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Gender in early modern German history /
edited by Ulinka Rublack.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
xiii, 308 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521813980
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
0521813980
catalogue key
4752395
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-07-01:
Comprising 11 essays plus an introduction, this volume offers a challenging sampling of recent scholarship in German gender history, c.1500-1800. It is ironic and a little saddening that among the German, American, and English authors, all are women. Most contributions are "case studies"; several are laden with theory. The common goal is not to isolate "female experience" but "to convey the multifacetedness and dynamics of gender experiences, politics, and everyday life" among both men and women. The essays fall under four rubrics: masculinities, transgressions, politics, and religion; those in this final group are among the most readable and engaging. The highly varied foci include witchcraft accusations against men, the problem of confessionally mixed marriages, biographies of Pietist women, and sensational tales of dildo-wielding transvestites. Here and there feminist ideology may outweigh historical evidence, but in general, these studies demonstrate how far historians of gender have come in sophistication, subtlety, and imaginative use of sources. Merry Wiesner's survey of recent theoretical approaches is especially helpful. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Accessible to advanced undergraduates, but most useful to graduate students and above. R. B. Barnes Davidson College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...[a] multifaceted anthology of solid scholarship, intriguing new historical approaches, and extensive historiography. The editor, together with her ten collaborators, has achieved a scholarly work of wide geographical and chronological scope...This anthology should not only be read by scholars and students of the early modern German period but by early modern Europeanists in general." Renaissance Quarterly
"An extraordinary book that takes monsters and the mundane in stride and is not dry as dust scholarship but infused with life and insight." Bibliotheque d'humanisme et Renaissance
"It can only be hoped that this volume will alert those interested in gender and early modern studies to the exciting work being undertaken in the German context." H-GERMAN
"Offers a challenging sampling of recent scholarship in German gender history.... Recommended."Choice
"Remarkable for uniqueness and depth..."History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us think in new ways about the meanings of gender and identity in the past.
Description for Bookstore
This 2002 volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us consider the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered.
Description for Bookstore
This volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us think anew about the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered.
Description for Bookstore
Why did parents prosecute their children as witches? Why did a sixteenth-century midwife entice a burgher woman to pretend she was giving birth to puppies? How did the life of a transsexual woman in early eighteenth-century Hamburg end? This volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us think in new ways about the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered.
Description for Library
Why did parents prosecute their children as witches? Why did a sixteenth-century midwife entice a burgher woman to pretend she was giving birth to puppies? How did the life of a transsexual woman in early eighteenth-century Hamburg come to its end? This volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us think in new ways about the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered.
Main Description
Why did parents prosecute their children as witches? Why did a sixteenth-century midwife entice a burgher woman to pretend she was giving birth to puppies? How did the life of a transsexual woman in early eighteenth-century Hamburg end? This volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment. The study reveals new meanings of gender and identity relating to the experiences of men and women in early modern German history.
Main Description
Why did parents prosecute their children as witches? Why did a sixteenth-century midwife entice a burgher woman to pretend that she was giving birth to puppies? How did the life of a transsexual woman in early eighteenth-century Hamburg come to its end? Originally published in 2002, this volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us consider the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered. The book argues for approaches to early modern history which point to the complexity of peoples' attitudes, in terms of contemporary experiences of the physical, both emotional and imaginary; of shifting symbolisations of evil, sexual symbolisms, of perceived boundaries between the 'real' and the 'fantastical', family structures and spiritual worlds.
Main Description
Why did parents prosecute their children as witches? Why did a sixteenth-century midwife entice a burgher woman to pretend that she was giving birth to puppies? How did the life of a transsexual woman in early eighteenth-century Hamburg come to its end? This volume presents a range of startling case-studies from German society between the Renaissance and the Enlightenment which make us think in new ways about the meanings of gender and identity in the past and which relates, above all, to the lived experiences of men and women, whose lives and choices mattered. The book argues for approaches to early modern history which point to the complexity of peoples' attitudes, in terms of contemporary experiences of the physical, both emotional and imaginary; of shifting symbolisations of evil, sexual symbolisms, of perceived boundaries between the 'real' and the 'fantastical', family structures and spiritual worlds.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Masculinities
What made a man a man? Sixteenth- and seventeenth-century findings
Men in witchcraft trials: towards a social anthropology of 'male' understandings of magic and witchcraft
Transgressions
Monstrous deception: midwifery, fraud and gender in early modern Rothenburg ob der Tauber
'Evil imaginings and fantasies': child witches and the end of the witch craze
Gender tales: the multiple identities of Maiden Heinrich, Hamburg 1700
Disembodied theory? Discourses of sex in early modern Germany
Politics
Peasant protest and the language of womens' petitions: Christina Vend's supplications of 1629
State formation, gender and the experience of governance in early modern W├╝rttemberg
Religion
Cloistering womens' past: conflicting accounts of enclosure in a seventeenth-century Munich nunnery
Memory, religion and family in the writing of Pietist women
One body, two confessions: mixed marriages in Germany
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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