Catalogue

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Matthew and George Culley : travel journals and letters, 1765-1798 /
edited by Anne Orde.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
x, 272 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0197262759
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0197262759
catalogue key
4770399
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
An excellent edition, supported by appropriate footnotes, maps, a glossary, and notes on money, weights and measures.
... a veritable treasure house for anyone wanting to write the local history of agricultural systems at this critical time of enthusiastic innovation.
... offers rich and vivid insights into the constantly changing farming scene.
... these journals vividly illustrate the varied priorities of progressive farmers in this period of ingenious exploration and experiment.
These records have been carefully edited by Dr Orde, who has provided useful annotations and an informative introduction. The collection forms an important source for the agrarian history of the later eighteenth century, and the journals in particular are very readable.
This exemplary edition offers much of value to those interested in eighteenth-century agricultural improvement ... The Culley brothers, who farmed successfully on a large scale in Northumberland, sought in their travels to observe best-practice elsewhere, and their visit to Robert Bakewell is of particular value.
... veritable golden nuggets of precise information.
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The travel journals and letters of Matthew and George Culley provide a picture of agriculture and related conditions in England and Scotland in the late 18th-century, as seen by two successful farmers who pioneered and spread improved methods and livestock breeds in Northumberland and beyond.
Long Description
The travel journals and letters of Matthew and George Culley give a fresh and practical picture of agriculture and related conditions in England and Scotland in the late eighteenth century, as seen by two successful farmers who pioneered and spread improved methods and livestock breeds in Northumberland and beyond.The brothers Matthew and George Culley were successfully improving farmers in north Northumberland. They were instrumental in introducing into northern England the methods and the new Leicester sheep of Robert Bakewell, the pioneer livestock breeder. They themselves developed the Border Leicester, which became a basis for sheep flocks especially in northern England and southern Scotland. They promoted an efficient type of mixed arable and livestock husbandry suited to their area. Both brothers travelled extensively in England and Scotland, observing farming methods and expanding trade, and keeping journals of their travels. These journals and letters, never published before, provide a detailed picture of English and Scottish agriculture in a significant period of change. The Culleys, from a middling social class, were forward-looking men of wide interests. Their down-to-earth journals are worthy to stand alongside such famous contemporary works as Arthur Young's Tours and John Byng's Diaries.
Long Description
The travel journals and letters of Matthew and George Culley give a fresh and practical picture of agriculture and related conditions in England and Scotland in the late eighteenth century, as seen by two successful farmers who pioneered and spread improved methods and livestock breeds in Northumberland and beyond.The brothers Matthew and George Culley were successfully improving farmers in north Northumberland. They were instrumental in introducing into northern England the methods and the new Leicester sheep of Robert Bakewell, the pioneer livestock breeder. They themselves developed the Border Leicester, which became a basis for sheep flocks especially in northern England and southern Scotland. They promoted an efficient type of mixed arable and livestock husbandry suited to their area.Both brothers travelled extensively in England and Scotland, observing farming methods and expanding trade, and keeping journals of their travels. These journals and letters, never published before, provide a detailed picture of English and Scottish agriculture in a significant period of change.The Culleys, from a middling social class, were forward-looking men of wide interests. Their down-to-earth journals are worthy to stand alongside such famous contemporary works as Arthur Young's Tours and John Byng's Diaries.
Main Description
The travel journals and letters of Matthew and George Culley give a fresh and practical picture of agriculture and related conditions in England and Scotland in the late eighteenth century, as seen by two successful farmers who pioneered and spread improved methods and livestock breeds in Northumberland and beyond. These down-to-earth journals are worthy to stand alongside such famous contemporary works as Arthur Young's Tours and John Byng's Diaries.
Table of Contents
Introduction
The Culley Papers Editorial Method List of Maps George Culley
Journal 1765 Matthew Culley
Journal 1770 George Culley
Journal 1771 Matthew Culley
Journal 1775 George Culley
Letters 1784-85 Matthew Culley
Journal 1794 Matthew Culley jr
Journal 1798 Money, Weights, and Measures
Glossary
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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