Catalogue


Crucible of power : a history of American foreign relations to 1913 /
Howard Jones.
imprint
Wilmington, Del. : SR Books, 2002.
description
xii, 309 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0842029168 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Wilmington, Del. : SR Books, 2002.
isbn
0842029168 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4726417
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Howard Jones is University Research Professor in the Department of History
Reviews
Review Quotes
A readable and comprehensive survey of American foreign policy from the time of independence to the eve of World War I. Jones interweaves traditional security and economic themes with the domestic considerations that drove the decisions of U.S. policymakers. At the same time, he reminds readers about U.S. idealism ”the nation's confidence in its own system and society ”that contributed to the making of a world's leader.
Historians will welcome Jones's approach, one that evenhandedly addresses but does not belabor historiographical debates, but one that also gives more than just the facts. The survey provides context, analysis of the good and the bad, and a non-compartmentalized look at issues, people, and events. Jones demonstrates that, from Tom Paine to Teddy Roosevelt, Americans were concerned with surviving in a dangerous world by building and exercising power abroad.
Howard Jones draws on his remarkable breadth as a historian of U.S. foreign relations to produce a distinguished survey of America's growth from an emerging power in the 1890s to its present-day position of global preeminence. His exposition is precise; his sources, exhaustive; his illustrations, revealing; his arguments, lucid. Professor Jones fully recognizes the complexity, inconsistency, and idiosyncrasy that is the hallmark of America's engagement with the world, yet his presentation navigates a century of international rapids with an ease that students will welcome and with an authority that instructors will appreciate.
Howard Jones has written a definitive history of American foreign relations before 1913. He reminds us once again that U.S. foreign policy did not begin in 1898 as he develops a narrative that is detailed but never boring. Those often forgotten years come alive as he moves from the uncertain nation of 1783 to the powerful one of 1913.
In a volume characteristic of his broad-ranging and important scholarship on U.S. foreign relations, Professor Jones has written a comprehensive, tempered, and highly accessible narrative account of the nation's twentieth-century international involvements. While demonstrating the complexities facing U.S. policymakers and the limitations on their choices and actions, Jones offers a balanced and probing assessment of their successes and failures.
It is a pleasure to see the publication of Howard Jones's history of American foreign relations. The author has drawn from his own impressive contributions to illuminate the often neglected role of diplomacy in the nineteenth century. This well-written and well-balanced book merits the attention of all students of American foreign relations.
Straightforward and direct, Crucible of Power: A History of American Foreign Relations from 1897 provides students with an accessible means for gaining entr e into the history of American foreign relations. It also shows some of the distinctive aspects of American statecraft, notably a concern for the impact of economic and strategic realities, as well as an ideological commitment in defense of national ideals and human rights. The author's balanced approach is exemplary.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Crucible of Power: A History of American Foreign Relations to 1913 presents a straightforward, balanced, and comprehensive history of American international relations from the American Revolution to 1913. This core text demonstrates the complexities of the decision-making process that led to the rise and decline of the United States (relative to the ascent of other nations) in world power status. Howard Jones focuses on the personalities, security interests, and expansionist tendencies behind the formulation and implementation of U.S. foreign policy and highlights the intimate relationship between foreign and domestic policy. Students will gain an understanding of the historical antecedents of the nation's twentieth-century foreign policy. This volume relies on the natural chronology of historical events to organize and narrate the story as the nation's leaders saw it. Jones uncovers the tangled and often confusing nature of foreign affairs by taking the narrative approach and does not create the illusion that American foreign relations took place in a well-ordered fashion. This book will help students understand the plight of present-day policymakers who encounter an array of problems that are rarely susceptible to simple analysis and ready solution. Two-color format is used to make the text more visually appealing and easier to read. Maps provide easy reference and important context, and photographs make the book more visually exciting. Each chapter ends with a list of suggested readings, giving students additional resources for exploration and research. This text is ideal for American diplomatic history survey courses and courses on American foreign policy from the American Revolution to the present.
Main Description
Crucible of Power: A History of American Foreign Relations to 1913 presents a straightforward, balanced, and comprehensive history of American international relations from the American Revolution to 1913. This core text demonstrates the complexities of the decision-making process that led to the rise and decline of the United States (relative to the ascent of other nations) in world power status. This volume relies on the natural chronology of historical events to organize and narrate the story as the nation's leaders saw it. It will help students understand the plight of present-day policymakers who encounter an array of problems that are rarely susceptible to simple analysis and ready solution. This text is ideal for American diplomatic history survey courses and courses on American foreign policy from the American Revolution to the present.
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. x
Prefacep. xi
The Revolutionary Beginnings of American Foreign Policy, 1775-1789p. 1
The Federalist Era and the Wars of the French Revolution, 1789-1801p. 28
Jeffersonian Diplomacy, 1801-1809p. 48
The War of 1812 and the Completion of American Independence, 1809-1817p. 70
The Diplomacy of Hemispheric Order, 1817-1825p. 89
To the Webster-Ashburton Treaty, 1825-1842p. 112
Destiny and Annexation: Oregon, Texas, and the Mexican War, 1842-1848p. 136
Between the Wars, 1848-1861: Young America and the Paradox of Slavery and Freedomp. 165
The Civil War, 1861-1865p. 188
Prelude to American Imperialism, 1865-1897p. 221
U.S. Imperialism and the New Manifest Destiny, 1897-1900p. 244
Theodore Roosevelt and the Search for World Order, 1900-1913p. 271
Indexp. 297
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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