Catalogue


Literature, politics, and national identity : Reformation to Renaissance /
Andrew Hadfield.
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
description
xvii, 265 p. : illus.
ISBN
0521442079 (hc)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1994.
isbn
0521442079 (hc)
catalogue key
470861
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1995-05:
Arguing that literary history has undervalued the bulk of 16th-century writing, Hadfield's reinterpretation focuses on specific authors: John Skelton; John Bale; the various authors of A Mirror for Magistrates; the rhetoricians and literary theorists Thomas Wilson, Stephen Gosson, and George Puttenham; Sir Philip Sidney; and Edmund Spenser. He sees them all as concerned to establish a native, vernacular literary tradition that would help to define a national identity, and shows that all were eager to see in literature a public space for political debate. This is not to suggest that these men were in agreement with each other; at the heart of Hadfield's argument is the thesis that the century was one in which ideas about what constitutes literature, its ends, and the nation were constantly being redefined. Hadfield's approach explicitly raises larger questions about literary study, for it suggests that the dismissal of the 16th century as a "drab-age" primarily reflects the teleological biases of national and literary histories, which tend to discount whatever fails to lead to what now exists. Upper-division undergraduate and above. Recommended. B. E. Brandt; South Dakota State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 1995
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Library
For many years C. S. Lewis's dismissal of the sixteenth century as a 'drab age' has influenced literary scholars. Andrew Hadfield offers a challenging reinterpretation through the work of writers including Skelton, Bale, Sidney, Spenser, Baldwin and the Earl of Surrey, the establishment of a vernacular literary tradition as a crucial component of English identity, and the development of 'literature' as a site of critical and political debate. This is a study of literary texts, but also of politics, national identity and culture.
Main Description
For many years C. S. Lewis's dismissal of the sixteenth century as a 'drab age' has influenced literary scholars. Andrew Hadfield offers a challenging reinterpretation, through study of the work of some of the century's most important writers, including Skelton, Bale, Sidney, Spenser, Baldwin and the Earl of Surrey. He argues that all were involved in the establishment of a vernacular literary tradition as a crucial component of English identity, yet also wished to use the category of 'literature' to create a public space for critical political debate. Conventional assumptions - that pre-modern and modern history are neatly separated by the Renaissance, and that literary history is best studied as an autonomous narrative - are called into question: this book is a study of literary texts, but also a contribution to theories and histories of politics, national identity and culture.
Main Description
For many years C. S. Lewis's dismissal of the sixteenth century as a 'drab age' influenced literary scholars. Andrew Hadfield offers a challenging reinterpretation, through study of the work of some of the century's most important writers, including Skelton, Bale, Sidney, Spenser, Baldwin and the Earl of Surrey. He argues that all were involved in the establishment of a vernacular literary tradition as a crucial component of English identity, yet also wished to use the category of 'literature' to create a public space for critical political debate. Conventional assumptions - that pre-modern and modern history are neatly separated by the Renaissance, and that literary history is best studied as an autonomous narrative - are called into question: this book is a study of literary texts, but also a contribution to theories and histories of politics, national identity and culture.
Description for Bookstore
Andrew Hadfield offers a challenging reinterpretation of the sixteenth century through the work of major writers of the time, their involvement in the establishment of a vernacular literary tradition as a crucial component of English identity, and the development of 'literature' as a site of critical and political debate.
Main Description
For many years C. S. Lewis’s dismissal of the sixteenth century as a ‘drab age’ has influenced literary scholars. Andrew Hadfield offers a challenging reinterpretation, through study of the work of some of the century’s most important writers, including Skelton, Bale, Sidney, Spenser, Baldwin and the Earl of Surrey. He argues that all were involved in the establishment of a vernacular literary tradition as a crucial component of English identity, yet also wished to use the category of ‘literature’ to create a public space for critical political debate. Conventional assumptions - that pre-modern and modern history are neatly separated by the Renaissance, and that literary history is best studied as an autonomous narrative - are called into question: this book is a study of literary texts, but also a contribution to theories and histories of politics, national identity and culture.
Table of Contents
Introduction: the nation and public literature in the sixteenth century
A Skelton in the closet: English literary identity betwixt and between
John Bale and the time of the nation
Literature and history - a mirror for magistrates
Towards a national form: rhetoric and literary theory from Wilson to Puttenham
Whose bloody country is it anyway? Sir Philip Sidney, the nation and the public
'Who knowes not Colin Clout?': the permanent exile of Edmund Spenser
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem