Catalogue


Choctaws in a revolutionary age, 1750-1830 /
Greg O'Brien.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2002.
description
xxvii, 158 p. : map.
ISBN
0803235690 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2002.
isbn
0803235690 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4701380
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A significant step forward, one of a small number of recent southeastern Indian histories that begin by taking native cultures seriously and viewing Choctaw beliefs and understandings of the world as crucial to the ways in which native people acted and reacted as historical actors. . . . O''Brien is to be commended for attempting this difficult and necessary work."Jason Baird Jackson,The Alabama Review
"A significant step forward, one of a small number of recent southeastern Indian histories that begin by taking native cultures seriously and viewing Choctaw beliefs and understandings of the world as crucial to the ways in which native people acted and reacted as historical actors. . . . O''Brien is to be commended for attempting this difficult and necessary work."-Jason Baird Jackson, The Alabama Review
"A significant step forward, one of a small number of recent southeastern Indian histories that begin by taking native cultures seriously and viewing Choctaw beliefs and understandings of the world as crucial to the ways in which native people acted and reacted as historical actors. . . . O'Brien is to be commended for attempting this difficult and necessary work."Jason Baird Jackson, The Alabama Review
"Greg O'Brian carefully contextualizes the internal dynamics of kinship and spiritual authority with the external forces of European settler encroachment and trade to analyze how the Choctaw accommodated, yet maintained, their traditional culture in an era of revolutionary change. . . . This book is an important starting point for reassessing the evolution of the Choctaw and their neighbors in the second half of the eighteenth century."Allan Gallay,The American Historical Review
"Greg O'Brian carefully contextualizes the internal dynamics of kinship and spiritual authority with the external forces of European settler encroachment and trade to analyze how the Choctaw accommodated, yet maintained, their traditional culture in an era of revolutionary change. . . . This book is an important starting point for reassessing the evolution of the Choctaw and their neighbors in the second half of the eighteenth century."-Allan Gallay, The American Historical Review
"Greg O'Brian carefully contextualizes the internal dynamics of kinship and spiritual authority with the external forces of European settler encroachment and trade to analyze how the Choctaw accommodated, yet maintained, their traditional culture in an era of revolutionary change. . . . This book is an important starting point for reassessing the evolution of the Choctaw and their neighbors in the second half of the eighteenth century."Allan Gallay, The American Historical Review
"O''Brien''s work is solid and the research impeccable."The Chronicles of Oklahoma
"O''Brien''s work is solid and the research impeccable."-The Chronicles of Oklahoma
"O'Brien's work is solid and the research impeccable." The Chronicles of Oklahoma
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is the story of the Choctaws as told through the lives of two very different leaders, Taboca and Franchimastabé, during a period a period of revolutionary change, 1750-1830. The careers of these leaders signal the receding of the traditional mystical world and the dawning of the market-oriented one.
Main Description
This evocative story of the Choctaws is told through the lives of two remarkable leaders, Taboca and Franchimastabé, during a period of revolutionary change, 1750-1830. Both men achieved recognition as warriors in the eighteenth century but then followed very different paths of leadership. Taboca was a traditional Choctaw leader, a "prophet-chief" whose authority was deeply rooted in the spiritual realm. The foundation of Franchimastabé's power was more externally driven, resting on trade with Europeans and American colonists and the acquisition of manufactured goods. Franchimastabé responded to shifting circumstances outside the Choctaw nation by pushing the source of authority in novel directions, straddling spiritual and economic power in a way unfathomable to Taboca. The careers of these leaders signal a watershed moment in Choctaw history - the receding of a traditional mystically oriented world and the dawning of a new market-oriented one. At once engaging and informative, Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 1750-1830 highlights the efforts of a nation to preserve its integrity and reform its strength in an increasingly complicated, multicultural world.
Main Description
This evocative story of the Choctaws is told through the lives of two remarkable leaders, Taboca and Franchimastabe, during a period of revolutionary change, 1750-1830. Both men achieved recognition as warriors in the eighteenth century but then followed very different paths of leadership. Taboca was a traditional Choctaw leader, a "prophet-chief" whose authority was deeply rooted in the spiritual realm. The foundation of Franchimastabe's power was more externally driven, resting on trade with Europeans and American colonists and the acquisition of manufactured goods. Franchimastabe responded to shifting circumstances outside the Choctaw nation by pushing the source of authority in novel directions, straddling spiritual and economic power in a way unfathomable to Taboca. The careers of these leaders signal a watershed moment in Choctaw history the receding of a traditional mystically oriented world and the dawning of a new market-oriented one. At once engaging and informative, Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 17501830 highlights the efforts of a nation to preserve its integrity and reform its strength in an increasingly complicated, multicultural world.
Main Description
This evocative story of the Choctaws is told through the lives of two remarkable leaders, Taboca and Franchimastabe, during a period of revolutionary change, 1750-1830. Both men achieved recognition as warriors in the eighteenth century but then followed very different paths of leadership. Taboca was a traditional Choctaw leader, a "prophet-chief" whose authority was deeply rooted in the spiritual realm. The foundation of Franchimastabe's power was more externally driven, resting on trade with Europeans and American colonists and the acquisition of manufactured goods. Franchimastabe responded to shifting circumstances outside the Choctaw nation by pushing the source of authority in novel directions, straddling spiritual and economic power in a way unfathomable to Taboca. The careers of these leaders signal a watershed moment in Choctaw history the receding of a traditional mystically oriented world and the dawning of a new market-oriented one.At once engaging and informative, Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 17501830 highlights the efforts of a nation to preserve its integrity and reform its strength in an increasingly complicated, multicultural world.
Main Description
This innovative study looks closely and evocatively at the lives of the Choctaws during a period of revolutionary change, 1750-1830. The story of the Choctaws is told through the lives of two remarkable leaders-Taboca and Franchimastabeacute;. Both began as noted warriors in the eighteenth century but then followed very different paths of leadership. Taboca was a traditional Choctaw leader, a "prophet-chief" whose authority was deeply rooted in the spiritual realm. The foundation of Franchimastabeacute;'s power was more externally driven, resting on trade with Europeans and American colonists and the acquisition of manufactured goods. Franchimastabeacute; responded to shifting circumstances outside the Choctaw nation by pushing the source of authority in novel directions, straddling spiritual and economic power in a way unfathomable to Taboca. The parallel careers of these leaders signal a watershed moment in Choctaw history-the receding of a traditional mystical-oriented world and the dawning of a new market-oriented one. At once engaging and informative,Choctaws in a Revolutionary Age, 1750-1830highlights the efforts of a nation to preserve its integrity and reform its strength in an increasingly complicated, multicultural world. Greg O'Brien is an assistant professor of history at the University of Southern Mississippi.
Table of Contents
Series Editors' Introductionp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgementsp. xiii
Introductionp. xv
Choctaws and Powerp. 1
The Multiethnic Confederacyp. 12
Warriors, Warfare, and Male Powerp. 27
Power Derived from the Outside Worldp. 50
Trading for Powerp. 70
Otherworldly Power and Power in Transitionp. 98
Notesp. 115
Selected Bibliographyp. 145
Indexp. 153
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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