Catalogue


Writings on music, 1965-2000 /
Steve Reich ; edited with an introduction by Paul Hillier.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
xvi, 254 p. : ill., music ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0195111710 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
uniform title
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0195111710 (cloth)
catalogue key
4751448
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [243]-245) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-05-01:
Like many acclaimed artists, composer Reich is a virtual unknown outside of devotees of avant-garde or experimental music ( la John Cage minimalism). This book is a collection of his writings about this specialized area of music, made by and for music academics and "serious" artists. Reading about sounds is always a dry experience, but these 64 short pieces (some only a paragraph) may be essentially indecipherable for those without an academic musical background, owing to the heavy use of music terminology despite Reich's generally conversational tone. The pieces, including Reich's best-known "Music as a Gradual Process," are primarily concerned with Reich's own compositions and reflect his changing preoccupations through time: tape loops and phasing in the Sixties, African drumming in the early Seventies, and so on. In fact, this book might have been better titled Thoughts on Music, as most of the writing comes across as extemporaneous rather than studied and includes a number of interviews, which one is hardpressed to describe as "writings." Recommended for academic libraries or specialized collections only. David Valencia, King Cty. Lib. Syst., Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Reich, born in 1936, is one of the most important composers alive. His work, over forty-year period, has helped to shape and transform contemporary music. What is impressive.is his complete vocational certainty, his absolute determination to succeed, and the primacy of the musical product over all other aspects of his life. Given such a vision, it is no surprise to discover the contents ofWritings on Music, 1965-2000are similarly sharp-focused....Some of his most important observations (regarding both his own music and the arts in general) are delivered in a deliberately aphoristic form, as , as perhaps befits a former philosophy major who studied at Cornell in the wake of Wittgenstein."--imes Literary Supplement, October, 11 2002
"Reich, born in 1936, is one of the most important composers alive. His work, over forty-year period, has helped to shape and transform contemporary music. What is impressive.is his complete vocational certainty, his absolute determination to succeed, and the primacy of the musical productover all other aspects of his life. Given such a vision, it is no surprise to discover the contents of Writings on Music, 1965-2000 are similarly sharp-focused....Some of his most important observations (regarding both his own music and the arts in general) are delivered in a deliberatelyaphoristic form,as perhaps befits a former philosophy major who studied at Cornell in the wake of Wittgenstein."--imes Literary Supplement, October, 11 2002
"Reich, born in 1936, is one of the most important composers alive. His work, over forty-year period, has helped to shape and transform contemporary music. What is impressive.is his complete vocational certainty, his absolute determination to succeed, and the primacy of the musical product over all other aspects of his life. Given such a vision, it is no surprise to discover the contents of Writings on Music, 1965-2000 are similarly sharp-focused....Some of his most important observations (regarding both his own music and the arts in general) are delivered in a deliberately aphoristic form, as , as perhaps befits a former philosophy major who studied at Cornell in the wake of Wittgenstein."--imes Literary Supplement, October, 11 2002
"Reich, born in 1936, is one of the most important composers alive. Hiswork, over forty-year period, has helped to shape and transform contemporarymusic. What is impressive.is his complete vocational certainty, his absolutedetermination to succeed, and the primacy of the musical product over all otheraspects of his life. Given such a vision, it is no surprise to discover thecontents of Writings on Music, 1965-2000 are similarly sharp-focused....Some ofhis most important observations (regarding both his own music and the arts ingeneral) are delivered in a deliberately aphoristic form,as perhaps befits aformer philosophy major who studied at Cornell in the wake ofWittgenstein."--imes Literary Supplement, October, 11 2002
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout his career, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind. Writings on Musicdocuments the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich's 1968 essay "Music as a Gradual Process," widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequent essays, articles, and interviews treat Reich's early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music--African drumming, Balinesegamelan, Hebrew cantillation--and the influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich's reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer's career is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings. Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recently introduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich's music in greater depth and perspective.
Main Description
In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout hiscareer, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind. Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich's 1968 essay "Music as a Gradual Process," widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequentessays, articles, and interviews treat Reich's early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music -- African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation -- andthe influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich's reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer'scareer is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings. Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recentlyintroduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich's music in greater depth and perspective.
Main Description
In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout hiscareer, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an original musical mind. Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich's 1968 essay "Music as a Gradual Process," widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequentessays, articles, and interviews treat Reich's early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essays recount his exposure to non-western music--African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation--and theinfluence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich's reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, Gyorgy Ligeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer's careeris also explored through notes written for performances and recordings. Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recentlyintroduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich's music in greater depth and perspective.
Long Description
In the mid-1960s, Steve Reich radically renewed the musical landscape with a back-to-basics sound that came to be called Minimalism. These early works, characterized by a relentless pulse and static harmony, focused single-mindedly on the process of gradual rhythmic change. Throughout his career, Reich has continued to reinvigorate the music world, drawing from a wide array of classical, popular, sacred, and non-western idioms. His works reflect the steady evolution of an originalmusical mind. Writings on Music documents the creative journey of this thoughtful, groundbreaking composer. These 64 short pieces include Reich's 1968 essay "Music as a Gradual Process," widely considered one of the most influential pieces of music theory in the second half of the 20th century. Subsequent essays, articles, and interviews treat Reich's early work with tape and phase shifting, showing its development into more recent work with speech melody and instrumental music. Other essaysrecount his exposure to non-western music -- African drumming, Balinese gamelan, Hebrew cantillation -- and the influence of these musics as structures and not as sounds. The writings include Reich's reactions to and appreciations of the works of his contemporaries (John Cage, Luciano Berio, Morton Feldman, GyorgyLigeti) and older influences (Kurt Weill, Schoenberg). Each major work of the composer's career is also explored through notes written for performances and recordings. Paul Hillier, himself a respected figure in the early music and new music worlds, has revisited these texts, working with the author to clarify their central narrative: the aesthetic and intellectual development of an influential composer. For long-time listeners and young musicians recently introduced to his work, this book provides an opportunity to get to know Reich's music in greater depth and perspective.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A collection of the composer Steve Reich's writings on music, from his 1968 essay, Music as a Gradual Process, which was the founding call for the development of Minimalism, to his work on non-Western music that contributed to Drumming.
Table of Contents
Writings on Music
Author's Prefacep. vii
Editor's Prefacep. xi
Introductionp. 3
Early Works (1965-68)p. 19
Excerpts from an Interview in Art Forump. 33
Music as a Gradual Process (1968)p. 34
Wavelength by Michael Snow (1968)p. 36
The Phase Shifting Pulse Gate-four Organs-phase Patterns-an End to Electronics (1968-70)p. 38
Some Optimistic Predictions (1970) About the Future of Musicp. 51
First Interview with Michael Nyman (1970)p. 52
Gahu-a Dance of the Ewe Tribe in Ghana (1971)p. 55
Drumming (1971)p. 63
Clapping Music (1972)p. 68
Postscript to a Brief Study of Balinese and African Music (1973)p. 69
Notes on Music and Dance (1973)p. 71
Six Pianos (1973)p. 73
Music for Mallet Instruments, Voices, and Organ (1973)p. 77
Steve Reich and Musicans (1973)p. 78
Music and Performance (1969-74; 1993)p. 81
Videotape and a Composer (1968)p. 82
Dachau, 1974 by Beryl Korotp. 85
Music for 18 Musicians (1976)p. 87
Second Interview with Michael Nyman (1976)p. 91
Music for a Large Ensemble (1978)p. 97
Octet (1979)p. 98
Variations for Winds, Strings, and Keyboards (1979)p. 99
Tehillim (1981)p. 100
Hebrew Cantillation as an Influence on Composition (1982)p. 105
Vermont Counterpoint (1982)p. 119
Eight Lines (1983)p. 119
The Desert Music (1984)p. 120
The Desert Music-steve Reich in Conversation with Jonathan Cott (1984)p. 127
Sextet (1985)p. 131
New York Counterpoint (1985)p. 135
Three Movements (1986)p. 136
Tenney (1986)p. 137
Texture-space-survival (1987)p. 139
The Four Sections (1987)p. 144
Electric Counterpoint (1987)p. 145
Non-Western Music and the Western Composer (1988)p. 147
Different Trains (1988)p. 151
Chamber Music-an Expanded View (1989)p. 156
Questionnaire (1989)p. 158
On the Size and Seating of an Orchestra (1990)p. 162
Aaron Copland (1990)p. 164
John Cage (1992)p. 165
Kurt Weill, the Orchestra, and Vocal Style-an Interview with K. Robert Schwarz (1992)p. 166
The Cavep. 168
Jonathan Cott Interviews Beryl Korot and Steve Reich on the Cave (1993)p. 171
Thoughts About the Madness in Abraham's Cave (1994) Steve Reich and Beryl Korotp. 178
Answers to Questions About Different Trains (1994)p. 180
Duet (1994)p. 183
Nagoya Marimbas (1994)p. 184
The Future of Music for the Next 150 Years (1994)p. 184
Beautiful /ugly (1994)p. 185
Schönberg (1995)p. 186
City Life (1995)p. 187
Proverb (1995)p. 191
Music and Language (1996)p. 193
Feldman (1997)p. 202
Berio (1997)p. 203
Three Tales (1998-2002) Steve Reich and Beryl Korotp. 204
Triple Quartet (1999)p. 208
Know What is Above You (1999)p. 211
Two Questions About Opera (1999)p. 211
Ligeti (2000)p. 212
De Keersmaeker, Kylian, and European Dance (2000)p. 213
Steve Reich in Conversation with Paul Hillier (2000)p. 216
Text Creditsp. 242
Bibliographyp. 243
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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