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Charles Clarke, pen and ink warrior /
Kenneth C. Dewar.
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2002.
description
xvii, 330 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0773523545 (bound)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Montreal : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2002.
isbn
0773523545 (bound)
catalogue key
4708147
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kenneth C. Dewar is associate professor and chair of the Department of History, Mount Saint Vincent University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-02-01:
Dewar tells the life of a village newspaperman in 19th-century Ontario, a young man of literary bent out of Lincolnshire, England, who came to Canada in 1844 at the age of 17. Charles Clarke (1826-1909) first saw Elora, at the falls of the Grand River, in 1848; it was 80 miles west of Toronto, and he decided he liked it so well he would stay there. After all, if a newspaper were well written and vigorous, at times perhaps pugnacious, it could prosper even out of a village. The Elora Backwoodsman was published from 1852 to 1859. Clarke was a radical who in his early years criticized just about anything that smacked of privilege; he championed the secret ballot and a wide suffrage. With abundant energy and a flair for polemics, Clarke was soon in Ontario politics, ending his career as clerk of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, 1892-1907. With this fine book, handsomely illustrated and produced, there is a revocation of obscurity and an intriguing vista of village Ontario and the impact of 19th-century changes on its people. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. B. Waite emeritus, Dalhousie University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Dewar's scholarship is exemplary. This is a superbly researched study with a nicely inflected mode of analysis of the various stages of Clarke's career and writings. An excellent example of the sort of cultural and intellectual history that can and should be written for early Canada." Heather Murray, Department of English, University of Toronto"A considerable accomplishment, and exceptionally well-written. Dewar reconstructs a past life deftly and provides convincing answers to the questions he asks of the material." Ramsay Cook, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, University of Toronto
"Dewar's scholarship is exemplary. This is a superbly researched study with a nicely inflected mode of analysis of the various stages of Clarke's career and writings. An excellent example of the sort of cultural and intellectual history that can and should be written for early Canada." Heather Murray, Department of English, University of Toronto ----- "A considerable accomplishment, and exceptionally well-written. Dewar reconstructs a past life deftly and provides convincing answers to the questions he asks of the material." Ramsay Cook, Dictionary of Canadian Biography, University of Toronto
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2003
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Using Clarke's journalistic writings, his private diary, and a memoir he wrote later in life, Kenneth Dewar paints a vivid picture of Clarke's evolving sense of himself and his world in an age of profound transformation.
Main Description
When Charles Clarke settled in Elora, Ontario, in 1848 he joined the ranks of the province's radical reformers, becoming a vigorous critic of everything in Canada that smacked of the old regime - rank, privilege, and monopoly - and an enthusiastic supporter of everything promised by the new - equity, democracy, and individual opportunity. He played a prominent role in drafting the "Clear Grit" platform of 1851, supporting such ideas as a householder's suffrage, the secret ballot, and representation by population. He later espoused the two great causes of nineteenth-century Anglo-Canadian liberalism - provincial rights in Canada and Irish Home Rule in Britain. Equally involved in local affairs - from the Sons of Temperance to the Natural History Society - Clarke tirelessly promoted the natural beauties of Elora and tried to protect the environment of the Grand River gorge from the ravages of industry and human carelessness. Using Clarke's journalistic writings, his private diary, and a memoir he wrote later in life, Kenneth Dewar paints a vivid picture of Clarke's evolving sense of himself and his world in an age of profound transformation.
Main Description
When Charles Clarke settled in Elora, Ontario, in 1848 he joined the ranks of the province's radical reformers, becoming a vigorous critic of everything in Canada that smacked of the old regime - rank, privilege, and monopoly - and an enthusiastic supporter of everything promised by the new - equity, democracy, and individual opportunity. He played a prominent role in drafting the "Clear Grit" platform of 1851, supporting such ideas as a householder's suffrage, the secret ballot, and representation by population. He later espoused the two great causes of nineteenth-century Anglo-Canadian liberalism - provincial rights in Canada and Irish Home Rule in Britain.Equally involved in local affairs - from the Sons of Temperance to the Natural History Society - Clarke tirelessly promoted the natural beauties of Elora and tried to protect the environment of the Grand River gorge from the ravages of industry and human carelessness. Using Clarke's journalistic writings, his private diary, and a memoir he wrote later in life, Kenneth Dewar paints a vivid picture of Clarke's evolving sense of himself and his world in an age of profound transformation.
Table of Contents
Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xiii
The Falls of the Grand Riverp. 3
Polemicist
Hopeful Emigrationp. 25
Victorian Radicalp. 47
Apostle of Refinementp. 71
The Education of an Optimistp. 97
Diarist
The Great Cow Casep. 123
Identity and Memoryp. 144
"O, Lovely Elora"p. 169
Household Savantp. 202
Memoirist
Loyal Party Soldierp. 235
Looking Backwardp. 252
Epiloguep. 270
Abbreviationsp. 275
Notesp. 277
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Rittenhouse. All Rights Reserved.

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