Catalogue


American politics : core argument/current controversy /
edited by Peter J. Woolley, Albert R. Papa.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2002.
description
xxii, 477 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0130879193 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Prentice Hall, c2002.
isbn
0130879193 (pbk.)
catalogue key
4704253
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
The rationale for this volume is twofold. The first is to expose students to some of the important arguments of politics that impinge on the great experiment in American government. Every chapter contains recent essays, excerpts, and speeches, but students should see that every current controversy has an ancestry of decades, if not centuries. We hope students will learn, first, to identify the great questions of public affairs in America and next to become familiar with some of the people and arguments that have over many decades or centuries addressed the persistent questions of public affairs.Our second rationale is to provoke a discussion of American politics in the way that politics has, at root, been discussed for millennia. This discussion goes beyond merely describing the laws, the Constitution, the processes--that is, the facts. With these readings, the inquiry of students might be directed toward the proper arrangement of facts in order to test a theory of American politics, as well as to discuss the "ought" that Aristotle says is the true aim of politics. We like to frame our own introductory courses around the question,which theory of American government best describes politics as it is?(See Chapter 1:)Or which theory best describes how politics ought to be? Or which theory has the best explanatory power? Or which has the best predictive power?Another rationale follows the first two: Instructors who wish not to evangelize in the classroom can structure their course around thecompeting theoriesof American politics, allowing students to evaluate the utility of those theories and to confront their own felt notions of political society.The text presents several competing theories:pluralism, elite theory,and that perennial American favorite that we callcivics book democracy.In subsequent chapters, the readings address the usual subtopics of American government but include competing viewpoints and evaluations. Thus, by studying an American government textbook, a student becomes aware of the basic details of American government and politics. But by using this volume of core readings as a supplement, the student also learns how to arrange facts, what the core arguments of public affairs are, what the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics are, and how to apply those theories to current problems. At the end of a semester, the student should have the tools and practice to be an intelligent evaluator of American political dialogue.We have done our best to excerpt, condense, or digest the pieces so that they can be read as easily as possible in a country where the language of common discourse changes rapidly--and where many students have been exposed to only the most watered down and oftentimes third-hand summaries of great controversies.Each chapter includes several articles drawn from historical documents, as well as important scholarly works. These are the core arguments. Each chapter ends with two or more articles that address a current political topic. Judicial rulings and other primary documents are contained in the appendixes.Each excerpt is preceded by an introductory paragraph that contains biographical information about the author and alerts the reader to the subject and perspective of the text. The reader then sets out on a journey with a road map that should help to identify important landmarks along the way and point to the ultimate destination: the author's conclusion.We have discovered that our students prefer to be introduced to and acquainted with the writings of famous historical figures more than with relatively obscure or notorious journalists. And they equally prefer to draw their own conclusions on current controversies once armed with several good arguments. We hope this volume of collected readings will inform, educate, and arm students, whether they be political science major
Introduction or Preface
The rationale for this volume is twofold. The first is to expose students to some of the important arguments of politics that impinge on the great experiment in American government. Every chapter contains recent essays, excerpts, and speeches, but students should see that every current controversy has an ancestry of decades, if not centuries. We hope students will learn, first, to identify the great questions of public affairs in America and next to become familiar with some of the people and arguments that have over many decades or centuries addressed the persistent questions of public affairs. Our second rationale is to provoke a discussion of American politics in the way that politics has, at root, been discussed for millennia. This discussion goes beyond merely describing the laws, the Constitution, the processes--that is, the facts. With these readings, the inquiry of students might be directed toward the proper arrangement of facts in order to test a theory of American politics, as well as to discuss the "ought" that Aristotle says is the true aim of politics. We like to frame our own introductory courses around the question, which theory of American government best describes politics as it is?(See Chapter 1:) Or which theory best describes how politics ought to be? Or which theory has the best explanatory power? Or which has the best predictive power? Another rationale follows the first two: Instructors who wish not to evangelize in the classroom can structure their course around the competing theoriesof American politics, allowing students to evaluate the utility of those theories and to confront their own felt notions of political society. The text presents several competing theories: pluralism, elite theory,and that perennial American favorite that we call civics book democracy.In subsequent chapters, the readings address the usual subtopics of American government but include competing viewpoints and evaluations. Thus, by studying an American government textbook, a student becomes aware of the basic details of American government and politics. But by using this volume of core readings as a supplement, the student also learns how to arrange facts, what the core arguments of public affairs are, what the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics are, and how to apply those theories to current problems. At the end of a semester, the student should have the tools and practice to be an intelligent evaluator of American political dialogue. We have done our best to excerpt, condense, or digest the pieces so that they can be read as easily as possible in a country where the language of common discourse changes rapidly--and where many students have been exposed to only the most watered down and oftentimes third-hand summaries of great controversies. Each chapter includes several articles drawn from historical documents, as well as important scholarly works. These are the core arguments. Each chapter ends with two or more articles that address a current political topic. Judicial rulings and other primary documents are contained in the appendixes. Each excerpt is preceded by an introductory paragraph that contains biographical information about the author and alerts the reader to the subject and perspective of the text. The reader then sets out on a journey with a road map that should help to identify important landmarks along the way and point to the ultimate destination: the author''s conclusion. We have discovered that our students prefer to be introduced to and acquainted with the writings of famous historical figures more than with relatively obscure or notorious journalists. And they equally prefer to draw their own conclusions on current controversies once armed with several good arguments. We hope this volume of collected readings will inform, educate, and arm students, whether they be political science majors, engineers, or auditors, for (and against) political debate throughout their lives.
Introduction or Preface
The rationale for this volume is twofold. The first is to expose students to some of the important arguments of politics that impinge on the great experiment in American government. Every chapter contains recent essays, excerpts, and speeches, but students should see that every current controversy has an ancestry of decades, if not centuries. We hope students will learn, first, to identify the great questions of public affairs in America and next to become familiar with some of the people and arguments that have over many decades or centuries addressed the persistent questions of public affairs. Our second rationale is to provoke a discussion of American politics in the way that politics has, at root, been discussed for millennia. This discussion goes beyond merely describing the laws, the Constitution, the processes--that is, the facts. With these readings, the inquiry of students might be directed toward the proper arrangement of facts in order to test a theory of American politics, as well as to discuss the "ought" that Aristotle says is the true aim of politics. We like to frame our own introductory courses around the question,which theory of American government best describes politics as it is?(See Chapter 1:)Or which theory best describes how politics ought to be? Or which theory has the best explanatory power? Or which has the best predictive power? Another rationale follows the first two: Instructors who wish not to evangelize in the classroom can structure their course around thecompeting theoriesof American politics, allowing students to evaluate the utility of those theories and to confront their own felt notions of political society. The text presents several competing theories:pluralism, elite theory,and that perennial American favorite that we callcivics book democracy.In subsequent chapters, the readings address the usual subtopics of American government but include competing viewpoints and evaluations. Thus, by studying an American government textbook, a student becomes aware of the basic details of American government and politics. But by using this volume of core readings as a supplement, the student also learns how to arrange facts, what the core arguments of public affairs are, what the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics are, and how to apply those theories to current problems. At the end of a semester, the student should have the tools and practice to be an intelligent evaluator of American political dialogue. We have done our best to excerpt, condense, or digest the pieces so that they can be read as easily as possible in a country where the language of common discourse changes rapidly--and where many students have been exposed to only the most watered down and oftentimes third-hand summaries of great controversies. Each chapter includes several articles drawn from historical documents, as well as important scholarly works. These are the core arguments. Each chapter ends with two or more articles that address a current political topic. Judicial rulings and other primary documents are contained in the appendixes. Each excerpt is preceded by an introductory paragraph that contains biographical information about the author and alerts the reader to the subject and perspective of the text. The reader then sets out on a journey with a road map that should help to identify important landmarks along the way and point to the ultimate destination: the author's conclusion. We have discovered that our students prefer to be introduced to and acquainted with the writings of famous historical figures more than with relatively obscure or notorious journalists. And they equally prefer to draw their own conclusions on current controversies once armed with several good arguments. We hope this volume of collected readings will inform, educate, and arm students, whether they be political science major
First Chapter

The rationale for this volume is twofold. The first is to expose students to some of the important arguments of politics that impinge on the great experiment in American government. Every chapter contains recent essays, excerpts, and speeches, but students should see that every current controversy has an ancestry of decades, if not centuries. We hope students will learn, first, to identify the great questions of public affairs in America and next to become familiar with some of the people and arguments that have over many decades or centuries addressed the persistent questions of public affairs.

Our second rationale is to provoke a discussion of American politics in the way that politics has, at root, been discussed for millennia. This discussion goes beyond merely describing the laws, the Constitution, the processes—that is, the facts. With these readings, the inquiry of students might be directed toward the proper arrangement of facts in order to test a theory of American politics, as well as to discuss the "ought" that Aristotle says is the true aim of politics. We like to frame our own introductory courses around the question,which theory of American government best describes politics as it is?(See Chapter 1:)Or which theory best describes how politics ought to be? Or which theory has the best explanatory power? Or which has the best predictive power?

Another rationale follows the first two: Instructors who wish not to evangelize in the classroom can structure their course around thecompeting theoriesof American politics, allowing students to evaluate the utility of those theories and to confront their own felt notions of political society.

The text presents several competing theories:pluralism, elite theory,and that perennial American favorite that we callcivics book democracy.In subsequent chapters, the readings address the usual subtopics of American government but include competing viewpoints and evaluations. Thus, by studying an American government textbook, a student becomes aware of the basic details of American government and politics. But by using this volume of core readings as a supplement, the student also learns how to arrange facts, what the core arguments of public affairs are, what the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics are, and how to apply those theories to current problems. At the end of a semester, the student should have the tools and practice to be an intelligent evaluator of American political dialogue.

We have done our best to excerpt, condense, or digest the pieces so that they can be read as easily as possible in a country where the language of common discourse changes rapidly—and where many students have been exposed to only the most watered down and oftentimes third-hand summaries of great controversies.

Each chapter includes several articles drawn from historical documents, as well as important scholarly works. These are the core arguments. Each chapter ends with two or more articles that address a current political topic. Judicial rulings and other primary documents are contained in the appendixes.

Each excerpt is preceded by an introductory paragraph that contains biographical information about the author and alerts the reader to the subject and perspective of the text. The reader then sets out on a journey with a road map that should help to identify important landmarks along the way and point to the ultimate destination: the author's conclusion.

We have discovered that our students prefer to be introduced to and acquainted with the writings of famous historical figures more than with relatively obscure or notorious journalists. And they equally prefer to draw their own conclusions on current controversies once armed with several good arguments. We hope this volume of collected readings will inform, educate, and arm students, whether they be political science majors, engineers, or auditors, for (and against) political debate throughout their lives.

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Reference & Research Book News, May 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
This book helps readers become intelligent evaluators of American political dialogue by exposing them to high-quality classic and contemporary selections from presidents, philosophers, and political scientists and the great arguments of American politics. It shows readers how to 1) arrangeand rearrangefacts, 2) identify the core arguments of public affairs, 3) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics, and 4) apply those theories to current problems. Combining both core readings in political science and recent arguments on current controversies in each chapter, it shows thecontinuityof political debates over decades and centuries and encourages readers to come to theirownconclusions while evaluating evidence and arguing over theory. The selections are excerpted/condensed for accessibility and chapter overviews and summaries place the readings in context and link the various arguments together.Features essays, excerpts, and speeches--classic, contemporary, and very recent readings--by presidents, philosophers, and political scientists on: The American Political Environment (Theories of American Government; Political Culture and Ideology; The Constitution and the Tradition of the Founders; The Tensions of Federalism); The Process of Democracy (Public Opinion and the Media; Political Parties; Interest Groups); Governmental Institutions (Congress; The Presidency; The Bureaucracy; The Judiciary); American Politics and Public Policy (Civil Rights and Liberties; Government and the Economy; America's International Relations).For anyone interested in American Government or Politics.
Main Description
This book helps readers become intelligent evaluators of American political dialogue by exposing them to high-quality classic and contemporary selections from presidents, philosophers, and political scientists and the great arguments of American politics. It shows readers how to 1) arrange--and rearrange--facts, 2) identify the core arguments of public affairs, 3) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics, and 4) apply those theories to current problems. Combining both core readings in political science and recent arguments on current controversies in each chapter, it shows thecontinuity of political debates over decades and centuries and encourages readers to come to theirown conclusions while evaluating evidence and arguing over theory. The selections are excerpted/condensed for accessibility and chapter overviews and summaries place the readings in context and link the various arguments together. Features essays, excerpts, and speeches--classic, contemporary, and very recent readings--by presidents, philosophers, and political scientists on: The American Political Environment (Theories of American Government; Political Culture and Ideology; The Constitution and the Tradition of the Founders; The Tensions of Federalism); The Process of Democracy (Public Opinion and the Media; Political Parties; Interest Groups); Governmental Institutions (Congress; The Presidency; The Bureaucracy; The Judiciary); American Politics and Public Policy (Civil Rights and Liberties; Government and the Economy; America's International Relations). For anyone interested in American Government or Politics.
Main Description
This book helps readers become intelligent evaluators of American political dialogue by exposing them to high-quality classic and contemporary selections from presidents, philosophers, and political scientists and the great arguments of American politics. It shows readers how to 1) arrange-and rearrange-facts, 2) identify the core arguments of public affairs, 3) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics, and 4) apply those theories to current problems. Combining both core readings in political science and recent arguments on current controversies in each chapter, it shows the continuity of political debates over decades and centuries and encourages readers to come to their own conclusions while evaluating evidence and arguing over theory. The selections are excerpted/condensed for accessibility and chapter overviews and summaries place the readings in context and link the various arguments together. Features essays, excerpts, and speeches--classic, contemporary, and very recent readings--by presidents, philosophers, and political scientists on: The American Political Environment (Theories of American Government; Political Culture and Ideology; The Constitution and the Tradition of the Founders; The Tensions of Federalism); The Process of Democracy (Public Opinion and the Media; Political Parties; Interest Groups); Governmental Institutions (Congress; The Presidency; The Bureaucracy; The Judiciary); American Politics and Public Policy (Civil Rights and Liberties; Government and the Economy; America's International Relations). For anyone interested in American Government or Politics.
Main Description
This book helps readers become intelligent evaluators of American political dialogue by exposing them to high-quality classic and contemporary selections from presidents, philosophers, and political scientists and the great arguments of American politics. It shows readers how to 1) arrangeand rearrangefacts, 2) identify the core arguments of public affairs, 3) evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of various theories of American politics, and 4) apply those theories to current problems. Combining both core readings in political science and recent arguments on current controversies in each chapter, it shows the continuityof political debates over decades and centuries and encourages readers to come to their ownconclusions while evaluating evidence and arguing over theory. The selections are excerpted/condensed for accessibility and chapter overviews and summaries place the readings in context and link the various arguments together.Features essays, excerpts, and speeches--classic, contemporary, and very recent readings--by presidents, philosophers, and political scientists on: The American Political Environment (Theories of American Government; Political Culture and Ideology; The Constitution and the Tradition of the Founders; The Tensions of Federalism); The Process of Democracy (Public Opinion and the Media; Political Parties; Interest Groups); Governmental Institutions (Congress; The Presidency; The Bureaucracy; The Judiciary); American Politics and Public Policy (Civil Rights and Liberties; Government and the Economy; America's International Relations).For anyone interested in American Government or Politics.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xv
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
The American Political Environment
Competing Theories of American Governmentp. 1
Core Readings
Democracy in Americap. 9
Class: America's Dirty Little Secretp. 11
The Power Elite Nowp. 15
The Irony of Democracyp. 20
Who Governs?p. 23
Current Controversy: Is Direct Democracy a Better Way?
From Representative Democracy to Participatory Democracyp. 27
Pitfalls of Direct Democracyp. 30
Political Culture and Ideology: The Air We Breathep. 35
Core Readings
Government as a Contractp. 39
The Mayflower Compactp. 41
Natural Liberalismp. 42
The Gettysburg Addressp. 44
Liberal Culture and Capitalist Societyp. 45
Current Controversy: Divided We Stand: How Deep Do Our Differences Run?
The Cultural War for the Soul of Americap. 47
The Negotiable and Non-negotiable in Our Civic Conversationp. 50
The Constitution and Its Framersp. 52
Core Readings
System of Politicsp. 57
Laws Establishing Political Liberty in a Constitutionp. 59
Obliging the Government to Control Itself (Federalist No. 51)p. 62
An Economic Interpretation of the Constitution of the United Statesp. 65
The Founding Fathers: A Reform Caucus in Actionp. 67
A Reconsideration of the Framers' Intentp. 72
Current Controversy: How Do We Best Achieve Constitutional Change?
Who Interprets? Judicial Review and "Departmentalism"p. 76
Recast Judicial Supremacyp. 82
The Tensions of Federalismp. 86
Core Readings
We the States: Against a Consolidated National Governmentp. 91
Federalist No. 39p. 93
An Incomplete National Governmentp. 97
Current Controversy: Should the National Government Enforce Education Standards for Local Communities?
Washington Bureaucrats versus Community and Parental Valuesp. 102
Making the Grade: Federalism and National Education Reformp. 103
The Processes of Democracy
Public Opinion and the Media: Prologue to a Democratic Farce?p. 107
Core Readings
Why Online Polls Are Bunkp. 113
The Disenchanted Manp. 115
The Nattering Nabobs of Negativismp. 117
Perrier in the Newsroomp. 120
Current Controversy: The Media: Friend, Foe, or Fake?
Culture of Fearp. 123
Rush from Judgment: How the Media Lost Their Bearingsp. 126
Parties and Elections: The Crisis of Electoral Politicsp. 131
Core Readings
The Crisis of Electoral Politicsp. 139
Ballot Blocks: What Gets the Poor to the Polls?p. 142
The Scourge of Partiesp. 147
When Parties Lose, Who Wins?p. 149
Inevitable Losers: The Problem of Presidential Selectionp. 152
Selling Politicians Like Breakfast Cerealp. 157
Money Can't Buy You Lovep. 158
Current Controversy: Wither the Parties?
The Southern Captivity of the GOPp. 161
Third Out: Why the Reform Party's Best Days Are Behind Itp. 167
Interest Groups: Democratic Duty or the Devil's Work?p. 172
Core Readings
Federalist No. 10p. 177
The Scope and Bias of the Pressure Systemp. 181
Interest Group Liberalismp. 184
Political Snipersp. 188
Current Controversy: What Should Be Done about Campaign Finance?
Clean Elections: How Top. 192
The Futile Quest for the Ideal Congressional Campaign Finance Systemp. 195
Governmental Institutions
Congress: A Question of Representationp. 204
Core Readings
The Trusteeship Theory of Representationp. 208
Perceptions of Constituencyp. 209
Congress: The Electoral Connectionp. 213
Congress Against Itselfp. 216
Congressional Governmentp. 218
Current Controversy: The Dilemma of Congressional Leadership
The Rise of the Public Speakershipp. 220
Newt's Legacyp. 226
The Presidency: A Question of Leadershipp. 229
Core Readings
Energy in the Executive (Federalist No. 70)p. 233
Buchanan Presidents, Lincoln Presidents, and Taft Presidentsp. 235
Rating the Presidentsp. 237
Leader or Clerk?p. 243
The Presidential Characterp. 246
Current Controversy: High Crimes and Misdemeanors?
For Impeachmentp. 253
Against Impeachmentp. 255
Bureaucracy: Responding to Whom?p. 258
Core Readings
The Liberal Principles of Decentralized Self-Governmentp. 261
The Junglep. 263
Bureaucracy and Constitutionalismp. 266
Bureaucracy and the American Regimep. 269
Current Controversy: Can We Run Government Like a Business?
Privitization and Public Control: Why Make Public Management More Businesslike?p. 271
The Judiciary: A Question of Legitimacyp. 276
Core Readings
The Least Dangerous Branch (Federalist No. 78)p. 280
The Judiciary's Power to Mold the Governmentp. 283
The Doctrine of Judicial Reviewp. 285
Judicial Self-Restraintp. 287
The Vision of Our Timep. 291
The Steel Seizure Casep. 293
Current Controversy: How Political Must Judicial Appointments Be?
The Confirmation Messp. 300
The Political Courtp. 305
American Politics and Public Policy
Civil Rights and Libertiesp. 308
Core Readings
On Libertyp. 312
The Virginia Statute of Religious Freedomp. 315
What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?p. 316
Uneasy Preferences: Affirmative Action, in Retrospectp. 319
Abortion Politicsp. 325
Dishonoring the Boy Scoutsp. 328
Current Controversy: How Far Shall We Go to Deter Crime?
For the Right to Carryp. 331
Privacy and Surveillance Technology: Do We Really Want the Police Seeing Through Our Clothing?p. 335
Government and the Economyp. 340
Core Readings
Labor and Capital-Partnersp. 344
Redefining the Contractp. 347
Secrets of the Templep. 353
Current Controversy: How Much Should the Government Intervene in the Economy?
For Limiting the Ability to Taxp. 357
Frayed-collar Workers in Gold-plated Timesp. 360
A Modest Suggestion for Modest Governmentp. 364
International Relationsp. 372
Core Readings
The Mischiefs of Foreign Intrigue-and the Impostures of Pretended Patriotismp. 376
The Monroe Doctrinep. 378
War Message: To Vindicate the Principles of Peacep. 379
Half-Truths into the Frenzy of Warp. 384
Support Any Friend, Oppose Any Foep. 386
False Hopes and Alluring Promisesp. 389
Current Controversy: When, How, and For What Should the United States Intervene with Military Force?
Civil War in a Sovereign Nationp. 391
Never Againp. 395
The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of Americap. 399
The Articles of Confederationp. 403
The Constitution of the United Statesp. 411
Judicial Process and Federalismp. 421
Marbury v. Madison (1803)p. 421
McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)p. 424
Youngstown Sheet and Tube Co. et al. v. Sawyer (1952)p. 427
First Amendmentp. 433
Schenck v. U. S. (1919)p. 433
Texas v. Johnson (1989)p. 435
Engel v. Vitale (1962)p. 438
Lynch v. Donnelly (1984)p. 442
Criminal Justicep. 447
Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)p. 447
Miranda v. Arizona (1966)p. 450
Furman v. Georgia (1972)p. 454
Civil Rightsp. 457
Brown v. Board of Education (1954)p. 457
Craig v. Boren (1976)p. 460
Regents of the University of California v. Bakke (1978)p. 462
Privacyp. 465
Griswold v. Connecticut (1965)p. 465
Roe v. Wade (1973)p. 469
Boy Scouts of America et al. v. Dale (2000)p. 472
Competing Theories of American Governmentp. 477
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