Catalogue

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"The blood of our sons" : men, women, and the renegotiation of British citizenship during the Great War /
Nicoletta F. Gullace.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
description
284 p. : ill.
ISBN
0312294468
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
isbn
0312294468
catalogue key
4701152
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nicoletta F. Gullace is the Hortense Cavis Shepard Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire, where she teaches history and international affairs.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
Most studies of the British women's suffrage movement end in 1914, implying that the women's case had been made by then and that WW I merely delayed the enactment of suffrage legislation until 1918. Gullace (Univ. of New Hampshire) argues instead that wartime cultural developments that changed the way Britons viewed citizenship rights were responsible for that reform. During the war, male conscientious objectors were deprived of their voting rights for refusing military service. But by making national service, rather than maleness, the basis for voting, Parliament opened the door to women. Women engaged in multiple forms of national service, as munitions workers and recruiting agents, for example; the latter shamed able-bodied male civilians into military service by handing white feathers to "shirkers." Instead of viewing Emmeline Pankhurst's wartime "rabid nationalism" as an embarrassing aberration, Gullace portrays it as a shrewd move that undermined stereotypes of women as pacifists, contributing significantly to suffrage reform. This is an important study that should be widely read by those interested in WW I and British women's history. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. H. L. Smith University of Houston--Victoria
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book brings feminist history and political history together in new and refreshing ways. Votes for women came during the war and because of the war: here is a major revision of current scholarship and a vibrant and important interpretation of political rights as negotiated rights. When male conscientious objectors refused to serve their country in uniform, at the same time as one million women took up the tools of war-related production, the debate over the vote for both men and women was transformed. We should be grateful to Gullace for her reminder that contingency matters, and that cultural history is political history written from a new and exciting perspective. Here is a striking kind of history likely to set the pattern for research in this field in coming years." Jay Winter, Professor of History, Yale University "A rich and original study of the remarkable transformation of the meanings of citizenship in Britain in the course of the First World War. Nicoletta Gullace shows in vivid and convincing detail how the images of men and women were refashioned in the crucible of total war. The book is a major contribution to the history of both gender relations and nation building." John Gillis, Professor of History, Rutgers University "The Blood of Our Sons provides a new and original argument about a long-established problem in British history the granting of women's suffrage after the First World War and her version is a tonic." Susan Kent, Professor of History and Women's Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder "Gullace offers a very fresh look at the extremely important historical subject of the British experience of World War I." Angela Woollacott, Case Western University
"This book brings feminist history and political history together in new and refreshing ways. Votes for women came during the war and because of the war: here is a major revision of current scholarship and a vibrant and important interpretation of political rights as negotiated rights. When male conscientious objectors refused to serve their country in uniform, at the same time as one million women took up the tools of war-related production, the debate over the vote for both men and women was transformed. We should be grateful to Gullace for her reminder that contingency matters, and that cultural history is political history written from a new and exciting perspective. Here is a striking kind of history likely to set the pattern for research in this field in coming years."--Jay Winter, Professor of History, Yale University "A rich and original study of the remarkable transformation of the meanings of citizenship in Britain in the course of the First World War. Nicoletta Gullace shows in vivid and convincing detail how the images of men and women were refashioned in the crucible of total war. The book is a major contribution to the history of both gender relations and nation building."--John Gillis, Professor of History, Rutgers University "The Blood of Our Sons provides a new and original argument about a long-established problem in British history the granting of women's suffrage after the First World War--and her version is a tonic."--Susan Kent, Professor of History and Women's Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder "Gullace offers a very fresh look at the extremely important historical subject of the British experience of World War I."--Angela Woollacott, Case Western University
"This book brings feminist history and political history together in new and refreshing ways. Votes for women came during the war and because of the war: here is a major revision of current scholarship and a vibrant and important interpretation of political rights as negotiated rights. When male conscientious objectors refused to serve their country in uniform, at the same time as one million women took up the tools of war-related production, the debate over the vote for both men and women was transformed. We should be grateful to Gullace for her reminder that contingency matters, and that cultural history is political history written from a new and exciting perspective. Here is a striking kind of history likely to set the pattern for research in this field in coming years."--Jay Winter, Professor of History, Yale University "A rich and original study of the remarkable transformation of the meanings of citizenship in Britain in the course of the First World War. Nicoletta Gullace shows in vivid and convincing detail how the images of men and women were refashioned in the crucible of total war. The book is a major contribution to the history of both gender relations and nation building."--John Gillis, Professor of History, Rutgers University " The Blood of Our Sons provides a new and original argument about a long-established problem in British history the granting of women's suffrage after the First World War--and her version is a tonic."--Susan Kent, Professor of History and Women's Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder "Gullace offers a very fresh look at the extremely important historical subject of the British experience of World War I."--Angela Woollacott, Case Western University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Winner of the 2003 North American Conference on British Studies Annual Book Prize!In this extraordinary study of the complex relationship between war, gender, and citizenship in Great Britain during World War I, Nicoletta F. Gullace shows how the assault on civilian masculinity led directly to women's suffrage. Through recruiting activities such as handing out white feathers to reputed "cowards" and offering petticoats to unenlisted "shirkers," female war enthusiasts drew national attention to the fact that manhood alone was an inadequate marker of civic responsibility. Proclaiming women's exemplary service to the nation, feminist organizations tapped into a public culture that celebrated military service while denigrating those who opposed the war. Drawing on a vast range of popular and official sources, Gullace reveals that the war had revolutionary implications for women who wished to vote and for men who were expected to fight.
Main Description
Winner of the 2003 North American Conference on British Studies Annual Book Prize! In this extraordinary study of the complex relationship between war, gender, and citizenship in Great Britain during World War I, Nicoletta F. Gullace shows how the assault on civilian masculinity led directly to women's suffrage. Through recruiting activities such as handing out white feathers to reputed "cowards" and offering petticoats to unenlisted "shirkers," female war enthusiasts drew national attention to the fact that manhood alone was an inadequate marker of civic responsibility. Proclaiming women's exemplary service to the nation, feminist organizations tapped into a public culture that celebrated military service while denigrating those who opposed the war. Drawing on a vast range of popular and official sources, Gullace reveals that the war had revolutionary implications for women who wished to vote and for men who were expected to fight.
Main Description
Winner of the 2003 North American Conference on British Studies Annual Book Prize! In this extraordinary study of the complex relationship between war, gender, and citizenship in Great Britain during World War I, Nicoletta F. Gullace shows how the assault on civilian masculinity led directly to women's suffrage. Through recruiting activities such as handing out white feathers to reputed Â"cowardsÂ" and offering petticoats to unenlisted Â"shirkers,Â" female war enthusiasts drew national attention to the fact that manhood alone was an inadequate marker of civic responsibility. Proclaiming women's exemplary service to the nation, feminist organizations tapped into a public culture that celebrated military service while denigrating those who opposed the war. Drawing on a vast range of popular and official sources, Gullace reveals that the war had revolutionary implications for women who wished to vote and for men who were expected to fight.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Propaganda and the Public Mind
The Rape of Belgium and Wartime Imaginationp. 17
The Making of Tommy Atkins: Masculinity, Propaganda, and the Triumph of Family Valuesp. 35
Redrawing the Boundaries of the Private Sphere: Patriotic Motherhood and the Raising of Kitchener's Armiesp. 53
Shaming Rituals and Sexual Identity
The Order of the White Featherp. 73
Conscription, Conscience, and the Travails of Male Citizenshipp. 99
Reinventing Womanhood: Suffragettes and the Great War for Citizenshipp. 117
The Cultural Construction of the Law
The Power of Sacrifice: "Physical Force" and Women's Workp. 145
Votes for Whom? The Ideological Origins of the Representation of the People Billp. 167
Epiloguep. 195
Notesp. 199
Selected Bibliographyp. 253
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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