Catalogue

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Ojibway tales /
Basil Johnston.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1993], c1978.
description
188 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803275781 (pa : alk. paper) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [1993], c1978.
isbn
0803275781 (pa : alk. paper) :
general note
"Originally published: Moose meat & wild rice. Toronto : McClelland and Stewart, 1978" -- verso of t.p.
catalogue key
4740833
 
Gift; McClelland & Stewart; 2009; RB321355.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"What makes Ojibway Tales worth reading is the humor. It is a wonderfully communal humor that is delightful and at the same time powerful."Thomas King, author of Medicine River and Green Grass, Running Water
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Summaries
Main Description
The Ojibway Indians' sense of humor sparkles through these stories set on the fictional Moose Meat Point Indian Reserve, connected by a dirt road to the town of Blunder Bay. If some of them seem "farfetched and even implausible," Basil L. Johnston writes, "it is simply because human beings very often act and conduct their affairs and those of others in an absurd manner." These twenty-two stories were originally collected under the title Moose Meat and Wild Rice . Among the most memorable of the stories is "They Don't Want No Indians," in which all attempts are made to circumvent bureaucratic red tape and transport a dead Indian to his home for burial. One of the funniest is "Indian Smart: Moose Smart," which pits a moose in a lake against six Moose Meaters in two canoes. "If You Want to Play" and "Secular Revenge" are the result of misunderstanding or imperfect communication. Still other stories, like "What Is Sin?" and "The Kiss and the Moonshine," reveal the clash of different cultural approaches. All show the warm-heartedness and good will of the Ojibway Indians. If they are gently satirized, so are the whites who would change them, and with good reason. Government ineptitude and rigid piety are foisted on the Moose Meaters, who have only thirty thousand acres to move around in.
Main Description
The Ojibway Indians' sense of humor sparkles through these stories set on the fictional Moose Meat Point Indian Reserve, connected by a dirt road to the town of Blunder Bay. If some of them seem "farfetched and even implausible," Basil L. Johnston writes, "it is simply because human beings very often act and conduct their affairs and those of others in an absurd manner." These twenty-two stories were originally collected under the titleMoose Meat and Wild Rice. Among the most memorable of the stories is "They Don't Want No Indians," in which all attempts are made to circumvent bureaucratic red tape and transport a dead Indian to his home for burial. One of the funniest is "Indian Smart: Moose Smart," which pits a moose in a lake against six Moose Meaters in two canoes. "If You Want to Play" and "Secular Revenge" are the result of misunderstanding or imperfect communication. Still other stories, like "What Is Sin?" and "The Kiss and the Moonshine," reveal the clash of different cultural approaches. All show the warm-heartedness and good will of the Ojibway Indians. If they are gently satirized, so are the whites who would change them, and with good reason. Government ineptitude and rigid piety are foisted on the Moose Meaters, who have only thirty thousand acres to move around in.
Unpaid Annotation
The Ojibway Indians' sense of humor sparkles through these stories set on the fictional Moose Meat Point Indian Reserve, connected by a dirt road to the town of Blunder Bay. If some of them seem "far-fetched and even implausible", Basil L. Johnston writes, "it is simply because human beings very often act and conduct their affairs and those of others in an absurd manner". These twenty-two stories were originally collected under the title Moose Meat and Wild Rice. Among the most memorable of the stories is "They Don't Want No Indians", in which all attempts are made to circumvent bureaucratic red tape and transport a dead Indian to his home for burial. One of the funniest is "Indian Smart: Moose Smart", which pits a moose in a lake against six Moose Meaters in two canoes. "If You Want to Play" and "Secular Revenge" are the result of misunderstanding or imperfect communication. Still other stories, like "What Is Sin?" and "The Kiss and the Moonshine", reveal the clash of different cultural approaches. All show the warm-heartedness and good will of the Ojibway Indians. If they are gently satirized, so are the whites who would change them, and with good reason. Government ineptitude and rigid piety foisted on the Moose Meaters, who have only thirty thousand acres to move around in.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 7
The Resourcefulness of the Moose Meat Point Ojibway
Indian Smart: Moose Smartp. 13
"If You Want to Play"p. 19
The Honey Potp. 26
The Potatoes Musta Fell Outp. 32
In a Pig's Eyep. 37
You Can Have Her: I Don't Want Herp. 42
Christianity, Religion and Worship at Moose Meat Point
The Miraclep. 51
Yellow Cloud's Battle With the Spiritsp. 57
Don't Make Fun of Old Beliefsp. 65
What is Sin?p. 72
Secular Revengep. 80
The Root of Evilp. 85
The Power of Prayerp. 90
Nearer My God to Theep. 96
The Weddingp. 100
Getting Along and Ahead Outside the Reserve
How Would You Like Your Eggs?p. 113
Don't Call Me No Name!p. 120
Good Thing We Know Them Peoplep. 125
They Don't Want No Indiansp. 130
Can I See the President?p. 141
With Housing, Education and Business ... Poof!
Big Businessp. 151
The Kiss and the Moonshinep. 158
A Sign of the Timesp. 168
Epiloguep. 187
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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