Catalogue


The narrow path of freedom and other essays /
Eugene Davidson.
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2002.
description
160 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826214045 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2002.
isbn
0826214045 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4718743
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Eugene Davidson is the author of numerous books President Emeritus of the Conference on European Problems and former President of the Foundation for Foreign Affairs, Davidson lived in Santa Barbara, California, until his recent death at the age of ninety-nine
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The pieces in The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays, by the well-known historian Eugene Davidson, are nothing less than a triumph -- historical, of course, but also literary and philosophical. Dealing with the history of the past half-century, they face the world's encouraging as well as saddening developments. Davidson has a way with words; as befits such a far-ranging author, every essay is exquisitely written. One group of the essays confronts the idea of history -- what the past should mean. From the Nuremburg Trials to Saddam Hussein, the absurdities of Ezra Pound to the idealism of Charles A. Beard, whom Davidson knew well -- here is a book that will last well into our already turbulent new century.
Main Description
Eugene Davidson's final book,The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays,examines historical instances of man's inhumanity to man, providing poignant insight that we can profit from as we contemplate an ongoing battle against terrorism. A superb essayist, Davidson here displays an extraordinary range. Long a student of international relations, he writes of the Nuremberg trials after World War II and, as the book's title indicates, of the narrow path of freedom that the democracies have had to travel during the last half century. The path allowed little stumbling, lest they would fall into the errors that disgraced the dictatorships. Davidson wears his wisdom lightly, delighting a reader with touches of humor and with wry, startlingly appropriate comparisons. A second set of essays examines the idea of history as it has survived into our present time, including what Davidson describes as the "thin coat of higher learning" in a commencement address in which he advises young men and women to listen to dissent and make up their own minds. As Davidson says, "The war of ideas is far from over, and every coming generation will have to bear its own share of the burden in the endless struggle for the survival of freedom." Last is a group of reminiscent essays. One recounts a friendship with the historian Charles A. Beard, who proposed to the young Davidson that he call him Uncle Charlie. In another Davidson plumbs the personality of a major figure of the Nazi era, Albert Speer. He also discusses the pathetic and perhaps demented Ezra Pound, whose genius as a poet may have been questionable but whose ability to survive was remarkable. The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essaysis a valuable guide for all who try to keep the idea of freedom alive. The pieces in it are nothing less than a triumph-historical, literary, philosophical. By confronting the idea of history-what the past should mean-Davidson gives us a book that will last well into our already turbulent new century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
These essays deal with the history of the past half-century, facing the world's encouraging as well as saddening developments, from the Nuremburg Trials to Saddam Hussein and the absurdities of Ezra Pound.
Main Description
Eugene Davidson’s final book, The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays,examines historical instances of man’s inhumanity to man, providing poignant insight that we can profit from as we contemplate an ongoing battle against terrorism. A superb essayist, Davidson here displays an extraordinary range. Long a student of international relations, he writes of the Nuremberg trials after World War II and, as the book’s title indicates, of the narrow path of freedom that the democracies have had to travel during the last half century. The path allowed little stumbling, lest they would fall into the errors that disgraced the dictatorships. Davidson wears his wisdom lightly, delighting a reader with touches of humor and with wry, startlingly appropriate comparisons. A second set of essays examines the idea of history as it has survived into our present time, including what Davidson describes as the “thin coat of higher learning” in a commencement address in which he advises young men and women to listen to dissent and make up their own minds. As Davidson says, “The war of ideas is far from over, and every coming generation will have to bear its own share of the burden in the endless struggle for the survival of freedom.” Last is a group of reminiscent essays. One recounts a friendship with the historian Charles A. Beard, who proposed to the young Davidson that he call him Uncle Charlie. In another Davidson plumbs the personality of a major figure of the Nazi era, Albert Speer. He also discusses the pathetic and perhaps demented Ezra Pound, whose genius as a poet may have been questionable but whose ability to survive was remarkable. The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essaysis a valuable guide for all who try to keep the idea of freedom alive. The pieces in it are nothing less than a triumph-historical, literary, philosophical. By confronting the idea of history-what the past should mean-Davidson gives us a book that will last well into our already turbulent new century.
Main Description
Eugene Davidson's final book, The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essays,examines historical instances of man's inhumanity to man, providing poignant insight that we can profit from as we contemplate an ongoing battle against terrorism. A superb essayist, Davidson here displays an extraordinary range. Long a student of international relations, he writes of the Nuremberg trials after World War II and, as the book's title indicates, of the narrow path of freedom that the democracies have had to travel during the last half century. The path allowed little stumbling, lest they would fall into the errors that disgraced the dictatorships. Davidson wears his wisdom lightly, delighting a reader with touches of humor and with wry, startlingly appropriate comparisons. A second set of essays examines the idea of history as it has survived into our present time, including what Davidson describes as the "thin coat of higher learning" in a commencement address in which he advises young men and women to listen to dissent and make up their own minds. As Davidson says, "The war of ideas is far from over, and every coming generation will have to bear its own share of the burden in the endless struggle for the survival of freedom." Last is a group of reminiscent essays. One recounts a friendship with the historian Charles A. Beard, who proposed to the young Davidson that he call him Uncle Charlie. In another Davidson plumbs the personality of a major figure of the Nazi era, Albert Speer. He also discusses the pathetic and perhaps demented Ezra Pound, whose genius as a poet may have been questionable but whose ability to survive was remarkable. The Narrow Path of Freedom and Other Essaysis a valuable guide for all who try to keep the idea of freedom alive. The pieces in it are nothing less than a triumph-historical, literary, philosophical. By confronting the idea of history-what the past should mean-Davidson gives us a book that will last well into our already turbulent new century.
Table of Contents
Foreign Affairs
The Nuremberg Trials and One Worldp. 3
Nurembergp. 21
The United States and Europep. 28
Visiting Chinap. 47
The Narrow Path of Freedomp. 56
Global Aspects of East-West Relationsp. 62
The End of the Cold War?p. 69
Saddam and a New World Orderp. 73
The Idea of History
History As It Really Isp. 79
Domestic Peacep. 84
Looking Backwardp. 90
The Thin Coat of the Higher Learningp. 95
The Path of the Westp. 103
The Further Decline of the Westp. 110
Individuals
Remembrance of Uncle Charliep. 117
Albert Speerp. 134
Ezra Poundp. 138
The Suzette Morton Davidson Galleryp. 146
Indexp. 149
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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