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Surviving the Confederacy : rebellion, ruin, and recovery : Roger and Sara Pryor during the Civil War /
John C. Waugh.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Harcourt, c2002.
description
447 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
0151003890
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Harcourt, c2002.
isbn
0151003890
contents note
Roger -- Sara -- Harry Hotspur and the Washington Belle -- The fire-eater -- Coming untied -- Strike a blow! -- Cradle days of the Confederacy -- Sewing for the Rebellion -- A message from the guns -- Seeing the elephant -- Somebody's darling -- Marching with Lee -- Alone in the blackwater -- A bizarre resignation -- War at the door -- In the cannon's mouth -- The riderless horse -- The tightening noose -- The northern Bastille -- Death knell -- Shattered lives -- Into the arms of the enemy -- The sweetheart of my life.
catalogue key
4718803
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
John C. Waugh is the award-winning author of four other books about the Civil War. A former bureau chief of the Christian Science Monitor, his writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, the Washington Post, and the Civil War Times Illustrated. He lives in Pantego, Texas
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
CHAPTER 1 Roger Nottoway Court House was a serene, prosperous little southside Virginia village and county seat. It was cocooned in a deep and placid nineteenth-century tranquility that was disordered only on court days or by political meetings on the town square. Any new mechanical wonder imported by a local planter was a bugle blast in an otherwise church-quiet existence.6 It lay on the banks of the Nottoway River in Nottoway County 67 miles southwest of Richmond and 189 miles from the Federal capital in Washington. The stage from Petersburg bound for North Carolina rolled through daily. The village counted fifteen dwellings, one mercantile house, one hotel, a saddler, a tailor, a blacksmith shop, and a population of seventy people, including a physician and a lawyer. Supplementing the courthouse was a clerk's office and a jail for debtors and criminals, and there was a flour mill on the river. The town, the river, and the county were named alike for a tribe of Virginia Indians long since displaced.7 There, in the town where his father was the Presbyterian pastor at Shiloh Church, Roger Atkinson Pryor grew up. On his father's side Roger descended from two long and upstanding ancestral lines, the Blands and the Pryors, both deep-rooted in the old Virginia gentry and with strong pedigrees in revolution and politics.8 The Blands could look back on nearly two centuries as landed gentry in young America, to the year Theodorick Bland purchased an estate on the James River in 1654. In both fortune and understanding this first Bland was said to be inferior to no man of his time in the country, that "with his personal graces, his literary accomplishments, and his distinguished career," he was "a brilliant star set in the early skies of Virginia history," a star that gleamed brightly as one of the King's Council for the colonial commonwealth.9 As the Bland line eddied and branched down through succeeding generations, it produced an abundance of Theodoricks and Richards, many of them estimable men in their time and place. One of the Richards was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates and a political writer and thinker of the first rank. It was said of him that "his intellectual calibre was capacious, his education finished, his habits of application indefatigable." His distinguished contemporary Thomas Jefferson thought him "the wisest man south of James River."10 He was seen as "staunch and tough as whitleather" with "something the look of old parchments, which he handleth and studieth much."11 That "whitleather" Richard had a nephew named Theodorick, another brilliant star in the Bland line, one of the first patriots to rouse the colonies to resistance against the British in the Revolution. Born about 1742, the only son among several daughters and delicate in health from birth, he was sent at age eleven to England for an education. He returned to Virginia more than a decade later as a physician, one of the first Virginians to devote himself to the study of medicine. By 1771 his frail constitution had turned his aspirations into longings for the rural life of a planter, with its quiet, peaceful seclusion and studious repose-a "sighing for some sequestered Abyssinian happy valley."12 But Revolution loomed, and that did not lend itself to tranquility. So he went to war instead, a captain of the first troop of Virginia cavalry and then a colonel of the First Continental Dragoons. He fought at Brandywine and later commanded the post at Charlottesville. George Washington thought well of him, and he was a friend of Thomas Jefferson, of the Marquis de Lafayette, and of Patrick Henry. That same Theodorick became a member of the Virginia convention that met in June 1788, after the Revolution, to ratify a new constitution for the confederation of states. He voted against the Constitution, believing it repugnant to the interests of his country. But when it was adopted over his opposition, he was electe
First Chapter

CHAPTER 1
Roger
Nottoway Court House was a serene, prosperous little southside Virginia village and county seat. It was cocooned in a deep and placid nineteenth-century tranquility that was disordered only on court days or by political meetings on the town square. Any new mechanical wonder imported by a local planter was a bugle blast in an otherwise church-quiet existence.6
It lay on the banks of the Nottoway River in Nottoway County 67 miles southwest of Richmond and 189 miles from the Federal capital in Washington. The stage from Petersburg bound for North Carolina rolled through daily. The village counted fifteen dwellings, one mercantile house, one hotel, a saddler, a tailor, a blacksmith shop, and a population of seventy people, including a physician and a lawyer. Supplementing the courthouse was a clerk's office and a jail for debtors and criminals, and there was a flour mill on the river. The town, the river, and the county were named alike for a tribe of Virginia Indians long since displaced.7
There, in the town where his father was the Presbyterian pastor at Shiloh Church, Roger Atkinson Pryor grew up.
On his father's side Roger descended from two long and upstanding ancestral lines, the Blands and the Pryors, both deep-rooted in the old Virginia gentry and with strong pedigrees in revolution and politics.8 The Blands could look back on nearly two centuries as landed gentry in young America, to the year Theodorick Bland purchased an estate on the James River in 1654. In both fortune and understanding this first Bland was said to be inferior to no man of his time in the country, that "with his personal graces, his literary accomplishments, and his distinguished career," he was "a brilliant star set in the early skies of Virginia history," a star that gleamed brightly as one of the King's Council for the colonial commonwealth.9
As the Bland line eddied and branched down through succeeding generations, it produced an abundance of Theodoricks and Richards, many of them estimable men in their time and place. One of the Richards was a member of the Virginia House of Delegates and a political writer and thinker of the first rank. It was said of him that "his intellectual calibre was capacious, his education finished, his habits of application indefatigable." His distinguished contemporary Thomas Jefferson thought him "the wisest man south of James River."10 He was seen as "staunch and tough as whitleather" with "something the look of old parchments, which he handleth and studieth much."11
That "whitleather" Richard had a nephew named Theodorick, another brilliant star in the Bland line, one of the first patriots to rouse the colonies to resistance against the British in the Revolution. Born about 1742, the only son among several daughters and delicate in health from birth, he was sent at age eleven to England for an education. He returned to Virginia more than a decade later as a physician, one of the first Virginians to devote himself to the study of medicine. By 1771 his frail constitution had turned his aspirations into longings for the rural life of a planter, with its quiet, peaceful seclusion and studious repose-a "sighing for some sequestered Abyssinian happy valley."12 But Revolution loomed, and that did not lend itself to tranquility. So he went to war instead, a captain of the first troop of Virginia cavalry and then a colonel of the First Continental Dragoons. He fought at Brandywine and later commanded the post at Charlottesville. George Washington thought well of him, and he was a friend of Thomas Jefferson, of the Marquis de Lafayette, and of Patrick Henry.
That same Theodorick became a member of the Virginia convention that met in June 1788, after the Revolution, to ratify a new constitution for the confederation of states. He voted against the Constitution, believing it repugnant to the interests of his country. But when it was adopted over his opposition, he was elected by his district in Virginia to the first Congress that convened under it. He was never for long permitted to live the life of leisure and serenity he so prized, but was occupied to the end of his forty-eight-year lifetime with unrelieved public service, civil and military. He was described as tall, somewhat corpulent in his later days, and of a noble countenance, his manners being "marked by ease, dignity and well-bred repose." He was seen as "virtuous and enlightened" in character and "estimable for his private worth and respectable for his public services."13 Much the same might be said of other Blands. And as the line branched, it interconnected with other pedigrees of merit in Virginia, such gold-plated names as the Lees and the Randolphs.
The Pryor line was no less blue-blooded than that of the Blands. Pryors had come to Britain from Normandy, with William the Conqueror in 1066. The first Pryor in the New World was John, who came from England in the early 1700s and also became a friend of Patrick Henry. Roger's grandparents, Richard Pryor and Anne Bland, merged the two lines in 1805 and produced yet another Theodorick, the oldest of six sons, who was to become Roger's father.14
Theodorick Pryor's early education was at academies in Dinwiddie and Brunswick Counties. In 1823, when he was eighteen years old, he entered Hampden-Sydney College, a southside Virginia institution of high repute. Patrick Henry had sent seven sons to the college and had been on its board with James Madison. Theodorick graduated in three years with the highest distinction and as a member of that school's elite Union Society. He matriculated to the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, studied law for a year, and became a lawyer.
He then married Lucy Atkinson, who brought to the union yet a third line rich in church, law, literature, and education, and which would give Roger his middle name when he entered the world on July 19, 1828. He was followed soon by a sister, Lucy. But in 1830, when Roger was less than two years old, their mother died.
Too grief stricken to continue in the law, Theodorick entered the Union Theological Seminary at Hampden-Sydney, in 1831, and a year later became an ordained Presbyterian minister and was installed at Shiloh Church. In December that same year, he eased his sorrow with a second wife, Frances Epes, giving Roger and Lucy a new mother, and eventually two stepsisters and a stepbrother.
Theodorick's God-serving life was in the Bland tradition. He said, "To me it is a source of much comfort and of praise, that, in looking up the long line of my forefathers, I find so many Ministers of the Most High God."15 It was true. There had been nearly as many pastors and ministers in his accumulated ancestry as there had been Theodoricks.
One admirer said of Roger's father that he was "a man cast in the mould of which martyrs were made in the olden time, and whether roasted, broiled, or boiled, he would never have yielded one iota in the confession of that faith which he so long held and so strongly defended."16 As a pastor he was considered "eminent for piety, eloquence, and usefulness."17 He was a man of sturdy common sense, who had a strong mind and a way with words. Another admirer said of him that he "fulfills my idea of a model pastor."18
He also fulfilled his family's idea of a model father; they believed that "his life stood for all that was true and fine." Young people confided to him both their joys and sorrows. He made of his home, one of them later wrote, an "atmosphere of culture and true religion," and "there was no excuse for being late for family prayers morning or night." The one noteworthy fault they found in him was his impatient, quickly excited, blunt-speaking nature, a trait he was to hand down to his son.19
Roger was later to say that the Pryors got their brains from the Blands. His father said, however, that he thought they had some brains even before they merged with the Blands.20 Wherever the brains came from and however much of them he had inherited, Roger planned to put them to optimum use. When he was only twelve years old he vowed, "I am going to make my mark at whatever I do; if it is blacksmithing, I will be a good blacksmith."21
But blacksmithing was not his ambition. He began his education at the Classical Academy of Ephraim Dodd Saunders, in Petersburg, near where he was born, an institution not noted for producing blacksmiths. Then in 1843, following the precise path pioneered twenty years before by the father he admired, he entered Hampden-Sydney College, became a member of the elite Union Society, and fell in love with books. He had early read Boswell's Johnson, later confessing to his own son that it had given him a taste for literature and the habit of reading. Those were his signature traits at Hampden-Sydney.22
Hampden-Sydney College was made to order for the love of reading, rural serenity, and studious repose that Roger had inherited from the Bland line. It was a little all-male academy housed in a building on a hill among the chinquapins, a tree-shrub of the chestnut family common throughout the South, particularly southside Virginia. A well-armed student at Hampden-Sydney was obliged to carry a pocketful of chinquapin nuts, not just for munching but as weaponry. The country about the little college was also a kingdom of pine barrens and scrub oak groves, rooted in red clay soil. The open field around the academy building was scarred by gullies, weed filled, and teeming with cows and hogs belonging to professors, who raised them to supplement their meager incomes. The cows, with bells clanging, working their cuds, grazed up to the windows of the academic building, creating a discord that often challenged study. It was a cow-pasture college. But in its time it had sent out into the workaday world many useful, even great, men.23
By the summer of 1845 Roger, almost seventeen years old, was nearly the man he had been growing up to be. He was a lanky six feet tall and "erect as a shaft," with the elastic step of an Indian, and he walked with "a restless, rapid gait." He had a striking and graceful presence, an ingratiating manner, and irresistibly charming speech. His hair, raven and glistening, hung long, loose, and straight to his shoulders, framing a classic face. There was a fire in his eyes, which were steel gray, but there was also in him a moderating strain of gentleness. He had a high forehead, a pronounced nose, and prominent cheeks. His face was innocent of hair and always would be. His features were mobile and expressive. His mouth was strong, large, and "strangely nervous." He was restless by nature and ruled by an "impetuous temperament," but he bore himself as if born to distinction, which indeed he was. He was ambitious, with a bulldog passion to master thoroughly whatever he undertook.
His salient characteristic was his voice, well-pitched and penetrating and capable of torrents of eloquence when deeply stirred. At such times the words came cartwheeling out so rapid-fire that they defied stenographic report, and his voice vibrated "like a trumpet." Few who heard or saw him, even at this early age, forgot him.24
There was a meeting of Presbyterian divines in Charlottesville in the summer of 1845, and Theodorick attended with Roger. To see Charlottesville was to understand why Thomas Jefferson chose to live there and only reluctantly ever left. Its setting blended mountains, fields, woodlands, and running streams into "a landscape of quiet, but uncommon beauty." To the west of the little village soared the Blue Ridge Mountains, one of the boldest and most beautiful horizons in the world. Theodorick and Roger approached Charlottesville from the east over a level landscape where, one writer has written, "nature seems to sleep in eternal repose." Another wrote that "there was almost a sense of pain at the stillness which seemed to reign." It was a place, yet another writer said, "where earth herself seemed struggling heavenward."25
Cradled in this scenic grandeur, Charlottesville was a village of "simple belfries" piercing the mists of surrounding green, and dominated by the classic pantheon and tall colonnades of the University of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson's legacy to his beloved state. There were four churches in the village, two bookstores, several dry-goods establishments, and a female seminary.26
There was also in Charlottesville at that time hospitality to spare. It was, in fact, an age in Virginia when visiting and being visited had been elevated to an art form, and when hospitality was considered "the chief of virtues."27 It was said that all Virginia houses were "built of elastic material capable of sheltering any number of guests, many of whom remained all summer." Indeed, that was rather expected when a visit was promised.28
It was said also that "the Virginia gentleman of those days was hospitable, as men are truthful, for his own sake first. His hospitality was spontaneous, unconscious, and free as heaven itself with its favors. All it asked in return was that you should come when you pleased, go when you pleased, stay as long as you pleased, and enjoy yourself to the top of your bent."29
Whenever large conventions of clergymen came to Charlottesville-and they came often-the visiting divines were taken into the town's elastic and hospitable homes. No man's house in the village was more elastic or more valued for its hospitality than the warm and welcoming home of Dr. Samuel Pleasants Hargrave, a physician. Any large religious or literary meeting coming to town caused the doctor to send the chairman a note asking how many guests he might be permitted to host. He had done this in advance of that summer's meeting of Presbyterian clergymen, and he had drawn Theodorick Pryor. So the Pryors, father and son, made their way out to the Hargrave house, which sat on one of the terraced hills overlooking the Blue Ridge.
After they entered the house, Roger, ever exuberant, bounded up toward his assigned room two stair steps at a time, and for the first time, saw Sara Agnes Rice. She was fifteen years old. She was brown eyed, with auburn hair plaited into long braids-and she was beautiful.

Copyright © 2002 by John C. Waugh

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Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2002-09-09:
Roger Pryor was an influential Virginia newspaper editor and politician before the war and a Democratic congressman in Washington until he resigned as the Southern states began to secede. His "fair lady," as he first addressed her, was the former Sara Agnes Rice, whose family had been in Virginia since 1680. Waugh (The Class of 1846) bases this engaging account of their lives and times in part on Roger's correspondence and on two memoirs that Sara wrote after the war. Commanding the Third Virginia regiment during the Civil War, Roger competently led through the Seven Days, Second Manassas and Antietam, where he was elevated to division command and failed terribly. He was relegated to a secondary command and eventually resigned in disgust, reenlisting as a private in a Virginia cavalry regiment. Captured at Petersburg in 1864, he was imprisoned in a New York fort until released in early 1865. While he was away from home, Sara coped with six children, scraping by for food, clothing and shelter during her long stay in the Petersburg area, but keeping the family intact. In late 1865, Roger went to New York City, invited by friends he had known before the war. He became a lawyer, struggled for several years, then made enough money to bring his family to the city, forging a successful legal career (and making speeches noting that he was glad the South lost and the nation was now reunited) before retiring in 1899. Waugh describes vividly the society in which the Pryors moved and their struggles during the war, but the reconstructed dialogue and breathless descriptions ("Sara's heart pounded as she read the telegram from Roger in Norfolk in May," begins one chapter) may deter the more historically minded. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-10-01:
Award-winning author Waugh (The Class of 1846; Reelecting Lincoln) takes us deep into the heart of Dixie in this life-and-times dual biography of the Pryors Virginia secessionists, ardent Confederates, and postwar Unionists. Roger Pryor made his name first as a fire-eating editor, then as a soldier, and finally as a lawyer, each of which positions allowed the Pryors to move in the highest social circles in antebellum Washington, DC, wartime Richmond, and postwar New York City. Waugh describes in great detail the travails of a family separated by war, the petticoat politics of the Confederate capital, the privations and despair of retreat and defeat, and the difficulties of leaving the South and finding a new life in the North. Waugh's accounts of battles and leaders do not redraw what we already know of the Virginia campaigns, but his vivid portrayals of private lives at war match anything in print. Waugh overdramatizes by including dialog and imputing motives to actions that the sources do not wholly sustain, and he sees the world uncritically from the Pryors' eyes. But in the Pryors he has found the couple he was seeking to retell the war. Not since Robert Manson Myers's Pulitzer Prize-winning Children of Pride has a white Southern family come so fully and fiercely to life. Recommended for public and college libraries. Randall M. Miller, Saint Joseph's Univ., Philadelphia (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
ADVANCE PRAISE FOR SURVIVING THE CONFEDERACY "Magnificent--a greater work of history than Gone With the Wind is a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War."--Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University
ADVANCE PRAISE FOR SURVIVING THE CONFEDERACY"Magnificent--a greater work of history than Gone With the Wind is a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War."--Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, September 2002
Library Journal, October 2002
Washington Post, November 2002
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Advance praise forSurviving the Confederacy "Magnificent -- a greater work of history thanGone With the Windis a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War." --Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University And for John C. Waugh's previous books: REELECTING LINCOLN: "Waugh...recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drana and one vivid scene after another." --The New York Times Book Review "It is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." --Jonathan Yardley ,Washington Post "An inherently dramatic story... [Waugh] brings to his task the keen eye for detail and scene-setting." --The Wall Street Journal "Waugh draws out a memorable cast of characters... Waugh's book is a colorfully wrought reminder of how difficult and important the political battles of 1864 were." --The New York Times The Class of 1846 A "compelling narrative that follows the fate of [the West Point class of 1846] from plebe days to Appomattox and beyond." --David Murray,The New York Times "John C. Waugh must be given highpoints for originality. His penetrating analysis of that achievement [of a fair, just peace] brings his fine book to an appropriate conclusion." --Jonathan Yardley,Washington Post A "first-rate and moving account.... Waugh has vividly reconstructed a stirring and often tragic story." --Guy Halverson, The Christian Science Monitor
Back Cover Copy
Advance praise for Surviving the Confederacy "Magnificent -- a greater work of history than Gone With the Wind is a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War." --Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University And for John C. Waugh's previous books: REELECTING LINCOLN : "Waugh...recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drana and one vivid scene after another." -- The New York Times Book Review "It is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." --Jonathan Yardley , Washington Post "An inherently dramatic story... [Waugh] brings to his task the keen eye for detail and scene-setting." -- The Wall Street Journal "Waugh draws out a memorable cast of characters... Waugh's book is a colorfully wrought reminder of how difficult and important the political battles of 1864 were." -- The New York Times The Class of 1846 A "compelling narrative that follows the fate of [the West Point class of 1846] from plebe days to Appomattox and beyond." --David Murray, The New York Times "John C. Waugh must be given highpoints for originality. His penetrating analysis of that achievement [of a fair, just peace] brings his fine book to an appropriate conclusion." --Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post A "first-rate and moving account.... Waugh has vividly reconstructed a stirring and often tragic story." --Guy Halverson , The Christian Science Monitor
Back Cover Copy
Advance praise for Surviving the Confederacy"Magnificent -- a greater work of history than Gone With the Wind is a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War." --Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University And for John C. Waugh's previous books:REELECTING LINCOLN:"Waugh...recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drana and one vivid scene after another." --The New York Times Book Review"It is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." --Jonathan Yardley , Washington Post"An inherently dramatic story... [Waugh] brings to his task the keen eye for detail and scene-setting." --The Wall Street Journal"Waugh draws out a memorable cast of characters... Waugh's book is a colorfully wrought reminder of how difficult and important the political battles of 1864 were." --The New York TimesThe Class of 1846A "compelling narrative that follows the fate of [the West Point class of 1846] from plebe days to Appomattox and beyond." --David Murray, The New York Times"John C. Waugh must be given highpoints for originality. His penetrating analysis of that achievement [of a fair, just peace] brings his fine book to an appropriate conclusion." --Jonathan Yardley, Washington PostA "first-rate and moving account.... Waugh has vividly reconstructed a stirring and often tragic story." --Guy Halverson, The Christian Science Monitor
Main Description
War is hell--and not only on the battlefield, as John Waugh eloquently demonstrates in this fascinating and poignant portrait of one of the South's most well-known and admired couples, Roger and Sara Pryor, their friends, and their society. Pryor was an ardent and fiery newspaper editor, secessionist leader, and soldier; she a graceful and compassionate companion, mother, and survivor. They were present at many of the crucial moments before and during the Civil War, from the first shot at Sumter to the fall of Richmond. Living examples of the South's pride and success before the war, they were also victims of the ensuing privation and destruction. If the Pryors are the principal actors in the drama of Surviving the Confederacy, the people they knew and the people who suffered along with them form a resonant chorus that describes the life of the South during the war and the devastation that followed it. Surviving the Confederacy dramatizes that transformation with a story that is uniquely compelling and alive.
Main Description
War is hell--and not only on the battlefield, as John Waugh eloquently demonstrates in this fascinating and poignant portrait of one of the South's most well-known and admired couples, Roger and Sara Pryor, their friends, and their society. Pryor was an ardent and fiery newspaper editor, secessionist leader, and soldier; she a graceful and compassionate companion, mother, and survivor. They were present at many of the crucial moments before and during the Civil War, from the first shot at Sumter to the fall of Richmond. Living examples of the South's pride and success before the war, they were also victims of the ensuing privation and destruction. If the Pryors are the principal actors in the drama of Surviving the Confederacy , the people they knew and the people who suffered along with them form a resonant chorus that describes the life of the South during the war and the devastation that followed it. Surviving the Confederacy dramatizes that transformation with a story that is uniquely compelling and alive.
Unpaid Annotation
Advance praise for "Surviving the Confederacy "Magnificent -- a greater work of history than "Gone With the Wind is a novel. By far the fullest account I have ever read of a man and his wife and their family during the Civil War." --Grady McWhiney, Professor Emeritus of History, Texas Christian University" And for John C. Waugh's previous books: "REELECTING LINCOLN: "Waugh...recounts the 1864 election with great narrative skill. The story sweeps along, with brilliant vignettes of all the players in the drana and one vivid scene after another." --"The New York Times Book Review "It is, as Waugh well knows--and well tells it--a terrific story." --Jonathan Yardley, "Washington Post "An inherently dramatic story... [Waugh] brings to his task the keen eye for detail and scene-setting." --"The Wall Street Journal "Waugh draws out a memorable cast of characters... Waugh's book is a colorfully wrought reminder of how difficult and important the political battles of 1864 were."--"The New,York Times "The Class of 1846 A "compelling narrative that follows the fate of [the West Point class of 1846] from plebe days to Appomattox and beyond." --David Murray, "The New York Times "John C. Waugh must be given highpoints for originality. His penetrating analysis of that achievement [of a fair, just peace] brings his fine book to an appropriate conclusion." --Jonathan Yardley," Washington Post A "first-rate and moving account.... Waugh has vividly reconstructed a stirring and often tragic story." --Guy Halverson," The Christian Science Monitor
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Rogerp. 5
Sarap. 13
Harry Hotspur and the Washington Bellep. 21
The Fire-Eaterp. 47
Coming Untiedp. 69
Strike a Blow!p. 82
Cradle Days of the Confederacyp. 98
Sewing for the Rebellionp. 111
A Message from the Gunsp. 122
Seeing the Elephantp. 128
Somebody's Darlingp. 148
Marching with Leep. 161
Alone in the Blackwaterp. 171
A Bizarre Resignationp. 189
War at the Doorp. 200
In the Cannon's Mouthp. 221
The Riderless Horsep. 236
The Tightening Noosep. 242
The Northern Bastillep. 261
Death Knellp. 273
Shattered Livesp. 294
Into the Arms of the Enemyp. 306
Epilogue: The Sweetheart of My Lifep. 324
A Word of Thanksp. 341
Endnotesp. 345
Bibliographyp. 395
Indexp. 431
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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