Catalogue


The first Cold War : the legacy of Woodrow Wilson in U.S.-Soviet relations /
Donald E. Davis & Eugene P. Trani.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2002.
description
xxiii, 329 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
ISBN
082621388X (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2002.
isbn
082621388X (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4718794
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 291-312) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Donald E. Davis is Professor of History at Illinois State University in Normal.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-03-01:
Davis (Illinois State Univ., Normal) and Trani (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.) have produced a first-rate study of Woodrow Wilson's Russian policy. The authors begin with Wilson's accession to the presidency in March 1913 and take the narrative through the December 1919 decision to withdraw US troops from Siberia. Among topics covered are initial US unpreparedness in dealing with Russia, efforts to keep the embryonic government of Alexander Kerensky in WW I, various clandestine and open policies to confront the Bolshevik revolution, US intervention in northern Russia and Siberia, and the role played by the US in the Russian civil war. Offering a conclusion that might be overdrawn, the authors find the foundation of the Cold War in the policies of President Wilson and Secretaries of State Robert Lansing and Bainbridge Colby. The book offers perceptive portraits of such figures as Raymond Robins and General William V. Judson. The documentation is unusually thorough, as it includes US, British, and Russian manuscript collections, printed published documents, and scholarly articles, books, and dissertations. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All undergraduate and graduate libraries. J. D. Doenecke New College of Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
" The First Cold Warbrings new ideas and a fresh viewpoint to one of the most significant subjects in twentieth-century international relations. . . . It persuasively advances the thesis that the policy position Wilson arrived at through trial and error, one of patient quarantine,' was the precursor and model for George Kennan's containment,' which formed the basis for America's long and ultimately successful prosecution of the Cold War. This is an important book with a fascinating, pertinent message."-John Milton Cooper, Jr.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
In The First Cold War, Donald E. Davis and Eugene P. Trani review the Wilson administration's attitudes toward Russia before, during, and after the Bolshevik seizure of power. They argue that before the Russian Revolution, Woodrow Wilson had little understanding of Russia and made poor appointments that cost the United States Russian goodwill. Wilson later reversed those negative impressions by being the first to recognize Russia's Provisional Government, resulting in positive U.S.Russian relations until Lenin gained power in 1917. Wilson at first seemed unsure whether to recognize or repudiate Lenin and the Bolsheviks. His vacillation finally ended in a firm repudiation when he opted for a diplomatic quarantine having almost all of the ingredients of the later Cold War. Davis and Trani argue that Wilson deserves mild criticism for his early indecision and inability to form a coherent policy toward what would become the Soviet Union. But they believe Wilson rightly came to the conclusion that until the regime became more moderate, it was useless for America to engage it diplomatically. The authors see in Wilson's approach the foundations for the "first Cold War"-meaning not simply a refusal to recognize the Soviet Union, but a strong belief that its influence was harmful and would spread if not contained or quarantined. Wilson's Soviet policy in essence lasted until Roosevelt extended diplomatic recognition in the 1930s. But The First Cold Warsuggests that Wilson's impact extended beyond Roosevelt to Truman, showing that the policies of Wilson and Truman closely resemble each other with the exception of an arms race. Wilson's intellectual reputation lent credibility to U.S. Cold War policy from Truman to Reagan, and the reader can draw a direct connection from Wilson to the collapse of the USSR. Wilsonians were the first Cold War warriors, and in the era of President Woodrow Wilson, the first Cold War began.
Main Description
InThe First Cold War, Donald E. Davis and Eugene P. Trani review the Wilson administration's attitudes toward Russia before, during, and after the Bolshevik seizure of power. They argue that before the Russian Revolution, Woodrow Wilson had little understanding of Russia and made poor appointments that cost the United States Russian goodwill. Wilson later reversed those negative impressions by being the first to recognize Russia's Provisional Government, resulting in positive U.S.Russian relations until Lenin gained power in 1917. Wilson at first seemed unsure whether to recognize or repudiate Lenin and the Bolsheviks. His vacillation finally ended in a firm repudiation when he opted for a diplomatic quarantine having almost all of the ingredients of the later Cold War. Davis and Trani argue that Wilson deserves mild criticism for his early indecision and inability to form a coherent policy toward what would become the Soviet Union. But they believe Wilson rightly came to the conclusion that until the regime became more moderate, it was useless for America to engage it diplomatically. The authors see in Wilson's approach the foundations for the "first Cold War"-meaning not simply a refusal to recognize the Soviet Union, but a strong belief that its influence was harmful and would spread if not contained or quarantined. Wilson's Soviet policy in essence lasted until Roosevelt extended diplomatic recognition in the 1930s. ButThe First Cold Warsuggests that Wilson's impact extended beyond Roosevelt to Truman, showing that the policies of Wilson and Truman closely resemble each other with the exception of an arms race. Wilson's intellectual reputation lent credibility to U.S. Cold War policy from Truman to Reagan, and the reader can draw a direct connection from Wilson to the collapse of the USSR. Wilsonians were the first Cold War warriors, and in the era of President Woodrow Wilson, the first Cold War began.
Main Description
In The First Cold War, Donald E. Davis and Eugene P. Trani review the Wilson administration’s attitudes toward Russia before, during, and after the Bolshevik seizure of power. They argue that before the Russian Revolution, Woodrow Wilson had little understanding of Russia and made poor appointments that cost the United States Russian goodwill. Wilson later reversed those negative impressions by being the first to recognize Russia’s Provisional Government, resulting in positive U.S.–Russian relations until Lenin gained power in 1917. Wilson at first seemed unsure whether to recognize or repudiate Lenin and the Bolsheviks. His vacillation finally ended in a firm repudiation when he opted for a diplomatic quarantine having almost all of the ingredients of the later Cold War. Davis and Trani argue that Wilson deserves mild criticism for his early indecision and inability to form a coherent policy toward what would become the Soviet Union. But they believe Wilson rightly came to the conclusion that until the regime became more moderate, it was useless for America to engage it diplomatically. The authors see in Wilson’s approach the foundations for the “first Cold War”-meaning not simply a refusal to recognize the Soviet Union, but a strong belief that its influence was harmful and would spread if not contained or quarantined. Wilson’s Soviet policy in essence lasted until Roosevelt extended diplomatic recognition in the 1930s. But The First Cold Warsuggests that Wilson’s impact extended beyond Roosevelt to Truman, showing that the policies of Wilson and Truman closely resemble each other with the exception of an arms race. Wilson’s intellectual reputation lent credibility to U.S. Cold War policy from Truman to Reagan, and the reader can draw a direct connection from Wilson to the collapse of the USSR. Wilsonians were the first Cold War warriors, and in the era of President Woodrow Wilson, the first Cold War began.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The authors review the Wilson administration's attitudes toward Russia before, during,and after the Bolshevik seizure of power. They argue that before the Russian Revolution, Woodrow Wilson had little understanding of Russia.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Foreword to the Russian Editionp. xi
Prefacep. xxi
Introduction: 1913: Russo-American Relationsp. 1
1914-1916: Three Ambassadors for St. Petersburgp. 15
1917: The Root Mission and Stevens Railway Commissionp. 35
Wilson and Lansing Face Lenin and Trotskyp. 58
December 1917: The Struggle for a Policyp. 74
January 1918: Point VI of XIVp. 100
Northern Russia and Siberiap. 128
1919: Paris in the Springp. 158
The First Cold Warriorsp. 175
Conclusions: 1921: The First Cold Warp. 200
An Essay on Notes and Sourcesp. 207
Notesp. 233
Bibliographyp. 291
Indexp. 313
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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