Catalogue


A good start in life : understanding your child's brain and behavior /
Norbert Herschkowitz, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Dana Press/Joseph Henry Press, c2002.
description
xiv, 283 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0309076390
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : Dana Press/Joseph Henry Press, c2002.
isbn
0309076390
contents note
Introduction -- 1. Life in the womb -- 2. Birth -- 3. Getting started -- 4. Exploring -- 5. Comfort and communication maps and milestones -- 6. Discovering -- 7. Me and you -- 8. Gaining competence -- 9. Living together -- 10. Paths to personality -- 11. Ten guideposts for parents.
catalogue key
4716623
 
Also available via the internet.
Includes bibliographical references (p. 259-268) and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-12-01:
This clear, enjoyable book is intended primarily for parents and adults involved with young children, in an effort to help them understand the importance of the early years without scaring them into extremes of either helplessness or overdoing it. Well organized for initial understanding and for later reference use, the book comprises three sections organized by age and divided into chapters concerning topics important to those ages. The authors wisely chose to locate a special section designed to introduce vocabulary and drawings relevant to neuroanatomy not at the beginning, where it might intimidate lay readers, but in the middle where it invites repeated exploration. Later chapters refer back to earlier ones, a good pedagogical device, if a little repetitious. Readers will appreciate finding so much neurological information directly linked to child development in one easy read. Though clearly targeted to lay persons, the book could be a very useful starting point for those not familiar with developmental neuroscience. Beginning undergraduates, early childhood educators or other child-involved professionals, and laypersons. J. F. Heberle Albright College
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-08-12:
Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and Chapman Herschkowitz, his American educator wife, use a novel device to tackle an oft-discussed subject child development. Directing their text at the educated parents of newborns to six year olds, the authors devise fictitious children of differing temperaments, which allows readers to connect with the text. As these children relate to their parents and one another, their activities at developmental milestones are described. A question-and-answer section closes each chapter. Concerns about what the parent should do in various situations are briefly answered by referring to a scientific explanation, though in several sections the discussion of a topic seems to end abruptly. Although slightly dated, Lise Eliot's What's Going on in There?, Kyle Pruett's Me, Myself, and I: How Children Build Their Sense of Self, and Craig T. and Sharon L. Ramey's Right from Birth are more complete. Still, with a glossary of technical terms and a fairly current bibliography, this remains a solid entry in a crowded field. Purchase for large public library collections. Margaret Cardwell, Christian Brothers Univ. Lib., Memphis (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist,
Library Journal, August 2002
Choice, December 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Blending scientific authority with a personal approach, this book focuses on a child's intellectual, emotional and social development. It will be of great use to parents in the real world, answering questions with clear, practical information.
Description for Bookstore
There are lots of child development books on the market. But how do readers – especially parents – find practical answers they can trust? A Good Start in Life provides just that. We all want to do the best we can for our children. Nature has equipped us with an instinct to protect and nurture. Unfortunately, we have not been provided with universal rules of parenting. So we look to experts to fill that void. But there’s just so much information out there – and it often looks like half of it appears to be filled with contradictory advice while the other half is mired in scientific jargon that most parents have trouble deciphering. This is especially true of the data on the intricate workings of the developing brain. It’s a daunting task to figure out just what a parent should do. The key is to listen carefully to what science is telling us. Finally, we have sensible guides to interpret the information in straightforward and practical ways. Dr. Norbert Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and his wife, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz, an American educator, have teamed up to write this warm, friendly book to guide parents through the formative years of their child’s life. With a specific focus on the brain, we follow the path of early childhood development from gestation to birth to six years old. Each chapter deals with a particular phase of development. We begin with “Life in the Womb – What Are You Doing In There?” and “Newborn – Here I am!” As parents add candles to the birthday cake, new chapters prepare them for what lies ahead. Best of all, each chapter is accompanied by a section called, “To Think About” These sections address practical topics like good night rituals, testing limits, coping with conflict, reading books together, the value of piano lessons, evaluating day care options, and encouraging “why” questions. Although there are scores of books that deal with early childhood development, few – if any – so artfully combine solid, reliable science with logical, clear-cut information and advice. Parents need no longer worry about missing special “windows” of learning opportunity. They don’t have to deal with lingering doubts about the “right” way or the “best” way to bring up their child. They won’t be left with that niggling feeling that they just didn’t do something essential. With science – and the Herschkowitz’s – by their side, the process of bringing up baby just got a whole lot easier.
Description for Bookstore
There are lots of child development books on the market. But how do readers especially parents find practical answers they can trust? A Good Start in Life provides just that. We all want to do the best we can for our children. Nature has equipped us with an instinct to protect and nurture. Unfortunately, we have not been provided with universal rules of parenting. So we look to experts to fill that void. But there's just so much information out there and it often looks like half of it appears to be filled with contradictory advice while the other half is mired in scientific jargon that most parents have trouble deciphering. This is especially true of the data on the intricate workings of the developing brain. It's a daunting task to figure out just what a parent should do. The key is to listen carefully to what science is telling us. Finally, we have sensible guides to interpret the information in straightforward and practical ways. Dr. Norbert Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and his wife, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz, an American educator, have teamed up to write this warm, friendly book to guide parents through the formative years of their child's life. With a specific focus on the brain, we follow the path of early childhood development from gestation to birth to six years old. Each chapter deals with a particular phase of development. We begin with "Life in the Womb What Are You Doing In There?" and "Newborn Here I am!" As parents add candles to the birthday cake, new chapters prepare them for what lies ahead. Best of all, each chapter is accompanied by a section called, "To Think About…" These sections address practical topics like good night rituals, testing limits, coping with conflict, reading books together, the value of piano lessons, evaluating day care options, and encouraging "why" questions. Although there are scores of books that deal with early childhood development, few if any so artfully combine solid, reliable science with logical, clear-cut information and advice. Parents need no longer worry about missing special "windows" of learning opportunity. They don't have to deal with lingering doubts about the "right" way or the "best" way to bring up their child. They won't be left with that niggling feeling that they just didn't do something essential. With science and the Herschkowitz's by their side, the process of bringing up baby just got a whole lot easier.
Description for Bookstore
There are lots of child development books on the market. But how do readers especially parents find practical answers they can trust? A Good Start in Lifeprovides just that. We all want to do the best we can for our children. Nature has equipped us with an instinct to protect and nurture. Unfortunately, we have not been provided with universal rules of parenting. So we look to experts to fill that void. But there's just so much information out there and it often looks like half of it appears to be filled with contradictory advice while the other half is mired in scientific jargon that most parents have trouble deciphering. This is especially true of the data on the intricate workings of the developing brain. It's a daunting task to figure out just what a parent should do. The key is to listen carefully to what science is telling us. Finally, we have sensible guides to interpret the information in straightforward and practical ways. Dr. Norbert Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and his wife, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz, an American educator, have teamed up to write this warm, friendly book to guide parents through the formative years of their child's life. With a specific focus on the brain, we follow the path of early childhood development from gestation to birth to six years old. Each chapter deals with a particular phase of development. We begin with "Life in the Womb What Are You Doing In There?" and "Newborn Here I am!" As parents add candles to the birthday cake, new chapters prepare them for what lies ahead. Best of all, each chapter is accompanied by a section called, "To Think About…" These sections address practical topics like good night rituals, testing limits, coping with conflict, reading books together, the value of piano lessons, evaluating day care options, and encouraging "why" questions. Although there are scores of books that deal with early childhood development, few if any so artfully combine solid, reliable science with logical, clear-cut information and advice. Parents need no longer worry about missing special "windows" of learning opportunity. They don't have to deal with lingering doubts about the "right" way or the "best" way to bring up their child. They won't be left with that niggling feeling that they just didn't do something essential. With science and the Herschkowitz's by their side, the process of bringing up baby just got a whole lot easier.
Long Description
There are lots of child development books on the market. But how do readers - especially parents - find practical answers they can trust? A Good Start in Life provides just that. We all want to do the best we can for our children. Nature has equipped us with an instinct to protect and nurture. Unfortunately, we have not been provided with universal rules of parenting. So we look to experts to fill that void. But there's just so much information out there - and it often looks like half of it appears to be filled with contradictory advice while the other half is mired in scientific jargon that most parents have trouble deciphering. This is especially true of the data on the intricate workings of the developing brain. It's a daunting task to figure out just what a parent should do. The key is to listen carefully to what science is telling us. Finally, we have sensible guides to interpret the information in straightforward and practical ways. Dr. Norbert Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and his wife, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz, an American educator, have teamed up to write this warm, friendly book to guide parents through the formative years of their child's life. With a specific focus on the brain, we follow the path of early childhood development from gestation to birth to six years old. Each chapter deals with a particular phase of development. We begin with "Life in the Womb - What Are You Doing In There?" and "Newborn - Here I am!" As parents add candles to the birthday cake, new chapters prepare them for what lies ahead. Best of all, each chapter is accompanied by a section called, "To Think About..." These sections address practical topics like good night rituals, testing limits, coping with conflict, reading books together, the value of piano lessons, evaluating day care options, and encouraging "why" questions. Although there are scores of books that deal with early childhood development, few - if any - so artfully combine solid, reliable science with logical, clear-cut information and advice. Parents need no longer worry about missing special "windows" of learning opportunity. They don't have to deal with lingering doubts about the "right" way or the "best" way to bring up their child. They won't be left with that niggling feeling that they just didn't do something essential. With science - and the Herschkowitz's - by their side, the process of bringing up baby just got a whole lot easier.
Main Description
We all want to do the best we can for our children. Nature has equipped us with an instinct to protect and nurture. Unfortunately, we have not been provided with universal rules of parenting, and so we look to experts to fill that void. But there's so much information out there -- and half of it appears to be filled with contradictory advice while the other half is mired in scientific jargon that most parents have trouble deciphering. This is especially true of the data on the intricate workings of the developing brain. It's a daunting task to figure out just what a parent should do. The key is to listen carefully to what science is telling us. Finally, we have a sensible guide to interpret the information in straightforward and practical ways.Dr. Norbert Herschkowitz, a Swiss pediatrician and neuroscientist, and his wife, Elinore Chapman Herschkowitz, an American educator, have teamed up to write this warm, friendly book to guide parents through the formative years of their child's life. Witha specific,focus on the brain, they follow the path of early childhood development from gestation to age six years. Each chapter deals with a particular phase of development.They begin with "Life in the Womb -- What Are You Doing in There?" and "Newborn -- Here I Am!" As parents add candles to the birthday cake, new chapters prepare them for what lies ahead. Best of all, each chapter is accompanied by a section called, "To Think About. . . ." These sections address practical topics such as good-night rituals, testing limits, coping with conflict, reading books together, the value of piano lessons, evaluating day-care options, and encouraging "why" questions.Although there are scores ofbooks that deal with early childhood development, few -- if any -- so artfully combine solid, reliable science with logical, clear-cut information and advice. Parents need no longer worry about missing special "windows" of lear
Table of Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Introductionp. 1
Getting Ready
Life in the Wombp. 11
Birthp. 29
The First Year
One Candle for Emilyp. 49
Getting Startedp. 51
Exploringp. 67
Comfort and Communicationp. 95
Maps and Milestonesp. 111
The Second Year
Two Candles for Emilyp. 127
Discoveringp. 129
Me and Youp. 149
Three to Six Years
Six Candles for Emilyp. 167
Gaining Competencep. 169
Living Togetherp. 198
Paths to Personalityp. 217
Ten Guideposts for Parentsp. 241
Glossaryp. 255
Referencesp. 259
Indexp. 269
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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