Catalogue


Beyond party : cultures of antipartisanship in northern politics before the Civil War/
Mark Voss-Hubbard.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.
description
xii, 266 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0801869404 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.
isbn
0801869404 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4749463
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Mark Voss-Hubbad is an assistant professor of history and graduate program coordinator at Eastern Illinois University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2004-02-01:
At one level, Voss-Hubbard's book is a "social history of the antiparty and anti-politician sensibilities" expressed in the Know Nothing movement. By extension, it is also a penetrating study of political culture in the mid-1850s. Although the focus is limited--three northern counties in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania--the book's argument transcends this base. Voss-Hubbard (Eastern Illinois Univ.) is interested in how the many demographic and economic changes of the 1850s were translated into political terms. Beyond its obvious anti-immigrant, anti-Catholic appeal, the Know Nothings capitalized on a widespread antiparty sentiment among voters and crafted "a millennial appeal to purify politics and governance." When the party moved from its nonpartisan fraternal form to party and then to governance, the nativist movement faltered. Overwhelmed by a host of commercial, fiscal, and governmental issues--as well as by a truncated legislative calendar, extensive patronage decisions, and the omnipresent slavery extension issue--Know Nothing governments largely failed to meet expectations. The party's economic nationalism, antiparty message and practices, and appeal to the middling sort would, however, provide a template for the emerging Republican Party. This book is the very rare historical monograph that is more than the sum of its parts. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. Morrison Purdue University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Beyond Party makes an outstanding contribution to the literature of nineteenth-century American politics. Through his careful analysis of the Know Nothing party, Voss-Hubbard offers fascinating insights that extend our knowledge of political culture before the Civil War." -- Jean H. Baker, Goucher College
A shrewd interpretation of the Know Nothings and the world they tried to win. Voss-Hubbard speaks across disciplinary lines to all students of parties and antiparties in the nineteenth century.
"A shrewd interpretation of the Know Nothings and the world they tried to win. Voss-Hubbard speaks across disciplinary lines to all students of parties and antiparties in the nineteenth century." -- Michael Kazin, Professor of History, Georgetown University
Beyond Party makes an outstanding contribution to the literature of nineteenth-century American politics. Through his careful analysis of the Know Nothing party, Voss-Hubbard offers fascinating insights that extend our knowledge of political culture before the Civil War.
"Voss-Hubbard's meticulous attention to the Know Nothings' local roots and antiparty spirit offers intriguing insights on pre--Civil War political developments."--Vernon Volpe, Annals of Iowa
Voss-Hubbard's meticulous attention to the Know Nothings' local roots and antiparty spirit offers intriguing insights on preCivil War political developments.
Voss-Hubbard's meticulous attention to the Know Nothings' local roots and antiparty spirit offers intriguing insights on pre--Civil War political developments.
"Voss-Hubbard argues that the antipartisanship of the Know Nothings made a major contribution to the emergence of the Republican party. This welcomed book ought to encourage further study of antebellum politics in Connecticut."--Lawrence B. Goodheart, Connecticut History
Voss-Hubbard offers not only a persuasive explanation for the rise and fall of the Know-Nothings but also provides valuable insights into the political culture of the pre-Civil War North.
"Voss-Hubbard offers not only a persuasive explanation for the rise and fall of the Know-Nothings but also provides valuable insights into the political culture of the pre-Civil War North." -- Keith Ian Polakoff, History: Reviews of New Books
Voss-Hubbard provides a detailed analysis at county level of the rapid and realigning political changes that were underway. He details with skill the culture from which they came.
"Voss-Hubbard provides a detailed analysis at county level of the rapid and realigning political changes that were underway. He details with skill the culture from which they came."--Philip John Davies, Journal of American Studies
Voss-Hubbard's contribution to understanding the Know Nothings is to explore at the local level the working of that antiparty spirit among Know Nothings... Suggestive and interesting.
"Voss-Hubbard's contribution to understanding the Know Nothings is to explore at the local level the working of that antiparty spirit among Know Nothings... Suggestive and interesting."--Mark E. Neely Jr., Journal of the Early Republic
Voss-Hubbard argues that the antipartisanship of the Know Nothings made a major contribution to the emergence of the Republican party. This welcomed book ought to encourage further study of antebellum politics in Connecticut.
Beyond Party begins a new strand of Civil War historiography, and that is a major achievement.
"Beyond Party begins a new strand of Civil War historiography, and that is a major achievement." -- Frank Towers, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography
In this most interesting and cogent book, Mark Voss-Hubbard recognizes the pragmatic functions of much antiparty rhetoric... His evidence also brings new understanding of the forces underlying major political realignment, confirms the high level of popular engagement in politics at such moments, and reemphasizes the power of the partisan imperative in the mid-nineteenth century.
"In this most interesting and cogent book, Mark Voss-Hubbard recognizes the pragmatic functions of much antiparty rhetoric... His evidence also brings new understanding of the forces underlying major political realignment, confirms the high level of popular engagement in politics at such moments, and reemphasizes the power of the partisan imperative in the mid-nineteenth century."--Donald J. Ratcliffe, American Historical Review
In what is the most valuable and illuminating part of his book, Voss-Hubbard follows Know-Nothing leaders into state legislatures after their political triumph to see exactly how the antiparty party dealt with governmental responsibility.
"In what is the most valuable and illuminating part of his book, Voss-Hubbard follows Know-Nothing leaders into state legislatures after their political triumph to see exactly how the antiparty party dealt with governmental responsibility."--Stephen E. Maizlish, Journal of American History
A penetrating study of political culture in the mid-1850s... This book is the very rare historical monograph that is more than the sum of its parts.
"A penetrating study of political culture in the mid-1850s... This book is the very rare historical monograph that is more than the sum of its parts."-- Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2004
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Summaries
Main Description
Captivating disgruntled voters, third parties have often complicated the American political scene. In the years before the Civil War, third-party politics took the form of the Know Nothings, who mistrusted established parties and gave voice to anti-government sentiment. Originating about 1850 as a nativist fraternal order, the Know Nothing movement soon spread throughout the industrial North. In Beyond Party, Mark Voss-Hubbard draws on local sources in three different states where the movement was especially strong to uncover its social roots and establish its relationship to actual public policy issues. Focusing on the 1852 ten hour movement in Essex County, Massachusetts, the pro-temperance and anti-Catholic agitation in and around Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and the movement to restrict immigrants' voting rights and overthrow "corrupt parties and politicians" in New London County, Connecticut, he shows that these places shared many of the social problems that occurred throughout the North -- the consolidation of capitalist agriculture and industry, the arrival of Irish and German Catholic immigrants, and the changing fortunes of many established political leaders. Voss-Hubbard applies the insights of social history and social movement theory to politics in arguing that we need to understand Know Nothing rhetoric and activism as part of a wider tradition of American suspicion of "politics as usual" -- even though, of course, this antipartyism served agendas that included those of self-interested figures seeking to accumulate power.
Main Description
Captivating disgruntled voters, third parties have often complicated the American political scene. In the years before the Civil War, third-party politics took the form of the Know Nothings, who mistrusted established parties and gave voice to anti-government sentiment. Originating about 1850 as a nativist fraternal order, the Know Nothing movement soon spread throughout the industrial North. In Beyond Party , Mark Voss-Hubbard draws on local sources in three different states where the movement was especially strong to uncover its social roots and establish its relationship to actual public policy issues. Focusing on the 1852 ten hour movement in Essex County, Massachusetts, the pro-temperance and anti-Catholic agitation in and around Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and the movement to restrict immigrants' voting rights and overthrow "corrupt parties and politicians" in New London County, Connecticut, he shows that these places shared many of the social problems that occurred throughout the North -- the consolidation of capitalist agriculture and industry, the arrival of Irish and German Catholic immigrants, and the changing fortunes of many established political leaders. Voss-Hubbard applies the insights of social history and social movement theory to politics in arguing that we need to understand Know Nothing rhetoric and activism as part of a wider tradition of American suspicion of "politics as usual" -- even though, of course, this antipartyism served agendas that included those of self-interested figures seeking to accumulate power.
Main Description
Captivating disgruntled voters, third parties have often complicated the American political scene. In the years before the Civil War, third-party politics took the form of the Know Nothings, who mistrusted established parties and gave voice to anti-government sentiment. Originating about 1850 as a nativist fraternal order, the Know Nothing movement soon spread throughout the industrial North. In Beyond Party, Mark Voss-Hubbard draws on local sources in three different states where the movement was especially strong to uncover its social roots and establish its relationship to actual public policy issues. Focusing on the 1852 ten hour movement in Essex County, Massachusetts, the pro-temperance and anti-Catholic agitation in and around Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, and the movement to restrict immigrants' voting rights and overthrow "corrupt parties and politicians" in New London County, Connecticut, he shows that these places shared many of the social problems that occurred throughout the North--the consolidation of capitalist agriculture and industry, the arrival of Irish and German Catholic immigrants, and the changing fortunes of many established political leaders. Voss-Hubbard applies the insights of social history and social movement theory to politics in arguing that we need to understand Know Nothing rhetoric and activism as part of a wider tradition of American suspicion of "politics as usual"--even though, of course, this antipartyism served agendas that included those of self-interested figures seeking to accumulate power.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Contexts
Society and Economyp. 17
Cultures of Public Lifep. 38
Political Alternatives
Political Innovators: Roots of Insurgent Politicsp. 71
"A Sudden and Sweeping Hostility to the Old Parties": Know Nothing Political Culturep. 105
Political Continuities
The Many Faces of Gracchus: Know Nothing Governmentp. 141
North Americanism and the Republican Ascendancep. 178
Appendixp. 217
Notesp. 221
Essay on Sourcesp. 253
Indexp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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