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China in the National interest /
Owen Harries, editor.
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2003.
description
xii, 335 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0765801574 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2003.
isbn
0765801574 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4757615
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
With sections on history, poltical economy, culture, military issues and the US-China relationship, this work presents a multifaceted look at a country which is likely to be a major factor in US foreign policy in the 21st century.
Main Description
Covering China's history, political economy, culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating and multifaceted look at a country which is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century. It includes more than 28 articles on China published in The National Interest since 1995. The first in a series of readers drawn from The National Interest, the volume brings together in one place the analysis and insight of some of the leading scholars and practitioners concerned with the Sine-American relationship."China has been and is a particularly difficult subject for Americans, " observes Owen Harries in his introduction. This volume tackles the hard questions. Will successful market reforms lead to the emergence of a prosperous liberal democracy or simply extend the life span of an authoritarian regime? Contributors address (and disagree about) whether Chinese culture and society can adapt to the norms of the free market and the open society. They examine whether growing economic disparities between the developed coastal regions and a backward interior threaten to
Main Description
Covering China's history, political economy, culture,military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating andmultifaceted look at a country which is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy inthe twenty-first century. It includes more than 28 articles on China published inThe National Interest since 1995. The first in a series ofreaders drawn from The National Interest, the volume bringstogether in one place the analysis and insight of some of the leading scholars and practitionersconcerned with the Sino-American relationship. "China has been and is a particularly difficult subject for Americans,"observes Owen Harries in his introduction. This volume tackles the hard questions. Willsuccessful market reforms lead to the emergence of a prosperous liberal democracy or simplyextend the life span of an authoritarian regime? Contributors address (and disagree about)whether Chinese culture and society can adapt to the norms of the free market and the opensociety. They examine whether growing economic disparities between the developed coastal regionsand a backward interior threaten to unleash uncontrollable social unrest. They also considerwhether or not ethnic and religious tensions among China's minority groups contain the seeds forChina's disintegration. Are the United States and China destined toclash? Conclusions provided by the authors vary greatly. Forsome, China is a dangerous rival, a rapidly moderniing power with hegemonic ambitions todominate East Asia. For others, China is a strategic partner and prospective ally. Contributorssquare off on issues of whether China's military poses a real threat or is a "papertiger"; whether the future of Taiwan is to trigger a major war between Beijing andWashington or provide a model for peaceful accommodation of Chinese and American interests inthe region; and whether containment or engagement is the sounder strategy for coping with arising China. The distinguished contributors to this volumeinclude Zbigniew Breinski, Nicholas Eberstadt, John Fitgerald, Bates Gill, Nathan Glaer, DavidLampton, Michael O'Hanlon, Robert Ross, S. Enders Wimbush, Paul Wolfowit, and Robert B.Zoellick. With sections on history, political economy,culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating andmultifaceted overview of a country that is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policyin the twenty-first century. Owen Harries is editor emeritusof The National Interest, the leading realist journal ofinternational affairs, which he founded and edited from 1985 to 2001. He is a senior fellow atthe Center for Independent Studies in Sydney, Australia. He edited Liberty andPolitics and America's Purpose: New Visions of U. S. ForeignPolicy.
Main Description
Covering China's history, political economy, culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating and multifaceted look at a country which is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century. It includes more than 28 articles on China published in The National Interest since 1995. The first in a series of readers drawn from The National Interest , the volume brings together in one place the analysis and insight of some of the leading scholars and practitioners concerned with the Sino-American relationship. "China has been and is a particularly difficult subject for Americans," observes Owen Harries in his introduction. This volume tackles the hard questions. Will successful market reforms lead to the emergence of a prosperous liberal democracy or simply extend the life span of an authoritarian regime? Contributors address (and disagree about) whether Chinese culture and society can adapt to the norms of the free market and the open society. They examine whether growing economic disparities between the developed coastal regions and a backward interior threaten to unleash uncontrollable social unrest. They also consider whether or not ethnic and religious tensions among China's minority groups contain the seeds for China's disintegration. Are the United States and China destined to clash? Conclusions provided by the authors vary greatly. For some, China is a dangerous rival, a rapidly modernizing power with hegemonic ambitions to dominate East Asia. For others, China is a strategic partner and prospective ally. Contributors square off on issues of whether China's military poses a real threat or is a "paper tiger"; whether the future of Taiwan is to trigger a major war between Beijing and Washington or provide a model for peaceful accommodation of Chinese and American interests in the region; and whether containment or engagement is the sounder strategy for coping with a rising China. The distinguished contributors to this volume include Zbigniew Brzezinski, Nicholas Eberstadt, John Fitzgerald, Bates Gill, Nathan Glazer, David Lampton, Michael O'Hanlon, Robert Ross, S. Enders Wimbush, Paul Wolfowitz, and Robert B. Zoellick. With sections on history, political economy, culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating and multifaceted overview of a country that is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century.
Main Description
Covering China's history, political economy, culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating and multifaceted look at a country which is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century. It includes more than 28 articles on China published in The National Interest since 1995. The first in a series of readers drawn from The National Interest , the volume brings together in one place the analysis and insight of some of the leading scholars and practitioners concerned with the Sino-American relationship. "China has been and is a particularly difficult subject for Americans," observes Owen Harries in his introduction. This volume tackles the hard questions. Will successful market reforms lead to the emergence of a prosperous liberal democracy or simply extend the life span of an authoritarian regime? Contributors address (and disagree about) whether Chinese culture and society can adapt to the norms of the free market and the open society. They examine whether growing economic disparities between the developed coastal regions and a backward interior threaten to unleash uncontrollable social unrest. They also consider whether or not ethnic and religious tensions among China's minority groups contain the seeds for China's disintegration. Are the United States and China destined to clash? Conclusions provided by the authors vary greatly. For some, China is a dangerous rival, a rapidly modernizing power with hegemonic ambitions to dominate East Asia. For others, China is a strategic partner and prospective ally. Contributors square off on issues of whether China's military poses a real threat or is a "paper tiger"; whether the future of Taiwan is to trigger a major war between Beijing and Washington or provide a model for peaceful accommodation of Chinese and American interests in the region; and whether containment or engagement is the sounder strategy for coping with a rising China. The distinguished contributors to this volume include Zbigniew Brzezinski, Nicholas Eberstadt, John Fitzgerald, Bates Gill, Nathan Glazer, David Lampton, Michael O'Hanlon, Robert Ross, S. Enders Wimbush, Paul Wolfowitz, and Robert B. Zoellick. With sections on history, political economy, culture, military issues, and the U. S.-China relationship, this book presents a fascinating and multifaceted overview of a country that is likely to be a major factor in U. S. foreign policy in the twenty-first century. Owen Harries is editor emeritus of The National Interest , the leading realist journal of international affairs, which he founded and edited from 1985 to 2001. He is a senior fellow at the Center for Independent Studies in Sydney, Australia. He edited Liberty and Politics and America's Purpose: New Visions of U. S. Foreign Policy .
Table of Contents
Introductionp. vii
China, Asia, and America
Living With Chinap. 3
Remembering the Futurep. 21
Asia in the 21st Century: Power Politics Alive and Wellp. 35
China: What Engagement Should Meanp. 45
Why Our Hardliners Are Wrongp. 58
China: Getting the Questions Rightp. 71
The World Shakes Chinap. 86
The Revolution Reversed: China's Islamist Problemp. 105
Small Mercies: China and America after 9/11p. 115
Political Economy
The Short March: China's Road to Democracyp. 127
China's Democratic Prospects--A Dissenting Viewp. 139
Undemocratic Capitalism: China and the Limits of Economismp. 148
Unsettled Succession: China's Critical Momentp. 161
Culture and Society
Two Cheers for "Asian Values"p. 175
Another Way to Skin a Cat: The Spirit of Capitalism and the Confucian Ethicp. 186
China and the Quest for Dignityp. 195
The New Mandarinsp. 211
Asia Tomorrow, Gray and Malep. 215
City of Bad Omensp. 228
Military-Security Issues
The Stability of Deterrence in the Taiwan Straitp. 243
China's Hollow Militaryp. 255
China's Military: A Second Opinionp. 266
China's Military: Take 3p. 275
Balance, Not Containment: A Geopolitical Take from Canberrap. 279
History and Historiography
Communist Crowd Controlp. 295
China and the Historiansp. 301
Mao in Historyp. 312
China Studies in McCarthy's Shadow: A Personal Memoirp. 325
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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