Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Afro-optimism : perspectives on Africa's advances /
edited by Ebere Onwudiwe and Minabere Ibelema.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
description
viii, 183 p. : ill.
ISBN
027597586X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.
isbn
027597586X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4766355
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Njoku E. Awa is Associate Professor in the Department of Communications, Cornell University H. Sylvain Boko is Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Wake Forest University Peter P. Ekeh, a political sociologist, is Professor of African American Studies at the State University of New York at Buffalo Richard W. Hull is Professor of African History and Civilization at New York University Minabere Ibelema is Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Okechukwu C. Iheduru is Assistant Professor of Political Science at James Madison College, Michigan State University F. Abiola Irele is Professor of African, French, and Comparative Literature at Ohio State University, with a joint appointment in the Department of Black Studies and the Division of Comparative Studies in the Humanities, and a courtesy appointment in the Department of French and Italian Ali A. Mazrui is the Director of the Institute of Global Cultural Studies and the Albert Schweitzer Professor in the Humanities at Binghamton University Emmanuel U. Nnadozie is Professor of Economics at Truman State University (Missouri) Folu Folarin Ogundimu is Associate Professor in the School of Journalism at Michigan State University Ebere Onwudiwe is Professor of Political Science and the Director of the National Resource Center for African Studies at Central State University (Ohio) Tracy D. Snipe is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Wright State University with research interest in African and African American politics
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-10-01:
Afro-Optimism is a collection of essays by African scholars describing various areas of African cultural and political life from a positivist perspective. However, with only two exceptions (Abiola Irele on artistic creation in postindependent Africa and Sylvain Boko on Africa's economic growth and prospects), the contributions are grounded in research conducted before the early 1990s. Most egregious is a chapter on health advances in Africa that barely mentions the AIDS epidemic. Too much recent scholarship (e.g., Patrick Chabal and Jean-Pascal Daloz's Africa Works, CH, Nov'99; and Comprehending and Mastering African Conflicts, ed. by Adebayo Adedeji; CH, May'02) deals with the same material in more depth and from a more contemporary vantage point. The book does include some nice work (Peter Ekeh's excellent discussion of kinship and civil society), but it needs too much updating. One of the ironies of this volume touting the advancements of Africa is that all of the authors live and work outside of Africa. The volume might have been acceptable if it had been published in 1995, but it is not recommended for purchase today. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. R. M. Fulton Northwest Missouri State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œGiven the difficulty of their mission, the editors and contributors do a fairly good job in managing, against the odds, to create a reasonable space for measured hope against formulations of Afro-pessimism.'' African Studies Review
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Afro-Optimism is a book with a simple thesis: Africa is marching forward, even if at times haltingly and at a different pace from the rest of the world. A common view among journalists and academics alike is that African conditions declined the moment colonial governments left its shores. The chapters in this book cover Africa's progress in health, agriculture, transportation, cultural innovation, and economic advancement. The contributors to the book contend that development is about human beings, so they do not rely exclusively on statistical estimates and projections. The essays in this book discuss the advances African states have made in spite of, and at times because of, their experiences of European colonial rule. The contributors argue that in all facets of development, Africans had to overcome colonial obstacles or had to build on meager colonial foundations. Although the authors acknowledge Africa's disappointing performance in various respects, they stress throughout that exclusive concentration on African failures creates new and reinforces existing negative perceptions of contemporary Africa.
Long Description
The view that Africa regressed the moment that colonial governments left its shores is widespread. This volume is a counterpoint to the orthodoxy. Here 13 scholars with specializations ranging from literature and history to philosophy and economics argue that Africa has advanced since colonialism and is poised to march forward in spite of setbacks and disappointments. The contributors to the book contend that development is about human beings, so they do not rely exclusively on statistical estimates and projections. Afro-Optimism is a book with a simple thesis: Africa is marching forward, even if at times haltingly and at a different pace from the rest of the world. A common view among journalists and academics alike is that African conditions declined the moment colonial governments left its shores. The chapters in this book cover Africa's progress in health, agriculture, transportation, cultural innovation, and economic advancement. The contributors to the book contend that development is about human beings, so they do not rely exclusively on statistical estimates and projections. The essays in this book discuss the advances African states have made in spite of, and at times because of, their experiences of European colonial rule. The contributors argue that in all facets of development, Africans had to overcome colonial obstacles or had to build on meager colonial foundations. Although the authors acknowledge Africa's disappointing performance in various respects, they stress throughout that exclusive concentration on African failures creates new and reinforces existing negative perceptions of contemporary Africa.
Unpaid Annotation
The view that Africa regressed the moment that colonial governments left its shores is widespread. This volume is a counterpoint to the orthodoxy. Here 13 scholars with specializations ranging from literature and history to philosophy and economics argue that Africa has advanced since colonialism and is poised to march forward in spite of setbacks and disappointments. The contributors to the book contend that development is about human beings, so they do not rely exclusively on statistical estimates and projections.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Perspective
Introduction: A Context for Post-Colonial African Discoursep. 3
Culture, Identity, and Development
Tradition and Modernity: The Triumph of African Culturep. 21
Artistic Creation in Post-Independence Africap. 39
Cultural Politics in Post-Independence Senegalp. 53
Governance and the Political Order
Kinship and Civil Society in Post-Colonial Africap. 67
Participatory Decision Making in African Societies Before and After Colonizationp. 83
Economic and Infrastructural Development
A New Look at Africa's Economic Growth and Prospects for the Twenty-First Centuryp. 93
Developments in Transportation and Communicationsp. 109
Health and Agricultural Innovations
Post-Colonial African Achievements in Healthp. 121
Biotechnology, Food Production, and African Advancementp. 149
A Vision of the Future
Afrenaissance: Struggles of Hope in Post-Colonial Africap. 163
Indexp. 177
About the Contributorsp. 181
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem