Catalogue


William Bradford's books : Of Plimmoth Plantation and the printed word /
Douglas Anderson.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
description
ix, 280 p. : ill.
ISBN
0801870747 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003.
isbn
0801870747 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4768576
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Douglas Anderson is the Sterling Goodman Professor of English at the University of Georgia.
Reviews
Review Quotes
A model of close reading based on strategies that few if any early Americanists have employed.
"A model of close reading based on strategies that few if any early Americanists have employed." -- David D. Hall, Common-Place
Anderson himself has written a book that presents Bradford's work in equally splendid and unexpected ways, restoring complexity and immediacy to a volume that we thought we knew all along... It is a rare accomplishment to bring readers back to a text as canonical as Of Plimmouth Plantation in a new way.
"Anderson himself has written a book that presents Bradford's work in equally splendid and unexpected ways, restoring complexity and immediacy to a volume that we thought we knew all along... It is a rare accomplishment to bring readers back to a text as canonical as Of Plimmouth Plantation in a new way."--Kathleen Donegan, Early American Literature
A substantial analysis of the form and content of Bradford's history of Plymouth studied against the era's reading practices, publishing conventions, and scriptural interpretations... By making sense of Bradford's manuscript, Anderson brings Bradford himself closer.
"A substantial analysis of the form and content of Bradford's history of Plymouth studied against the era's reading practices, publishing conventions, and scriptural interpretations... By making sense of Bradford's manuscript, Anderson brings Bradford himself closer."--Mark Noll, First Things
Meticulously researched and eloquently argued... This lovingly fashioned biography of the first American history book affirms the fundamental responsibilities of good history writing.
"Meticulously researched and eloquently argued... This lovingly fashioned biography of the first American history book affirms the fundamental responsibilities of good history writing." -- Richard J. Bell, New England Quarterly
Rarely can a scholar so thoroughly resituate such a foundational work as William Bradford's history as Anderson does here.
"Rarely can a scholar so thoroughly resituate such a foundational work as William Bradford's history as Anderson does here." -- Julie Sievers, Libraries and Culture
The extraordinary care with which Anderson has crafted his own book can be seen as a kind of homage to its subject... William Bradford's Books is in many ways an unexpectedly rewarding read and a major contribution to early American studies. It is a text that literary critics and historians are both likely to engage with and to rely on for a long time to come and that is poised to change forever how Of Plimmoth Plantation is read and taught.
"The extraordinary care with which Anderson has crafted his own book can be seen as a kind of homage to its subject... William Bradford's Books is in many ways an unexpectedly rewarding read and a major contribution to early American studies. It is a text that literary critics and historians are both likely to engage with and to rely on for a long time to come and that is poised to change forever how Of Plimmoth Plantation is read and taught."--Michelle Burnham, William and Mary Quarterly
The publication of Douglas Anderson's fine book seems, well, providential, and one hopes that it finds the audience that it so richly deserves.
"The publication of Douglas Anderson's fine book seems, well, providential, and one hopes that it finds the audience that it so richly deserves."--David Read, American Historical Review
Through Anderson's rich and multifaceted portrait... the reader ultimately re-experiences the full meaning of Bradford's attempt to capture the Puritan experience in the New World.
"Through Anderson's rich and multifaceted portrait... the reader ultimately re-experiences the full meaning of Bradford's attempt to capture the Puritan experience in the New World." -- Oliver Scheiding, Amerikastudien / American Studies
Anderson's skilled and subtle take on a classic text and its contexts reconstructs our image of Bradford's mental world. Catching the ebb tide of postmodernism, this keen work furnishes a model for future literary-historical scholarship.
"Anderson's skilled and subtle take on a classic text and its contexts reconstructs our image of Bradford's mental world. Catching the ebb tide of postmodernism, this keen work furnishes a model for future literary-historical scholarship."--Michael McGiffert, Editor Emeritus, William and Mary Quarterly
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
An analysis of William Bradford's 'Of Plimmoth Plantation', a portrait of the religious dissenters who emigrated from the Netherlands to New England in 1620, Douglas Anderson offers literary and historical accounts of the text, arguing that it shows remarkable ambition and subtle grace.
Main Description
Widely regarded as the most important narrative of seventeenth-century New England, William Bradford's Of Plimmoth Plantation is one of the founding documents of American literature and history. In William Bradford's Books this portrait of the religious dissenters who emigrated from the Netherlands to New England in 1620 receives perhaps its sharpest textual analysis to date -- and the first since that of Samuel Eliot Morison two generations ago. Far from the gloomy elegy that many readers find, Bradford's history, argues Douglas Anderson, demonstrates remarkable ambition and subtle grace, as it contemplates the adaptive success of a small community of religious exiles. Anderson offers fresh literary and historical accounts of Bradford's accomplishment, exploring the context and the form in which the author intended his book to be read.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: The Operations of Printp. 1
Words and Windp. 25
Such Neighbors and Brethren As We Arep. 69
Artificial Personsp. 113
Here Is the Miserablest Timep. 158
Controller of Storiesp. 203
Conclusion: The High Preserver of Menp. 241
Notesp. 253
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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