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The presidency, Congress, and divided government : a postwar assessment /
Richard S. Conley.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2003.
description
xv, 279 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1585442119 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2003.
isbn
1585442119 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4755592
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 259-273) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard S. Conley, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Florida, has had a number of articles on American and Canadian politics published in scholarly journals. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland and a M.A. from McGill University in Montreal, Canada
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-10-01:
Is there a need for more analysis of divided government in the US? Conley (Univ. of Florida) convincingly demonstrates in his introduction that most of the research on divided government has ignored questions relating to the president as legislative leader. The originality of his research comes from the comparative analysis examining how presidents since 1945 have tried to lead Congress in periods of divided government. Some readers will find this book useful for its descriptions of political time in the last half of the 20th century. Because of the need to navigate through 50 years of political history, others may find the narrative dense, yet superficial. Using Mayhew's "Significant Domestic Laws," the author is able to construct a model of the legislative presidency. Conley combines case studies of each presidential administration with sophisticated time series analysis. He carefully explains the methodology and results and provides the information necessary for replication. The author concludes with a lively call for additional research. He suggests how to apply his analysis to an examination of the legislative presidency in foreign policy and executive-legislative relations in other countries. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate collections and above. J. D. Rausch West Texas A&M University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Conley . . . selects an important issue: the near-permanence of divided government in the national government for the part two decades and its dominance ever since 1946. Although split-party control has not produced policy deadlock or gridlock, neither has its impact on presidential leadership and the retention of congressional prerogatives been adequately explored and analyzed."--C. Louis Fisher
�Conley . . . selects an important issue: the near-permanence of divided government in the national government for the part two decades and its dominance ever since 1946. Although split-party control has not produced policy deadlock or gridlock, neither has its impact on presidential leadership and the retention of congressional prerogatives been adequately explored and analyzed.�--C. Louis Fisher
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
Can presidents hope to be effective in policy making when Congress is ruled by the other party? Political scientist Richard Conley brings to this crucial discussion a fresh perspective. He argues persuasively that the conditions of divided government have changed in recent years, and he applies a rigorous methodology that allows the testing of a number of important assumptions about party control of the legislative process and the role of the president. Conley demonstrates that recent administrations have faced a very different playing field than those in the earlier post-war years because of such critical developments in electoral politics as decreasing presidential coattails and the lack of presidential popularity in opposition members' districts. Moreover, he identifies several changes in the institutional setting in Congress that have affected both the legislative success rates of presidents' programs and the strategies presidents pursue. These institutional factors include more assertive legislative majorities, changes in leadership structure, and increased party cohesion in voting. Conley uses both case studies and sophisticated time-series regression analyses to examine the floor success of presidential initiatives, the strategies presidents use in working with the legislature, and the use of veto power to achieve presidential aims. Scholars of the presidency and those interested in the larger American political process will find in this book both food for thought and a model of analytic sophistication.
Unpaid Annotation
Can presidents hope to be effective in policy making when Congress is ruled by the other party? Political scientist Richard S. Conley brings to this crucial discussion a fresh perspective. He argues persuasively that the conditions of "divided government" have changed in recent years, and he applies a rigorous methodology that allows the testing of a number of important assumptions about party control of the legislative process and the role of the president.Conley demonstrates that recent administrations have faced a very different playing field than those in the earlier postwar years because of such critical developments in electoral politics as decreasing presidential coattails and the lack of presidential popularity in opposition members' districts. Moreover, he identifies several changes in the institutional setting in Congress that have affected both the legislative success rates of presidents' programs and the strategies presidents pursue. These institutional factors include more assertive legislative majorities, changes in leadership structure, and increased party cohesion in voting.Conley uses both case studies and sophisticated time-series regression analyses to examine the floor success of presidential initiatives, the strategies presidents use in working with the legislature, and the use of veto power to achieve presidential aims.Scholars of the presidency and those interested in the larger American political process will find in this book both food for thought and a model of analytic sophistication.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
List of Tablesp. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introduction: Party Control and Presidential Leverage in Political Timep. 3
The Legislative Presidency and Eras of Congress: A Longitudinal Analysisp. 44
Truman, Eisenhower, and Divided Governmentp. 84
Nixon and Divided Governmentp. 110
Reagan and Divided Governmentp. 126
Bush, Clinton, and Divided Governmentp. 142
Kennedy, Johnson, and Unified Government at the Crossroads of Erasp. 167
Carter, Clinton, and Unified Government in the Postreform/Party-Unity Erap. 190
Conclusionp. 214
Mayhew's Significant Domestic Lawsp. 223
Modeling Congressional Support for the Presidentp. 233
Presidential Position Votes, 80th Housep. 237
Notesp. 239
Bibliographyp. 259
Indexp. 275
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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