Catalogue


Customers and patrons of the mad-trade : the management of lunacy in eighteenth-century London : with the complete text of John Monro's 1766 case book / Jonathan Andrews and Andrew Scull.
Andrews, Jonathan, 1961-
imprint
Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, c2003.
description
xvi, 209 p. : ill.
ISBN
0520226607 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, c2003.
isbn
0520226607 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4755561
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"The authors/editors have performed an invaluable service not only to the scholarly community, but to anyone who cares about the treatment of those we call mentally ill. Their transcription and editing of the candid case book of a prominent mid-eighteenth-century physician provide an extraordinarily circumstantial and illuminating glimpse into a vanished world of private psychiatric practice, at once alien yet surprisingly familiar."--Charles E. Rosenberg, author ofThe Care of Strangers
Flap Copy
"The authors/editors have performed an invaluable service not only to the scholarly community, but to anyone who cares about the treatment of those we call mentally ill. Their transcription and editing of the candid case book of a prominent mid-eighteenth-century physician provide an extraordinarily circumstantial and illuminating glimpse into a vanished world of private psychiatric practice, at once alien yet surprisingly familiar."--Charles E. Rosenberg, author of The Care of Strangers
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-07-01:
Andrews (humanities, Oxford Brookes Univ.) and Scull (sociology, Univ. of California, San Diego) provide an almost voyeuristic look at the "mad-trade" in 18th-century London. Though many laypersons believe that contemporary health science has a long way to go in treatment of the mentally ill, this book clearly shows how far society has come. The authors begin by painting a picture of the mad-trade through analysis of historical documents, literature, and art of the time, and they verify this representation with the case writings of Dr. John Monro. Perhaps students and even some faculty will not recognize Monro's name, but most will recognize the famous hospital in which he plied his trade--Bethlem (known popularly as "Bedlam"). Though the text is extremely specific in its focus, the analysis is ripe for historical comparisons in abnormal psychology or history of psychology courses. Despite the somewhat disturbing methods of the "mad-trade," readers will discover the beginnings of systematic approaches to working with patients, including issues of consultation, diagnosis, treatment, individual characteristics and treatment for pay. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and professionals interested in the history of the discipline. R. E. Osborne Southwest Texas State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Guardian UK, May 2003
Choice, July 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
An important, nuanced, and fascinating account of the socio-cultural milieu that shaped and constituted the 18th-century mad-trade, centered around the clinical pratice of the most famous psychiatrist in 18th-century England.
Long Description
This book is a lively commentary on the eighteenth-century mad-business, its practitioners, its patients (or "customers"), and its patrons, viewed through the unique lens of the private case book kept by the most famous mad-doctor in Augustan England, Dr. John Monro (1715-1791). Monro's case book, comprising the doctor's jottings on patients he saw in the course of his private practice--patients drawn from a great variety of social strata--offers an extraordinary window into the subterranean world of the mad-trade in eighteenth-century London. The volume concludes with a complete edition of the case book itself, transcribed in full with editorial annotations by the authors. In the fragmented stories Monro's case book provides, Andrews and Scull find a poignant underworld of human psychological distress, some of it strange and some quite familiar. They place these "cases" in a real world where John Monro and othersuccessful doctors were practicing, not to say inventing, the diagnosis and treatment of madness.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a commentary on the 18th-century mad-business, its practitioners, its patients, or customers, and its patrons, viewed through the unique lens of the private case book kept by the most famous mad-doctor in Augustan England, Dr. John Monro.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Preface
Acknowledgments
Managing Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London
Customers, Patrons, and Their Mad-Doctor
A Rare Resource: John Monro's Case Book
Profiling Patients and Patterns of Practice
The Craft of Consultation: Managing Patients and Their Problems
Diagnosing the Mad
Religion, Madness, and the Case Book
Treating Patients and Getting Paid
Being Mad in Eighteenth-Century England: Patients' Views of Their Own Illnesses
John Monro's 1766 Case Book
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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