Catalogue


Haitian revolutionary studies /
David Patrick Geggus.
imprint
Bloomington, Ind. : Indiana University Press, c2002.
description
xii, 334 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0253341043 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
series title
imprint
Bloomington, Ind. : Indiana University Press, c2002.
isbn
0253341043 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The Haitian revolution -- New approaches and old -- Underexploited sources -- The causation of slave rebellions : an overview -- Marronage, vodou, and the slave revolt of 1791 -- The Bois Caïman ceremony -- The "Swiss" and the problem of slave/free colored cooperation -- The "volte-face" of Toussaint Louverture -- Slave, soldier, rebel : the strange career of Jean Kina -- Racial equality, slavery, and colonial secession during the constituent assembly -- The great powers and the Haitian revolution -- The slave leaders in exile : Spain's resettlement of its black auxiliary troops -- The naming of Haiti.
catalogue key
4749102
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [305]-327) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-03-01:
Only two of the 13 essays in Geggus's specialized examination of large and minor themes in Haiti's revolutionary history are new: his exploration of the so-called Swiss rebel slaves who were armed by free coloreds, and his discussion of the resettlement around the Caribbean of those slaves who allied with Spain against France. The others, which appeared in scholarly and regional journals as long ago as 1980, as well as in a guidebook, have been revised and updated. Together they comprise an important corpus of research on aspects of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1803) and the complementary events that the cataclysm in the French colony precipitated. As Geggus (Univ. of Florida) explicitly and implicitly shows, cataclysm is not too strong a word to describe the slave uprisings and subsequent colonial and anticolonial maneuverings that resulted in the emancipation of 500,000 slaves in one of the most productive and profitable colonies in the world. Geggus asserts that the Haitian Revolution involved "the greatest degree of mass mobilization and brought the greatest degree of social and economic change" of all of the independence struggles in the Americas. His chapters develop and deepen aspects of that generalization. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty. R. I. Rotberg Harvard University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Only two of the 13 essays in Geggus's specialized examination of large and minor themes in Haiti's revolutionary history are new: his exploration of the so-called Swiss rebel slaves who were armed by free coloreds, and his discussion of the resettlement around the Caribbean of those slaves who allied with Spain against France. The others, which appeared in scholarly and regional journals as long ago as 1980, as well as in a guidebook, have been revised and updated. Together they comprise an important corpus of research on aspects of the Haitian Revolution (1791--1803) and the complementary events that the cataclysm in the French colony precipitated. As Geggus (Univ. of Florida) explicitly and implicitly shows, cataclysm is not too strong a word to describe the slave uprisings and subsequent colonial and anticolonial maneuverings that resulted in the emancipation of 500,000 slaves in one of the most productive and profitable colonies in the world. Geggus asserts that the Haitian Revolution involved the greatest degree of mass mobilization and brought the greatest degree of social and economic change of all of the independence struggles in the Americas. His chapters develop and deepen aspects of that generalization. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty." -- R. I. Rotberg, Harvard University, Choice, March 2003
"Only two of the 13 essays in Geggus's specialized examination of large and minor themes in Haiti's revolutionary history are new: his exploration of the so-called Swiss rebel slaves who were armed by free coloreds, and his discussion of the resettlement around the Caribbean of those slaves who allied with Spain against France. The others, which appeared in scholarly and regional journals as long ago as 1980, as well as in a guidebook, have been revised and updated. Together they comprise an important corpus of research on aspects of the Haitian Revolution (1791-1803) and the complementary events that the cataclysm in the French colony precipitated. As Geggus (Univ. of Florida) explicitly and implicitly shows, cataclysm is not too strong a word to describe the slave uprisings and subsequent colonial and anticolonial maneuverings that resulted in the emancipation of 500,000 slaves in one of the most productive and profitable colonies in the world. Geggus asserts that the Haitian Revolution involved the greatest degree of mass mobilization and brought the greatest degree of social and economic change of all of the independence struggles in the Americas. His chapters develop and deepen aspects of that generalization. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and faculty." -R. I. Rotberg, Harvard University, Choice, March 2003
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
The Haitian Revolution of 1789--1803 transformed the Caribbean's wealthiest colony into the first independent state in Latin America, encompassed the largest slave uprising in the Americas, and inflicted a humiliating defeat on three colonial powers. In Haitian Revolutionary Studies, David Patrick Geggus sheds new light on this tremendous upheaval by marshaling an unprecedented range of evidence drawn from archival research in six countries. Geggus's fine-grained essays explore central issues and little-studied aspects of the conflict, including new historiography and sources, the origins of the black rebellion, and relations between slaves and free people of color. The contributions of vodou and marronage to the slave uprising, Toussaint Louverture and the abolition question, the policies of the major powers toward the revolution, and its interaction with the early French Revolution are also addressed. Questions about ethnicity, identity, and historical knowledge inform this essential study of a complex revolution.
Main Description
The Haitian Revolution of 1789-1803 transformed the Caribbean's wealthiest colony into the first independent state in Latin America, encompassed the largest slave uprising in the Americas, and inflicted a humiliating defeat on three colonial powers. In Haitian Revolutionary Studies, David Patrick Geggus sheds new light on this tremendous upheaval by marshaling an unprecedented range of evidence drawn from archival research in six countries. Geggus's fine-grained essays explore central issues and little-studied aspects of the conflict, including new historiography and sources, the origins of the black rebellion, and relations between slaves and free people of color. The contributions of vodou and marronage to the slave uprising, Toussaint Louverture and the abolition question, the policies of the major powers toward the revolution, and its interaction with the early French Revolution are also addressed. Questions about ethnicity, identity, and historical knowledge inform this essential study of a complex revolution.
Main Description
The Haitian Revolution of 1789-1803 transformed the Caribbean's wealthiest colony into the first independent state in Latin America. It encompassed the largest slave uprising in the Americas and inflicted a humiliating defeat on the three main colonial powers - France, Britain, and Spain. In Haitian Revolutionary Studies, David Patrick Geggus sheds new light on this tremendous upheaval by marshalling an unprecedented range of evidence drawn from archival research in a half-dozen countries. Together with a narrative overview, Geggus's thirteen fine-grained essays explore central issues and little-studied aspects of the conflict including new historiography and sources, the origins of the black rebellion, relations between slaves and free people of colour, international repercussions, and the naming of the new state. Major topics discussed are the contributions of vodou and marronage to the slave uprising, Toussaint Louverture and the abolition question, the policies of the major powers toward the revolution, and its interaction with the early French Revolution. Among the more unusual issues investigated are black counterrevolutionaries and resettlement of the insurgent leaders in Latin America. Questions about ethnicity, identity, and historical knowledge are raised in an investigation of why the first modern black state was given an Amerindian name. For scholars and students of Latin American and African American history, Haitian Revolutionary Studies makes a major contribution to understandings of a complex revolution.
Table of Contents
Preliminary
Preface
Acknowledgements
Overview
The Haitian Revolution
Historiography and Sources
New Approaches and Old
Underexploited Sources
The Seeds of Revolt
The Causation of Slave Rebellions: An Overview
Marronage, Vodou, and the Slave Revolt of 1791
The Bois Ca-man Ceremony
Slaves and Free Coloreds
The "Swiss" and the Problem of Slave Free Colored Cooperation
The "Volte-Face" of Toussaint Louverture
Slave, Soldier, Rebel: The Strange Career of Jean Kina
The Wider Revolution
Racial Equality, Slavery, and Colonial Secession during the Constituent Assembly
The Great Powers and the Haitian Revolution
The Slave Leaders in Exile: Spain's Resettlement of Its Black Auxiliary Troops
Epilogue
The Naming of Haiti
Chronology
Notes
Works Cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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