Catalogue


In my own shire : region and belonging in British writing, 1840-1970 /
Stephen Wade.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
description
viii, 178 p.
ISBN
0313321825 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2002.
isbn
0313321825 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4768604
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Stephen Wade is a Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Huddersfield, England. He has published several scholarly books and articles, as well as some collections of poems
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-10-01:
This study is impossible to summarize: nearly every page develops a different concept of regionalism or defines a British writer's individual handling of it. Wade's concern is to pin down as precisely as possible "the attachments to place and community" or the sense of regional belonging. The subject is staggeringly complicated and lends itself neither to easy geographical orderliness nor simple sequential chronology, yet Wade seems to make sense of it all with his sharp thumbnail biographies and incisive definitions. His first chapter deals with the various traditions of locality and those that are projected onto the landscape by Romantic writers like Wordsworth and Scott. The next several chapters deal with radical upheavals in social, political, intellectual, and religious thoughts and how these found resonance in works of writers like the Brontes, Gaskell, Carleton, Borrow, Blackmore, Hardy, and Bennett and in early modern writers like Morrison, Burnley, and Housman. Later chapters are concerned primarily with writers like Synge, Lawrence, and Orwell, but also with less-well-known writers--e.g., Hanley and Bentley. Writers of the 1960s and 1970s, as interest in region fades, are dealt with briefly. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. T. Loe SUNY at Oswego
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œThis study is impossible to summarize: nearly every page develops a different concept of regionalism or defines a British writer's individual handling of it. Wade's concern is to pin down as precisely as possible "the attachments to place and community" or the sense of regional belonging. The subject is staggeringly complicated and lends itself neither to easy geographical orderliness nor simple sequential chronology, yet Wade seems to make sense of it all with his sharp thumbnail biographies and incisive definitions....Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty.'' Choice
"This study is impossible to summarize: nearly every page develops a different concept of regionalism or defines a British writer's individual handling of it. Wade's concern is to pin down as precisely as possible "the attachments to place and community" or the sense of regional belonging. The subject is staggeringly complicated and lends itself neither to easy geographical orderliness nor simple sequential chronology, yet Wade seems to make sense of it all with his sharp thumbnail biographies and incisive definitions....Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty."- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2003
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Summaries
Long Description
An overview of 19th- and 20th-century writing from the British Isles shows a constant interplay between metropolitan centers and regional peripheriesan interplay that points to the basic importance of place and belonging in literary creation and evaluation. This volume examines the relationship between British literatureincluding poetry, fiction, biography, and dramaand regional consciousness in the Victorian and modern periods, introducing the reader to a range of responses to the profound feelings of belonging engendered by the sense of place. The works covered are a mixture of familiar classics and less well-known writings from working-class writers or forgotten writers who were successful in their era. After accounting for the emergence of regional writing in the early 19th century, the author analyzes the development of regional writing in England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, focusing on issues such as the sociopolitical context of the regional novel, the print and literary cultures around regional presses, and the place of documentary in regional consciousness.
Main Description
An overview of 19th- and 20th-century writing from the British Isles shows a constant interplay between metropolitan centers and regional peripheries--an interplay that points to the basic importance of place and belonging in literary creation and evaluation. This volume examines the relationship between British literature--including poetry, fiction, biography, and drama--and regional consciousness in the Victorian and modern periods, introducing the reader to a range of responses to the profound feelings of belonging engendered by the sense of place. The works covered are a mixture of familiar classics and less well-known writings from working-class writers or forgotten writers who were successful in their era. After accounting for the emergence of regional writing in the early 19th century, the author analyzes the development of regional writing in England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, focusing on issues such as the sociopolitical context of the regional novel, the print and literary cultures around regional presses, and the place of documentary in regional consciousness.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
The Inheritance: Past and Presentp. 11
Place and People Revealed, 1840-1860p. 21
Countries of the Mind: from Wessex to the Kailyardp. 41
Fin De Sièclep. 55
Renaissance: Inventing Celts, Cities, and Folkp. 81
Displacement to Documentaryp. 97
Imagining Wales: James Hanley, the Welsh Sonata, and the Anglo-Welsh Debatep. 115
The New Northerners: Studies of Provincial Lifep. 129
Beyond London: Poetry in Britain from the Periphery, 1945-1970p. 139
Conclusionsp. 151
Notesp. 155
Bibliographyp. 165
Indexp. 171
About the Authorp. 179
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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