Catalogue


Gustav Stresemann : Weimar's greatest statesman /
Jonathan Wright.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
xvii, 569 p., [16] p. of plates : ill., maps, ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198219490
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0198219490
catalogue key
4761449
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [529]-552) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-07-01:
Wright (Christ Church, Oxford) has written an impressive and definitive biography of the most important political leader of Weimar Germany. He sees Stresemann as a sincere convert to democracy and international cooperation, but also argues that Stresemann was not able to solve the inherent conflict between Germany's demand for international equality and France's concern for her own security. Stresemann became a symbol for Germans who hoped to preserve liberal and civilized values in their country, and Wright quotes Sebastian Haffner's observation that Stresemann's early death in 1929 marked "the beginning of the end" for the democratic republic. This is a truly impressive work of scholarship based on an exhaustive study of archival and other primary sources, and it should be acquired by all college libraries. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All college and university libraries. J. D. Fraley Birmingham-Southern College
Reviews
Review Quotes
Absorbing and well argued book.
A modern critical biography of Stresemann has been long awaited. JonathanWright has produced a work which satisfies high standards,... the result of manyyears' research using all available sources.
A modern critical biography of Stresemann has been long awaited. Jonathan Wright has produced a work which satisfies high standards,... the result of many years' research using all available sources.
A serious biography of another chancellor that offers a good basis for a compare-and-contrast study of modern and Weimar Germany.
'exceptional...elegantly-written book that persuasively makes the case forStresemann's indispensibility to the poor old Weimar Republic.'Niall Ferguson, Sunday Telegraph, 1/12/02
'exceptional...elegantly-written book that persuasively makes the case for Stresemann's indispensibility to the poor old Weimar Republic.'Niall Ferguson, Sunday Telegraph, 1/12/02
'he abundant detail is balanced by a brilliant 30-page conclusion,pertinently summarising all aspects of Stresemann's influence'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung
'he abundant detail is balanced by a brilliant 30-page conclusion, pertinently summarising all aspects of Stresemann's influence'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung
If Gustav Stresemann, an enigmatic and controversial figure, had not died prematurely in 1929, Germany might just have avoided a Hitler dictatorship. Jonathan Wright's magisterial and authoritative study is to be warmly welcomed as an unrivalled biography of the most important European statesman of the 1920s.
Indispensable for understanding both interwar diplomacy--one of the most important and complex subjects of modern history--and the German problem, a conundrum perhaps still with us.
In this major new book, based on wide reading in Stresemann's private papers, German, British and French archives, and the voluminous diplomatic record of the times, the Oxford historian Jonathan Wright mounts a subtle, nuanced and on the whole convincing defence against [such] criticism [of Stresemann].
It is an elegantly-written book that persuasively makes the case for Stresemann's indispensability to the poor old Weimar Republic.
"Jonathan Wright ... has performed the valuable service of adding an authoritive keystone to the arch of German political life between 1918 and 1933. The book is clearly written and well organized.... it is highly recommended to fill out the education of German specialists on the Germany of the 1920s."--History "lucidly and crisply written... indispensable for understanding interwar diplomacy"--The Atlantic Monthly
"Jonathan Wright ... has performed the valuable service of adding an authoritive keystone to the arch of German political life between 1918 and 1933. The book is clearly written and well organized.... it is highly recommended to fill out the education of German specialists on the Germany of the 1920s."-- History "lucidly and crisply written... indispensable for understanding interwar diplomacy"-- The Atlantic Monthly
Jonathan Wright has written a full-scale academic biography directed at an international specialist readership ... this work will set new standards in research.
Lucid and authoritative.
Meticulously researched and authoritative biography.
... sympathetic and authoritative biographer ... Wright provides a full and persuasive account of Stresemann's professional progression.
'sympathetic and authoritative biographer ... Wright provides a full andpersuasive account of Stresemann's professionsal progression'THES
'sympathetic and authoritative biographer...Wright provides a full andpersuasive account of Stresemann's professionsal progression'THES
'sympathetic and authoritative biographer...Wright provides a full and persuasive account of Stresemann's professionsal progression'THES
'The abundant detail is balanced by a brilliant 30-page conclusion,pertinently summarising all aspects of Stresemann's influence'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung
... the first comprehensive biography in English of one of Germany's three greatest diplomats ... an admirably old-fashioned, academic biography: lucidly and crisply written, it deftly bridges domestic politics and diplomacy.
'the first comprehensive biography in English of one of Germany's threegreatest diplomats" as "an admirably old-fashioned, academic biography: lucidlyand crisply written, it deftly bridges domestic politics and diplomacy."Schwarz concludes that Wright's "judicious work is indispensable forunderstanding both interwar diplomacy--one of the most important and complexsubjects of modern history--and the German problem, a conundrum perhaps stillwith us.'Ben Schartz, The Atlantic Monthly
'the first comprehensive biography in English of one of Germany's three greatest diplomats" as "an admirably old-fashioned, academic biography: lucidly and crisply written, it deftly bridges domestic politics and diplomacy." Schwarz concludes that Wright's "judicious work is indispensable forunderstanding both interwar diplomacy--one of the most important and complex subjects of modern history--and the German problem, a conundrum perhaps still with us.'Ben Schartz, The Atlantic Monthly
This is a great work which will take some superseding in form and content.
Well researched new biography.
[Wright] has produced a thorough, well researched study of the man he sees as "Weimar's Greatest Statesman" ... Wright's interest is in Stresemann as the political leader and the foreign minister, and the book is tightly and clearly focused on this interest. Maps, photographs and a glossary enhance the work ... Scholars will find it the most thorough, up-to-date political study of Stresemann available in English.
Wright provides a balanced account of Stresemann's chancellorship in 1923, doing justice to its significance. This part is not merely fundamental reading for anyone interested in Stresemann; it sets new standards for Weimar historiography. The same applies to Wright's description and analysis of German foreign policy between 1924 and 1929.
'Writing with sound judgement and senstive interpretation, the author hascreated an impressive monument to Stresemann.'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung
'Writing with sound judgement and senstive interpretation, the author has created an impressive monument to Stresemann.'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung
A modern critical biography of Stresemann has been long awaited. Jonathan Wright has produced a work which satisfies high standards,... the result of many years' research using all available sources.'he abundant detail is balanced by a brilliant 30-page conclusion, pertinently summarising all aspects of Stresemann's influence'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung'the first comprehensive biography in English of one of Germany's three greatest diplomats" as "an admirably old-fashioned, academic biography: lucidly and crisply written, it deftly bridges domestic politics and diplomacy." Schwarz concludes that Wright's "judicious work is indispensable for understanding both interwar diplomacy--one of the most important and complex subjects of modern history--and the German problem, a conundrum perhaps still withus.'Ben Schartz, The Atlantic Monthly'sympathetic and authoritative biographer...Wright provides a full and persuasive account of Stresemann's professionsal progression'THES'Writing with sound judgement and senstive interpretation, the author has created an impressive monument to Stresemann.'Eberhard Kolb, Allgemeine Zeitung'exceptional...elegantly-written book that persuasively makes the case for Stresemann's indispensibility to the poor old Weimar Republic.'Niall Ferguson, Sunday Telegraph, 1/12/02
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of Gustav Stresemann, the politician who held together the coalition that provided a serious opposition to the Nazi party in the 1920s. On his death this opposition collapsed and along with it the chance of establishing a stable and democratic Germany at the heart of a stable Europe.
Long Description
Gustav Stresemann was the exceptional political figure of his time. His early death in 1929 has long been viewed as the beginning of the end for the Weimar Republic and the opening through which Hitler was able to come to power. His career was marked by many contradictions but also a pervading loyalty to the values of liberalism and nationalism. This enabled him in time both to adjust to defeat and revolution and to recognize in the Republic the only basis on which Germans could unite, and in European cooperation the only way to avoid a new war. His attempt to build a stable Germany as an equal power in a stable Europe throws an important light on German history in a critical time. Hitler was the beneficiary of his failure but, so long as he was alive, Stresemann offered Germans a clear alternative to the Nazis. Jonathan Wright's fascinating new study is the first modern biography of Stresemann to appear in English or German.
Long Description
Gustav Stresemann was the exceptional political figure of his time. His early death in 1929 has long been viewed as the beginning of the end for the Weimar Republic and the opening through which Hitler was able to come to power. His career was marked by many contradictions but also a pervading loyalty to the values of liberalism and nationalism. This enabled him in time both to adjust to defeat and revolution and to recognize in the Republic the only basis on which Germans couldunite, and in European cooperation the only way to avoid a new war. His attempt to build a stable Germany as an equal power in a stable Europe throws an important light on German history in a critical time. Hitler was the beneficiary of his failure but, so long as he was alive, Stresemann offeredGermans a clear alternative to the Nazis. Jonathan Wright's fascinating new study is the first modern biography of Stresemann to appear in English or German.
Main Description
Gustav Stresemann was the exceptional political figure of his time. His early death in 1929 has long been viewed as the beginning of the end for the Weimar Republic and the opening through which Hitler was able to come to power. His career was marked by many contradictions but also a pervadingloyalty to the values of liberalism and nationalism. This enabled him in time both to adjust to defeat and revolution and to recognize in the Republic the only basis on which Germans could unite, and in European cooperation the only way to avoid a new war. His attempt to build a stable Germany as anequal power in a stable Europe throws an important light on German history in a critical time. Hitler was the beneficiary of his failure but, so long as he was alive, Stresemann offered Germans a clear alternative to the Nazis. Jonathan Wright's fascinating new study is the first modern biographyof Stresemann to appear in English or German.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
List of Maps
List of Abbreviations
Glossary
Introductionp. 1
'The Child is a father of the Man': 1878-1901p. 8
'A hunger for power': Business and Politics, 1901-1914p. 25
The Organization of Manufacturing Industryp. 30
National Liberal Politicsp. 41
'For the greater, freer Germany of the future': War, 1914-1918p. 66
War Aimsp. 68
Unrestricted Submarine Warfarep. 76
Constitutional Reformp. 82
The Crisis of July 1917p. 87
For Victory and Reformp. 96
Defeat and Rejectionp. 105
'We are and remain independent towards the Right and the Left': Accommodation and Opposition, October 1918-June 1920p. 111
Lessons of Defeat: October 1918p. 111
The Shock of Revolutionp. 115
A United Liberal Party?p. 117
Oppositionp. 126
Finding the Middle Groundp. 128
Anti-Semitismp. 136
Independence towards the Leftp. 138
Independence towards the Rightp. 141
Preparing for Governmentp. 144
Foreign Policyp. 145
The Kapp Putschp. 149
The Elections of June 1920p. 158
'The Latchkey to Power': Building a Coalition of the Centre, June 1920-December 1922p. 162
Stresemann's Political Strategyp. 163
Minority Governmentp. 167
A Stresemann Government?p. 177
'Objective Opposition'p. 181
The Assassination of Walther Rathenaup. 191
Towards the Great Coalitionp. 195
The Making of a Republican Statesmanp. 199
'All but political suicide': Ruhr Occupation and Chancellor, 1923p. 202
The Ruhr Occupiedp. 202
Reich Chancellorp. 212
The Stresemann Cabinetsp. 213
The Coalitionp. 217
The Abandonment of Passive Resistancep. 217
On the Brink of Civil Warp. 220
A Second Chancep. 223
Poincare Victoriousp. 226
The Return of the Crown Princep. 231
Dancing on a Volcanop. 233
Intervention in Saxony: The End of the Great Coalitionp. 238
'I will not give in': Reichswehr Intrigue and Hitler Putschp. 244
An Independent Rhineland?p. 251
'In the open battlefield': The Defeat of the Governmentp. 253
'A gleam of light on the otherwise dark horizon': The Dawes Plan and the Road to Locarno, 1924-1925p. 260
Appointment as Foreign Ministerp. 260
Stresemann versus Adenauerp. 262
Revision of the Treaty of Versaillesp. 267
The Dawes Planp. 270
The Elections of May 1924p. 273
'I hated all night'p. 279
The Flight for the Dawes Planp. 283
The London Conference, July-August 1924p. 286
The Drama of Ratificationp. 290
Disillusionment with Politics?p. 292
Membership of the League of Nations?p. 294
Bringing the DNVP into Governmentp. 296
The Proposal for a Security Pactp. 301
The Election of Hindenburg as Reich Presidentp. 307
The Security Pact and the Soviet Unionp. 310
Revision of the Polish Frontierp. 313
Conflict over the Security Pactp. 314
Towards Locarnop. 320
Soviet Threat of Embarrassmentp. 322
Stresemann's Goals before Locarnop. 324
Locarno and the League, 1925-1926p. 330
The Locarno Conferencep. 331
'These donkeys': The DNVP Returns to Oppositionp. 339
The Second Luther Cabinetp. 348
Deadlock Over Entry to the Leaguep. 351
The Treaty of Berlinp. 354
Peaceful Revisionp. 359
Coalition Politicsp. 365
A Time for Optimismp. 368
Entry into the League and Thoiryp. 373
'A crisis of the parliamentary system'p. 383
Stresemann and Secret Rearmamentp. 385
'Responsible realpolitik'p. 387
Peaceful Revision in the Balance, 1927-1928p. 389
Coalition with the DNVPp. 393
The Priority of Peacep. 396
The Consequences for Peaceful Revisionp. 400
The Politics of Foreign Policyp. 401
The Receding Prospect of Frontier Revisionp. 408
Evacuation of the Rhineland and Revision of the Dawes Planp. 412
The Kellogg-Briand Pactp. 415
The Formation of the Great Coalitionp. 418
'The tyranny of the Reichstag party'p. 424
Foreign Minister of the Great Coalitionp. 428
1929: Stresemann or Hugenberg?p. 443
The Committee of Expertsp. 443
The DVP and the Great Coalitionp. 445
The Political System in Crisis: Reflections and Plansp. 454
The Young Planp. 461
Protection of Minorities and Frontier Revisionp. 465
A Franco-German Alliance?p. 474
The Hague Conferencep. 479
Towards European Union?p. 483
Preparing for Hugenberg and Hitlerp. 486
Conclusionp. 492
Mapsp. 526
Bibliographyp. 529
Indexp. 553
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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