Catalogue


Women, death, and literature in post-Reformation England /
Patricia Phillippy.
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
ix, 311 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0521814898
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, U.K. ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
0521814898
catalogue key
4738709
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Patricia Phillippy is Associate Professor of English at Texas A & M University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-03-01:
Protestant thinkers associated with Catholicism what they saw as the overindulgence of women's mourning. In this learned, wide-ranging volume, Phillippy (Texas A&M Univ.) argues that efforts to limit these emotional exercises opened space for renewed and invigorated responses to death among women in early modern England. In discussing her thesis of women's empowerment, the author combines fascinating pieces of history involving embalming, tomb sculpture, and inheritance with the literature of consolation and mourning. The study would have benefited from the pruning of repetitious formulations; at times it threatens to separate into pages of antiquarian lore on the one hand and paragraphs of jargonish interpretation on the other. A typical formulation: "This transgressive quality of women's mourning, which threatens to expose the structures upon which gendered discourses of grief and, by extension, gendered subjects are constructed, is a continual object of policing in male reformers' condemnations of feminine lamentational excesses, and a vital source of energy and empowerment in women's expressions of loss." But Phillippy offers good comments on texts by Aemilia Lanyer and Rachel Speght, and on many other topics; her book will repay the attention of scholars of Elizabethan and Stuart literature and culture. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students, researchers, faculty, and the occasional upper-division undergraduate. E. D. Hill Mount Holyoke College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This learned and stimulating book has much to offer both literary critics and cultural historians of early modern England." Renaissance Quarterly
"Phillippy illuminates the complexity of interacting forces contributing both to the development of gendered norms and to the opportunities they could provide to early modern women. This is a thoughtful, creative study...Phillippy is impressive in her historicist approach to her chosen texts...Her book's value...also lies in its eclecticism. It will surely stimulate future scholarship following different trajectories. This complex, careful, and wide-ranging work will appeal to a broad, if advanced audience, while also serving as a corrective to more simplistic explorations of the relationship between gendered norms, historical context, and cultural expression." Megan L. Hickerson, King's College, London, Canadian Journal of History
"...wide-ranging and perceptive...The book is a stimulating and original contribution to a fast-growing field in need of the kinds of directions laid out so clearly and elegantly here...Women, Death and Literature is clearly written, well researched, and beautifully produced - it is a pleasure to use. Patricia Phillippy has written a very good book indeed, one to which early modern scholars will be indebted for many years to come." Albion
"Impeccably researched and impressively detailed [...] Phillippy makes a rewarding contribution to intellectual history." Studies in English Literature
"Patricia Phillippy's study is recommended for its breadth, its conceptual clarity, and its engagement with complex and subtle aspects of cultural history, gender studies, and, more marginally, biography." Biography
"[Phillippy] excavates valuable and wide-ranging documents on women's involvement in death and dying, and carefully distinguishes between women's self-representations and other cultural constructions. Moreover, she maintains a carefully nuanced understanding of public and private roles often oversimplified in studies of early modern women's lives and works....Phillippy offers a valuable model for historicizing affect and provides an important service for literary critics and historians of the early modern period through her extensive archival research." H-WOMEN
"In discussing her thesis of women's empwerment, the author combines fascinating pieces of history involving embalming, tomb sculpture, and inheritance with the literature of consolation and mourning.... Phillippy offers good comments on texts by Ameilia Lanyer and Rachel Speght, and on many other topics; her book will repay the attention of scholars of Elizabethan and Stuart literature and culture." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Phillippy examines the crucial literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period.
Description for Bookstore
In Women, Death and Literature in Post-Reformation England Patricia Phillippy examines the crucial literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period. By examining early modern funerary, liturgical, and lamentational practices, as well as diaries, poems and plays, she illustrates the consistent gendering of rival styles of grief in post-Reformation England. Phillippy calls on a wide range of published and archival material that date from the Reformation to the seventeenth century, providing a study that will appeal to cultural and literary historians.
Description for Bookstore
Phillippy examines the literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period. She calls on a wide range of published and archival material that date from the Reformation to the seventeenth century, providing a study that will appeal to cultural and literary historians.
Main Description
Patricia Phillippy examines the crucial literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period. Using funerary, liturgical, and lamentational practices; as well as diaries, poems and plays; she illustrates the consistent gendering of rival styles of grief in post-Reformation England. Phillippy utilizes a wide range of published and archival material dating from the Reformation to the seventeenth century, to provide a study of appeal to cultural and literary historians.
Main Description
In Women, Death and Literature in Post-Reformation England Patricia Phillippy examines the crucial literal and figurative roles played by women in death and mourning during the early modern period. By examining early modern funerary, liturgical, and lamentational practices, as well as diaries, poems and plays, she illustrates the consistent gendering of rival styles of grief in post-Reformation England. Phillippy emphasises the period's textual and cultural constructions of male and female subjects as predicated upon gendered approaches to death. She argues that while feminine grief is condemned as immoderately emotional by male reformers, the same characteristic that opens women's mourning to censure enable its use as a means of empowering women's speech. Phillippy calls on a wide range of published and archival material that date from the Reformation to well into the seventeenth century, providing a study that will appeal to cultural as well as literary historians.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. x
Introductionp. 1
A map of deathp. 15
Disposing of the Bodyp. 49
The body of history: embalming and historiography in Shakespeare's Henry VIIIp. 54
Humility and stoutness: the lives and deaths of Christian womenp. 81
London's mourning garment: maternity, mourning, and succession in Shakespeare's Richard IIIp. 109
Sisters of Magdalenep. 139
"I might againe have been the Sepulcure": maternal mourning and the encrypted corpsep. 143
"Quod licuit feci": Elizabeth Russell and the power of public mourningp. 179
The mat(t)er of death: the defense of Eve and the female ars moriendip. 211
Codicil: "a web of blacke"p. 242
Notesp. 247
Bibliographyp. 284
Indexp. 305
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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