater, historical and cultural archaeologists, social historians, cultural heritage managers, and graduate students of these fields.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Overviewp. 1
Immigrant Societiesp. 7
Dependent Coloniesp. 9
The Archaeology of the Eventp. 13
Introductionp. 13
Archaeology, Anthropology, and Historyp. 15
On the Relationships between Things, Words, and Ideasp. 21
The Annales Schoolp. 26
The Archaeology of the Eventp. 28
Capitalism, Colonialism, and Consumerismp. 33
Introductionp. 33
Capitalismp. 34
Colonialismp. 36
Consumerismp. 42
Methods and Sourcesp. 47
Introductionp. 47
Material Culturep. 48
Historical Documentationp. 54
Imagesp. 60
Port Jackson and the Wreck of Sydney Cove (1797)p. 65
Introductionp. 65
Background--Port Jacksonp. 65
Background--Calcuttap. 72
Historical Background--Sydney Covep. 73
The Archaeological Excavation of Sydney Covep. 78
The Cargo of Sydney Covep. 79
The Chinese Export Porcelain Cargo of Sydney Covep. 86
Chinese Export Porcelain in Australiap. 95
Conclusionp. 98
Port Phillip and the Wreck of William Salthouse (1841)p. 101
Introductionp. 101
Background--Port Phillipp. 101
Background--Montrealp. 104
Historical Background--William Salthousep. 105
The Archaeological Excavation of William Salthousep. 109
The Cargo of William Salthousep. 109
Conclusionp. 121
The Swan River Colony and the Wrecks of James Matthews (1841) and Eglinton (1852)p. 125
Introductionp. 125
Background--Swan River Colonyp. 125
Background--Londonp. 127
Historical Background--James Matthewsp. 127
The Archaeological Excavation of James Matthewsp. 130
The Cargo of James Matthewsp. 131
Historical Background--Eglintonp. 135
The Archaeological Excavation of Eglintonp. 137
The Cargo of Eglintonp. 137
Conclusionp. 140
The Meanings of Thingsp. 143
Capitalism, Colonialism, and Consumerismp. 144
Building Construction Materialsp. 146
Alcoholp. 147
Tobaccop. 148
Beveragesp. 148
Personal Hygienep. 149
Conclusionp. 153
Innovations of this Researchp. 155
Referencesp. 159
List of English-Metric Conversionsp. 181
Indexp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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