Catalogue


The Crimean Tatars : the diaspora experience and the forging of a nation /
by Brian Glyn Williams.
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2001.
description
xxvii, 488 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9004121226 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Leiden ; Boston : Brill, 2001.
isbn
9004121226 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4730599
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [465]-483) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-02-01:
This outstanding, thoroughly researched, and clearly presented volume focuses on the Crimean Tatars' traumatic history of migration and exile under tsars and Soviet rule. Williams (Univ. of London) traces the historical process of the transformation of a traditional Muslim community of peasants into a politically mobilized secular nation with a well-defined national identity strongly attached to its Crimean homeland. The author also describes the gradual construction of Crimea as "Fatherland" by the Crimean Tatars. Williams compares the Crimean Tatars' mass and brutal deportation by Stalin in 1944 with similar traumas suffered by Armenians and Jews. The author derived much material from visits to Crimean Tatar communities in Central Asia and Crimea and interviews with Crimean Tatars from Turkey and the US, 1997-99. Basically, "this work is the ethno-history of a small community ..., scattered over time and space." Williams covers the Crimean Tatars' history chronologically from their ethnogenesis in the pre-Mongol era right up to the present after being freed from Soviet rule. Enhancing the volume are numerous illustrations of people and places; a series of maps; a complete glossary; and a bibliography of works in Russian, Turkish, and various Western languages. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. MacKenzie emeritus, University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Reviews
Review Quotes
' ...this book makes for engrossing reading…of great interest to anyone working in the fields of diaspora research, identity construction, nationality studies, and of course Russian, Soviet, Turkish, Ottoman, or East European history.'Anna Oldfield Senarlsan, Central Eurasian Studies Review, 2004.' This outstanding, thoroughly researched, and clearly presented volume focuses on the Crimean Tatars traumatic history of migration and exile under tsars and Soviet rule.'D. MacKenzie, Choice.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
Taking as its starting point the ethnogenesis of this ethnic group during the Mongol period (13th century), this volume traces their history through Islam, the Ottoman and the Russian Empires (15th and 17th century). The author discusses how Islam, Russian colonial policies and indigenous national movements shaped the collective identity of this victimized ethnic group. Part two deals with the role of forced migration during the Russian colonial period, Soviet nation-building policies and ethnic cleansing in shaping this peoples modern national identity. This work therefore also has wider applications for those dealing with the construction of diasporic identities. Taking a comparative approach, it traces the formation of Crimean Tatar diasporas in the Ottoman Balkans, Republican Turkey, and Soviet Central Asia (from 1944). A theme which emerges through the work is the gradual construction of the Crimea as a national homeland by its indigenous Tatar population. It ends with a discussion of the post-Soviet repatriation of the Crimean Tatars to their Russified homeland and the social and identity problems involved.
Description for Reader
Those interested in ethnicity and nationalism in the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union and post-Soviet Eurasia, the Ottoman Empire in the Balkans and the Republic of Turkey, as well as those interested in comparative diaspora studies, political science, political geography and history.
Main Description
This volume provides the most up-to-date analysis of the ethnic cleansing of the Crimean Tatars, their exile in Central Asia and their struggle to return to the Crimean homeland. It also traces the formation of this diaspora nation from Mongol times to the collapse of the Soviet Union. A theme which emerges through the work is the gradual construction of the Crimea as a national homeland by its indigenous Tatar population. It ends with a discussion of the post-Soviet repatriation of the Crimean Tatars to their Russified homeland and the social, emotional and identity problems involved.
Unpaid Annotation
Taking as its starting point the ethnogenesis of this ethnic group during the Mongol period (13th century), this volume traces their history through Islam, the Ottoman and the Russian Empires (15th and 17th century). The author discusses how Islam, Russian colonial policies and indigenous national movements shaped the collective identity of this victimized ethnic group. Part two deals with the role of forced migration during the Russian colonial period, Soviet nation-building policies and ethnic cleansing in shaping this people's modern national identity. This work therefore also has wider applications "for those dealing with the construction of diasporic identities. Taking a comparative approach, it traces the formation of Crimean Tatar diasporas in the Ottoman Balkans, Republican Turkey, and Soviet Central Asia (from 1944). A theme which emerges through the work is the gradual construction of the Crimea as a national homeland by its indigenous Tatar population. It ends with a discussionof the post-Soviet repatriation of the Crimean Tatars to their Russified homeland and the social and identity problems involved.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
List of illustrations
Glossary
Maps
Introduction. The Crimean Tatars as a Case Study in Ethno-Nationalism and Group Displacementp. 1
Origins. The 'Ethnogenesis' of the Tatars of the Crimeap. 7
Dar al-Islam. The Crimean Tatars from Mehmed the Conqueror to Catherine the Greatp. 39
The Pearl in the Tsar's Crown. The Crimean Land and People under Russiap. 73
Dispossession. The Loss of the Crimean Homelandp. 111
Dar al-Harb. The 19th Century Crimean Tatar Migrations to the Ottoman Empirep. 139
Signs and Portents. The Tatars of the Crimea in the Aftermath of the Migration of 1860p. 172
Ak Toprak. The Formation of the Crimean Tatar Communities of the Caucasus, Bulgaria and Romaniap. 196
The Great Retreat. The Formation of the Crimean Tatar Diaspora in Turkeyp. 227
Yesil Ada. The Construction of Tatar Diasporic Identity in Bulgaria and Romaniap. 279
Vatan. The Construction of the Crimean Tatar Homelandp. 301
Soviet Homeland. The Nationalization of Crimean Tatar Identity in the USSRp. 334
Surgun. The Crimean Tatar Exile in Central Asiap. 374
Return. The Post-Soviet Crimean Tatar Migrations from Central Asia to the Crimeap. 411
Bibliographyp. 465
Indexp. 485
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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