Catalogue


The emergence of the modern German novel : Christoph Martin Wieland, Sophie von La Roche, and Maria Anna Sagar /
Claire Baldwin.
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House, 2002.
description
262 p. : 1 ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1571131671 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Rochester, NY : Camden House, 2002.
isbn
1571131671 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4693325
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [181]-205) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-11-01:
In the late 18th century, German scholars codified aesthetic theory for the novel, establishing it as a legitimate genre separate from the noble epic and the frivolous romance. Especially important in this effort was Friedrich von Blankenburg's Versuch uber den Roman (1774), but Baldwin (Colgate Univ.) illustrates that the debate over the novel was not just, or even primarily, external to it, but often part of the structure of novels of this period. By offering close readings of two bildungsroman (Wieland's Don Sylvio von Rosalva and Agathon) and two Frauenromane, i.e., women's novels (La Roche's Sternheim and Sagar's Karolinen's Tagebuch) as metafictions, the author delves into the major literary debate of this period from a new angle. Her approach reveals the similarity of, and breaks down the differences between, bildungsroman and Frauenromane, genres thought vastly different. By reading the novels as metafictions that provide models of the progressive theory they advocate, Baldwin shows how the controversy over the novel occurring about 1770 not only influenced these works, but contributed greatly to making Agathon and Sternheim classics of German literature. Including an extensive bibliography and a practical index, this book will serve upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. C. Conard University of Dayton
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2002
Choice, November 2002
Choice, November 2003
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Summaries
Main Description
This book treats both the literary history of the modern German novel and theoretical considerations about gender and 18th-century narrative strategies. It attempts to overcome a two-fold division in scholarship by treating Christoph Martin Wieland's Geschichte des Agathon and Sophie von La Roche's Geschichte des Fräuleins von Sternheim, the two novels generally considered to be foundational in the development of the German Bildungsroman, in conjunction, rather than as examples of unrelated traditions, and by considering the reciprocal influence of fictional and theoretical writing dealing with the developing genre of the modern German novel. Baldwin also examines Wieland's Don Sylvio and Maria Anna Sagar's Karolinens Tagebuch and analyzes how gender as a relative construct functions in each of the four texts. In so doing she shows how the new German novel of the 1770s aligns reading and narrative practices with gendered attributes to establish narrative authority and cultural legitimacy for the new stories of identity they explore. The interpretations proceed from an analysis of the ways that reading and narration are represented in the novels, and in their poetological prefaces, to show that the texts take up, challenge, and contribute to contemporary literary and social theories of the novel.Claire Baldwin is assistant professor of German at Colgate Unversity in Hamilton, New York.
Main Description
This book treats both the literary history of the modern German novel and theoretical considerations about gender and 18th-century narrative strategies. It attempts to overcome a two-fold division in scholarship by treating Christoph Martin Wieland's Geschichte des Agathon and Sophie von La Roche's Geschichte des Fr+uleins von Sternheim, the two novels generally considered to be foundational in the development of the German Bildungsroman, in conjunction, rather than as examples of unrelated traditions, and by considering the reciprocal influence of fictional and theoretical writing dealing with the developing genre of the modern German novel. Baldwin also examines Wieland's Don Sylvio and Maria Anna Sagar's Karolinens Tagebuch and analyzes how gender as a relative construct functions in each of the four texts. In so doing she shows how the new German novel of the 1770s aligns reading and narrative practices with gendered attributes to establish narrative authority and cultural legitimacy for the new stories of identity they explore. The interpretations proceed from an analysis of the ways that reading and narration are represented in the novels, and in their poetological prefaces, to show that the texts take up, challenge, and contribute to contemporary literary and social theories of the novel.Claire Baldwin is assistant professor of German at Colgate Unversity in Hamilton, New York.
Main Description
This book treats both the literary history of the modern German novel and theoretical considerations about gender and 18th-century narrative strategies. It attempts to overcome a two-fold division in scholarship by treating Christoph Martin Wieland's Geschichte des Agathon and Sophie von La Roche's Geschichte des Fr uleins von Sternheim, the two novels generally considered to be foundational in the development of the German Bildungsroman, in conjunction, rather than as examples of unrelated traditions, and by considering the reciprocal influence of fictional and theoretical writing dealing with the developing genre of the modern German novel. Baldwin also examines Wieland's Don Sylvio and Maria Anna Sagar's Karolinens Tagebuch and analyzes how gender as a relative construct functions in each of the four texts. In so doing she shows how the new German novel of the 1770s aligns reading and narrative practices with gendered attributes to establish narrative authority and cultural legitimacy for the new stories of identity they explore. The interpretations proceed from an analysis of the ways that reading and narration are represented in the novels, and in their poetological prefaces, to show that the texts take up, challenge, and contribute to contemporary literary and social theories of the novel.Claire Baldwin is assistant professor of German at Colgate Unversity in Hamilton, New York.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume looks at both the literary history of the modern German novel and theoretical considerations about gender and 18th-century narrative strategies.
Unpaid Annotation
A study of the rise of the German novel viewed from a feminist standpoint.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
The Powers of Desire: The Debate on the Novel in Eighteenth-Century Germanyp. 13
Theoretical Discourse on the Novelp. 14
Images of Readers and Their Desiresp. 26
Anthropology, Literature, Genderp. 29
The Pleasures of Fiction: Christoph Martin Wieland's Der Sieg der Natur uber die Schwarmerey oder Die Abentheuer des Don Sylvio von Rosalvap. 38
The Demands of Reading: a Satirical Prefacep. 41
The Female Quixote: Donna Mencia as Adversary of the Narrativep. 46
Symbolic Siblingsp. 53
Hyacinthe's Tales of Virtuep. 54
Don Sylvio's Tales of Enchantmentp. 58
Little Pedro's Old Wives' Talesp. 62
Narrative Reliability: "Biribinker"p. 70
Seductive Strategies and the Promise of Knowledge: Wieland's Geschichte des Agathonp. 73
Seductive Arts: Agathon's Aesthetic Educationp. 77
Danae's Autobiographical Tale: A Model Poetic Narrativep. 85
Telling Tales of Virtuep. 93
A Story of Her Own: Sophie von La Roche's Geschichte des Frauleins von Sternheimp. 103
Wieland's Prefacep. 105
The Female Editorp. 112
Virtue Rewarded or Virtue Betrayed?p. 113
"A New Genre of Character"p. 121
Compiling Sternheim's Storyp. 128
The Legitimation of Desirep. 137
Narrating Nothing: Maria Anna Sagar's Karolinens Tagebuch ohne ausserordentliche Handlungen, oder gerade so viel als gar keinep. 141
Defining the "Nothing" of the Novelp. 143
The Writing Heroine Karolinep. 146
Stories of Silence: The Adventures of Eleonora Lusanip. 150
"The History of the Duchess v. ***"p. 155
Karoline's Authorial Profilesp. 160
Karoline's Conflicting Plots of Authorship and Marriagep. 167
Disclosing the Fiction of Marriage as Closurep. 169
Epilogue: Caveat Lectorp. 176
Works Consultedp. 181
Notesp. 207
Indexp. 253
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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