Catalogue


A theory of physical probability /
Richard Johns.
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2002.
description
vi, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0802036031 (bound) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, c2002.
isbn
0802036031 (bound) :
catalogue key
4720785
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Richard Johns teaches in the Department of Philosophy, University of British Columbia.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Reader
In a random process, later events seem to be loosely attached to earlier ones; in other words, a substantial or tight relationship between the two is missing. This relationship is sometimes held to be the relation of cause and effect, so that random events are not caused by what preceded them. Richard Johns, however, adopts the original stance that random events are fully caused and lack only determination by their causes; according to his causal theory of chance, the physical chance of an event is the degree to which the event is determined by its causes. A Theory of Physical Probabilityaddresses an important and, until now, poorly comprehended topic: chance, or physical probability. It puts forth Johns's theory of physical chance and demonstrates the implications of this theory in various areas of physics. Johns's is a novel approach to a fundamental topic in such disciplines as philosophy, philosophy of science, and physics, and it will be widely admired by scholars for its clarity and accessibility.
Description for Reader
In a random process, later events seem to be loosely attached to earlier ones; in other words, a substantial or tight relationship between the two is missing. This relationship is sometimes held to be the relation of cause and effect, so that random events are not caused by what preceded them. Richard Johns, however, adopts the original stance that random events are fully caused and lack only determination by their causes; according to his causal theory of chance, the physical chance of an event is the degree to which the event is determined by its causes.A Theory of Physical Probabilityaddresses an important and, until now, poorly comprehended topic: chance, or physical probability. It puts forth Johns's theory of physical chance and demonstrates the implications of this theory in various areas of physics. Johns's is a novel approach to a fundamental topic in such disciplines as philosophy, philosophy of science, and physics, and it will be widely admired by scholars for its clarity and accessibility.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
Motivation for the Causal Theory of Chancep. 3
Problems for the Causal Theoryp. 5
Advantages of the Causal Theoryp. 5
Overview of the Bookp. 6
Logic and Probabilityp. 9
The Objections to Logical Probabilityp. 10
The Nature of Logical Probabilityp. 13
Measuring Degrees of Beliefp. 29
The Axioms of Probabilityp. 33
Relative Probabilitiesp. 36
Interval Probabilitiesp. 37
The Symmetry Axiomp. 38
Causation and Determinationp. 53
Causationp. 53
Determinationp. 64
How Are Causation and Determination Related?p. 70
Physical Chancep. 84
The Definition of Chancep. 84
Chance Is Relativized to a Systemp. 87
Lewis's Objectionsp. 88
A Proof of Miller's Principlep. 89
The Objections of Howson and Urbachp. 90
Chance and Relative Frequencyp. 91
Frequency Theories of Probabilityp. 96
Conditional Chancesp. 106
Classical Stochastic Mechanicsp. 109
What Is CSM Good for?p. 109
The Law Functionp. 110
Relevance and Correlationp. 114
Chance in a Composite Systemp. 118
Sub-histories, States, and Markov Systemsp. 121
Boundary Conditions and Timep. 123
The Arrow of Timep. 133
Correlationp. 148
Classical and Quantum Correlationp. 149
Reactions to EPRp. 167
Beyond Postulate CSM3p. 181
The State Vectorp. 188
The Problemp. 188
Large and Small Systemsp. 206
Chance for Small Systemsp. 220
Summaryp. 230
Conclusionp. 233
Notesp. 235
Bibliographyp. 245
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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