Catalogue


William III /
Tony Claydon.
imprint
London ; Toronto : Longman, 2002.
description
xxi, 202 p. : maps ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0582405238
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
London ; Toronto : Longman, 2002.
isbn
0582405238
catalogue key
4777373
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 190-196) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Ever since he came to the Stuart throne, William III has been a controversial monarch. Having usurped his uncle in the 'Glorious Revolution', having surrendered the core of monarchical power, having excluded Catholics from political influence, and having engaged his new realms in their first sustained war in Europe for a century, this king has provoked intense reactions and debates. This history offers a full, but succinct, account of William's life and influence. It outlines his career in the Netherlands before he came to the Stuart crown; it describes how a continental objective - the defeat of Louis XIV of France - became his central obsession; and it shows how the new king applied lessons and priorities learned abroad to his rule in London. The book does more than this, however. It argues William was the key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. It suggests that it took someone from beyond the island shores, with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people which had marred the Stuart world. It argues that William was a crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and as a model of open government. Tony Claydon is Senior Lecturer in History, University of Wales, Bangor. He is the author of William III and the Godly Revolution (1996).
Back Cover Copy
Ever since he came to the Stuart throne, William III has been a controversial monarch.  Having usurped his uncle in the 'Glorious Revolution', having surrendered the core of monarchical power, having excluded Catholics from political influence, and having engaged his new realms in their first sustained war in Europe for a century, this king has provoked intense reactions and debates.   This history offers a full, but succinct, account of William's life and influence.  It outlines his career in the Netherlands before he came to the Stuart crown; it describes how a continental objective - the defeat of Louis XIV of France - became his central obsession; and it shows how the new king applied lessons and priorities learned abroad to his rule in London.  The book does more than this, however.  It argues William was the key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland.  It suggests that it took someone from beyond the island shores, with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people which had marred the Stuart world.  It argues that William was a crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and as a model of open government.   Tony Claydon is Senior Lecturer in History, University of Wales, Bangor.  He is the author of William III and the Godly Revolution (1996).
Back Cover Copy
Ever since he came to the Stuart throne, William III has been a controversial monarch. Having usurped his uncle in the 'Glorious Revolution', having surrendered the core of monarchical power, having excluded Catholics from political influence, and having engaged his new realms in their first sustained war in Europe for a century, this king has provoked intense reactions and debates.This history offers a full, but succinct, account of William's life and influence. It outlines his career in the Netherlands before he came to the Stuart crown; it describes how a continental objective - the defeat of Louis XIV of France - became his central obsession; and it shows how the new king applied lessons and priorities learned abroad to his rule in London. The book does more than this, however. It argues William was the key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. It suggests that it took someone from beyond the island shores, with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people which had marred the Stuart world. It argues that William was a crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and as a model of open government.Tony Claydon is Senior Lecturer in History, University of Wales, Bangor. He is the author of William III and the Godly Revolution (1996).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Though William III was unpopular, Tony Claydon argues that he was the key to solving the chronic instability of 17th-century Britain and Ireland. The author presents William as the crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power.
Long Description
William III, William of Orange (1650-1702), is a key figure in English history. Grandson of Charles I and married to Mary, eldest daughter of James II, the pair became the object of protestant hopes after James lost the throne. Though William was personally unpopular - his continental ties the source of suspicion and resentment - Tony Claydon argues that William was key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. It took someone with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people that had marred Stuart history. Claydon takes a thematic approach to investigate all these aspects in their wider context, and presents William as the crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and as a model of open and participatory government.
Long Description
William III, William of Orange (1650-1702), is a key figure in English history.  Grandson of Charles I and married to Mary, eldest daughter of James II, the pair became the object of protestant hopes after James lost the throne.   Though William was personally unpopular - his continental ties the source of suspicion and resentment - Tony Claydon argues that William was key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland.  It took someone with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people that had marred Stuart history.   Claydon takes a thematic approach to investigate all these aspects in their wider context, and presents William as the crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and as a model of open and participatory government.
Main Description
William III, William of Orange (1650-1702), is a key figure in English history. Grandson of Charles I and married to Mary, eldest daughter of James II, the pair became the object of protestant hopes after James lost the throne.Though William was personally unpopular - his continental ties the source of suspicion and resentment - Tony Claydon argues that William was key to solving the chronic instability of seventeenth-century Britain and Ireland. It took someone with a European vision and foreign experience of handling a free political system, to end the stand-off between ruler and people that had marred Stuart history.Claydon takes a thematic approach to investigate all these aspects in their wider context, and presents William as the crucial factor in Britain's emergence as a world power, and asa model of open and participatory government.
Unpaid Annotation
Offers interpretation of long-term instability of Stuart Britain - key for students of 17th-century Britain. Undergraduate courses on Stuart Britain numerous and popular. Makes important contribution to current debates about why chronic instability ended so suddenly - of wide interest. General interest in English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution - fuelled by recent TV history documentaries. Role of William as icon of Ulster protestantism - full chapter on Irish problem.William III, William of Orange (1650-1702), is a key figure, and yet a strangely neglected one, in British history. Although parliament established its right to rule in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, William III remained one of the architects of the European resistance to France. And while we tend to think of William-and-Mary as a kind of joined-at-the-hip unit, Mary in fact died in 1694, leaving William as sole monarch for the last, and most crucial, eight years of his reign. It was an awkward period since William was personally unpopular, his continental ties the source of suspicion and resentment, and his claim to the throne had only been through his wife. However, the resultant tensions between king and parliament, inevitable given the constitutional uncertainties in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, were in fact productive and in many ways one can see this period as the crucible of the modern parliamentary state. Great developments were set in motion during the reign. The establishment of The Bank of England and modern notions of finance and a National Debt were among these changes. Ministerial responsibility was recognized, the liberty of the presssecured, and the standing army transferred to the control of Parliament. Also, the status of the Church of England was reinforced, though some measure of toleration was provided for in matters of personal conscience. Claydon will inve
Unpaid Annotation
Offers interpretation of long-term instability of Stuart Britain - key for students of 17th-century Britain. Undergraduate courses on Stuart Britain numerous and popular. Makes important contribution to current debates about why chronic instability ended so suddenly - of wide interest. General interest in English Civil War and the Glorious Revolution - fuelled by recent TV history documentaries. Role of William as icon of Ulster protestantism - full chapter on Irish problem. William III, William of Orange (1650-1702), is a key figure, and yet a strangely neglected one, in British history. Although parliament established its right to rule in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, William III remained one of the architects of the European resistance to France. And while we tend to think of William-and-Mary as a kind of joined-at-the-hip unit, Mary in fact died in 1694, leaving William as sole monarch for the last, and most crucial, eight years of his reign. It was an awkward period since William was personally unpopular, his continental ties the source of suspicion and resentment, and his claim to the throne had only been through his wife. However, the resultant tensions between king and parliament, inevitable given the constitutional uncertainties in the aftermath of the Glorious Revolution, were in fact productive and in many ways one can see this period as the crucible of the modern parliamentary state. Great developments were set in motion during the reign. The establishment of The Bank of England and modern notions of finance and a National Debt were among these changes. Ministerial responsibility was recognized, the liberty of the press secured, and the standing army transferred to the control of Parliament. Also, the status of the Church of England was reinforced, though some measure of toleration was provided for in matters of personal conscience. Claydon will investigate all these aspects of the reign in their wider context. Anthony Claydon is head of the Department of History at the University of Wales, Bangor. He is author of William III and the Godly Revolution (CUP, 1996).
Table of Contents
TOC to arrive later
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem