Catalogue


Literate experience : the work of knowing in seventeenth-century English writing /
Andrew Barnaby and Lisa J. Schnell.
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2002.
description
x, 243 p.
ISBN
0312293518
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Palgrave, 2002.
isbn
0312293518
catalogue key
4701143
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Literate Experience/ offers a richly suggestive analysis of the relations between science, politics, and literature in Stuart England." --Debora Shuger, UCLA
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Summaries
Main Description
Literate Experience argues for the existence of certain shared patterns of intellectual association in the English seventeenth century, patterns that follow the outlines of Bacon's project of epistemological reform. Bacon's project offered a theory of how knowing as a private act could be transformed into a public one, an act related to the creation and maintenance of public authority. The question thus becomes, how did thinkers in the period reimagine civil society as a polity of knowledge? This study traces out a variety of answers to that question, ranging from the Royal Society's communal rhetoric to the work of four literary writers who, in a variety of ways, problematize the notion that political society exists as a community of shared knowledge.
Main Description
Literate Experienceargues for the existence of certain shared patterns of intellectual association in the English seventeenth century, patterns that follow the outlines of Bacon's project of epistemological reform. Bacon's project offered a theory of how knowing as a private act could be transformed into a public one, an act related to the creation and maintenance of public authority. The question thus becomes, how did thinkers in the period reimagine civil society as a polity of knowledge? This study traces out a variety of answers to that question, ranging from the Royal Society's communal rhetoric to the work of four literary writers who, in a variety of ways, problematize the notion that political society exists as a community of shared knowledge.
Table of Contents
Anatomy Lessons: Experimental Discourse and the Beginnings of the Public Sphere (Bacon to Locke)
“A Comune Beholdyng Place”: The Scene of Knowledge in Measure for Measure
“So great a diffrence is there in degree”: Aemelia Lanyer and the Critique of Aristocratic Privilege
Affecting the Metaphysics: Andrew Marvell's Discourse of Love and the Trials of Public Speech at Midcentury
“Matter of Fact”: Truth, Evidence and Discourse in the Late Prose of Aphra Behn
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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