Catalogue


Beyond the shadow of Camptown : Korean military brides in America /
Ji-Yeon Yuh.
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2002.
description
xvii, 283 p.
ISBN
0814796982 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
series title
imprint
New York : New York University Press, c2002.
isbn
0814796982 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4693239
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 265-278) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-03-01:
Yuh (Northwestern Univ.) has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. She deftly presents the ways that gender, nationality, race and ethnicity, the dynamics of US-Korean relations, and the processes of globalization have shaped the everyday choices of the thousands of Korean women who married US soldiers and entered the country as immigrant wives. With her elegant prose, Yuh interweaves compelling oral histories of individual Korean "international women" with her insightful analysis of women's roles within the politics of marriage, family, immigration, Americanization, Korean nationalism, and US military expansion. Delving into how these woman face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource for US history courses, particularly those with an emphasis on identity formation, immigration, Asian Pacific Americans, international relations, and militarization as well as interdisciplinary collections in Asian Pacific US studies, Asian studies, American studies, women's studies, and sociology. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels and collections. K. J. Leong Arizona State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"By studying the lives and history of Korean &38220;military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns is sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history."
"By studying the lives and history of Korean &38220;military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns is sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history." - Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley
"By studying the lives and history of Korean 38220;military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories,Beyond the Shadow of the Camptownsis sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history." - Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley
"Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women's agency and dignity with skill and compassion."
"Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women's agency and dignity with skill and compassion." - K. Scott Wong, Williams College
"One could scarcely find a more informative and engaging guide than this book, distilled from the award-winning tours developed over the last decade by Big Onion Walking Tours...It is a delight, deeply knowledgeable, presented with wit and style. Would that more historians engage the public so well." - New York History, Spring 2002
"Sensitive and absorbing, Beyond the Shadow of Camptown probes a little-known but fascinating aspect of Asian-American history: the lives of nearly 100,000 Korean women who married American soldiers, and often live a silent, marginal existence in the United States. Professor Yuh gives eloquent voice to these women, linking their diaspora to a gripping and original account of the often appalling circumstances of American military occupation in Korea, while also locating many heartening stories of personal empowerment and triumph over the odds."
"Sensitive and absorbing, Beyond the Shadow of Camptown probes a little-known but fascinating aspect of Asian-American history: the lives of nearly 100,000 Korean women who married American soldiers, and often live a silent, marginal existence in the United States. Professor Yuh gives eloquent voice to these women, linking their diaspora to a gripping and original account of the often appalling circumstances of American military occupation in Korea, while also locating many heartening stories of personal empowerment and triumph over the odds." - Bruce Cumings, author of Korea's Place in the Sun
"Sensitive and absorbing,Beyond the Shadow of Camptownprobes a little-known but fascinating aspect of Asian-American history: the lives of nearly 100,000 Korean women who married American soldiers, and often live a silent, marginal existence in the United States. Professor Yuh gives eloquent voice to these women, linking their diaspora to a gripping and original account of the often appalling circumstances of American military occupation in Korea, while also locating many heartening stories of personal empowerment and triumph over the odds." - Bruce Cumings, author ofKorea's Place in the Sun
( "The founders of the acclaimed Big Onion Walking Tours outline 10 historical walks in their home borough, from America's first pencil factory to Bedford-Stuyvesant's beautiful row houses to Coney Island." )-( San Francisco Chronicle ),()
"Where do marriage, diaspora, racism, and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh's engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living."
"Where do marriage, diaspora, racism, and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh's engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living." - Cynthia Enloe, author of Maneuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives
"Where do marriage, diaspora, racism, and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh's engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living." - Cynthia Enloe, author ofManeuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives
"Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended."
"Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended." - Choice
"Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended." -Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Since the start of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the US as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research, this text tells the stories of these women.
Main Description
Beyond the Shadoe of Camptown is a readable and poignant piece of scholarship. There is much worth praising in this book. -Brandon Palmer, University of Hawaii at Manoa In general, the fluid writing style demonstrates Yuh's background in journalsm, and helps explain why this work made its way from dissertation to hardcover so rapidly. It is a study that demands attention from scholars of foreign relations and migration between Korea and the United States, and deserves attention from ethnic studies scholars and immigration scholars as well.-Journal of American Ethnic History Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended. -Choice Ji-Yeon Yuh's book poignantly illustrates the human costs and benefits of militarized migration in the context of American-Korean relations. -The Journal of Asian Studies Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women's agency and dignity with skill and compassion. -K. Scott Wong, Williams College Ji-Yeon Yuh's study is to be commended on several counts, not the least of which is the unique prism (dust jacket) she gives the contemporary reader into the social and cultural contract between Korea and the United States, clearly a template that we would be advised to heed in these troubled times. - The Journal of American History By studying the lives and history of Korean military brides, Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns is sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history. -Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley Impeccably researched and seamlessly executed. -Bitch Magazine IThis is one of the most compelling books I have read this year...Ji-Yeon Yuh's account is alternately heart breaking and inspiring. - Comparative/World Where do marriage, diaspora, racism and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh's engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living. -Cynthia Enloe, author of Maneuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America, immigration historian Ji-Yeon Yuh explores how Korean women relate to American men in these cross-cultural relationships, and how the military link between the dominant U.S. and subservient Korea tends to complicate their marriages, already challenging for many other reasons, with a dose of international politics as well. -Korean Quarterly Through compelling oral histories, she traces the lives of women form successive generations of brides. -Chronicle of Higher Education Since the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean w
Main Description
Beyond the Shadoe of Camptownis a readable and poignant piece of scholarship. There is much worth praising in this book.-Brandon Palmer, University of Hawaii at Manoa "In general, the fluid writing style demonstrates Yuh's background in journalsm, and helps explain why this work made its way from dissertation to hardcover so rapidly. It is a study that demands attention from scholars of foreign relations and migration between Korea and the United States, and deserves attention from ethnic studies scholars and immigration scholars as well."-Journal of American Ethnic History"Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh's masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended."-Choice"Ji-Yeon Yuh's book poignantly illustrates the human costs and benefits of militarized migration in the context of American-Korean relations."-The Journal of Asian Studies"Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women's agency and dignity with skill and compassion."-K. Scott Wong, Williams College"Ji-Yeon Yuh's study is to be commended on several counts, not the least of which is the "unique prism" (dust jacket) she gives the contemporary reader into the social and cultural contract between Korea and the United States, clearly a template that we would be advised to heed in these troubled times."-The Journal of American History"By studying the lives and history of Korean "military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories,Beyond the Shadow of the Camptownsis sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history."-Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley"Impeccably researched and seamlessly executed."-Bitch Magazine"IThis is one of the most compelling books I have read this year...Ji-Yeon Yuh's account is alternately heart breaking and inspiring."-Comparative/World"Where do marriage, diaspora, racism and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh's engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living."-Cynthia Enloe, author ofManeuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives"Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America, immigration historian Ji-Yeon Yuh explores how Korean women relate to American men in these cross-cultural relationships, and how the military link between the dominant U.S. and subservient Korea tends to complicate their marriages, already challenging for many other reasons, with a dose of international politics as well."-Korean Quarterly"Through compelling oral histories, she traces the lives of women form successive generations of brides."-Chronicle of Higher EducationSince the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research,Beyond the Shadow of the Camptownstells the stories of thes
Main Description
Since the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns tells the stories of these women, from their presumed association with U.S. military camptowns and prostitution to their struggles within the intercultural families they create in the United States. Historian Ji-Yeon Yuh argues that military brides are a unique prism through which to view cultural and social contact between Korea and the U.S. After placing these women within the context of Korean-U.S. relations and the legacies of both Japanese and U.S. colonialism vis vis military prostitution, Yuh goes on to explore their lives, their coping strategies with their new families, and their relationships with their Korean families and homeland. Topics range from the personal--the role of food in their lives--to the communalthe efforts of military wives to form support groups that enable them to affirm Korean identity that both American and Koreans would deny them. Relayed with warmth and compassion, this is the first in-depth study of Korean military brides, and is a groundbreaking contribution to Asian American, women's, and "new" immigrant studies, while also providing a unique approach to military history.
Main Description
Since the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research,Beyond the Shadow of the Camptownstells the stories of these women, from their presumed association with U.S. military camptowns and prostitution to their struggles within the intercultural families they create in the United States.Historian Ji-Yeon Yuh argues that military brides are a unique prism through which to view cultural and social contact between Korea and the U.S. After placing these women within the context of Korean-U.S. relations and the legacies of both Japanese and U.S. colonialism vis รก vis military prostitution, Yuh goes on to explore their lives, their coping strategies with their new families, and their relationships with their Korean families and homeland. Topics range from the personal--the role of food in their lives--to the communal the efforts of military wives to form support groups that enable them to affirm Korean identity that both American and Koreans would deny them.Relayed with warmth and compassion, this is the first in-depth study of Korean military brides, and is a groundbreaking contribution to Asian American, women's, and "new" immigrant studies, while also providing a unique approach to military history.
Main Description
Visit the Big Onion Guide to New York City site at www.nyupress.org/bigonion Whether you're a tourist or a native New Yorker, you will appreciate this witty, informative walking guide to New York City, as authors Seth Kamil and Eric Wakin peel back the layers of New York's most popular neighborhoods. Here in one volume are their award-winning tours. In their "Immigrant New York" tour you can take a walk on the Bowery, the most infamous street in the city and learn how the city's finest roadway became America's "Skid Row." In "Before Stonewall" you'll discover the many facets of gay and lesbian history and trace the development of Greenwich Village as a cultural mecca. From SoHo to the Upper West Side; from Harlem to Brooklyn there's something in The Big Onion Guide for everyone. The authors show how it was nothing new when Mayor Giuliani was unable to ban sales by immigrant mobile food vendors. The Guide takes us to the place where the Dutch tried to ban street side sales by Scottish peddlers 350 years ago, and where the great Fiorello La Guardia banned most of the pushcart salesmen at midcentury. But Kamil and Wakin are not nostalgists or preservationists. Instead, their historical tours connect today's city with the snapshots of yesterday, blending social and cultural history with the evolution of different ethnic and cultural communities. The Big Onion Guide includes ten walking tours, plus a 5-borough driving tour, peppered with informative sidebars, illustrations, and photos from the collection at the New-York Historical Society.
Unpaid Annotation
"Beyond the Shadoe of Camptown is a readable and poignant piece of scholarship. There is much worth praising in this book." -Brandon Palmer, University of Hawaii at Manoa"In general, the fluid writing style demonstrates Yuh''s background in journalsm, and helps explain why this work made its way from dissertation to hardcover so rapidly. It is a study that demands attention from scholars of foreign relations and migration between Korea and the United States, and deserves attention from ethnic studies scholars and immigration scholars as well."-Journal of American Ethnic History "Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and alienation from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh''s masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended." -Choice"Ji-Yeon Yuh''s book poignantly illustrates the human costs and benefits of militarized migration in the context of American-Korean relations." -The Journal of Asian Studies"Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women''s agency and dignity with skill and compassion." -K. Scott Wong, Williams College "Ji-Yeon Yuh''s study is to be commended on several counts, not the least of which is the "unique prism" (dust jacket) she gives the contemporary reader into the social and cultural contract between Korea and the United States, clearly a template that we would be advised to heed in these troubled times." - The Journal of American History "By studying the lives and history of Korean "military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns is sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history." -Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley "Impeccably researched and seamlessly executed." -Bitch Magazine "IThis is one of the most compelling books I have read this year...Ji-Yeon Yuh''s account is alternately heart breaking and inspiring." - Comparative/World "Where do marriage, diaspora, racism and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh''s engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living." -Cynthia Enloe, author of Maneuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women''s Lives "Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America, immigration historian Ji-Yeon Yuh explores how Korean women relate to American men in these cross-cultural relationships, and how the military link between the dominant U.S. and subservient Korea tends to complicate their marriages, already challenging for many other reasons, with a dose of international politics as well." -Korean Quarterly"Through compelling oral histories, she traces the lives of women form successive generations of brides." -Chronicle of Higher EducationSince the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns tells the stories of these women, from their presumed association with U.S. military camptowns and prostitution to their struggles within the intercultural families they create in the United States. Historian Ji-Yeon Yuh argues that military brides are a unique prism through which to view cultural and social contact between Korea and the U.S. After placing these women within the context of Korean-U.S. relations and the legacies of both Japanese and U.S. colonialism vis ? vis military prostitution, Yuh goes on to explore their lives, their coping strategies with their new families, and their relationships with their Korean families and homeland. Topics range from the personal-the role of food in their lives-to the communal the efforts of military wives to form support groups that enable them to affirm Korean identity that both American and Koreans would deny them. Relayed with warmth and compassion, this is the first in-depth study of Korean military brides, and is a groundbreaking contribution to Asian American, women''s, and "new" immigrant studies, while also providing a unique approach to military history.
Unpaid Annotation
"In general, the fluid writing style demonstrates Yuh''s background in journalsm, and helps explain why this work made its way from dissertation to hardcover so rapidly. It is a study that demands attention from scholars of foreign relations and migration between Korea and the United States, and deserves attention from ethnic studies scholars and immigration scholars as well."-Journal of American Ethnic History "Yuh has composed a complex, provocative, and compassionate portrayal of the experiences of Korean military brides from the 1950s through the 1990s. . . . Delving into how these women face isolation and aleination from both Korean and US societies because of their transnational status, Yuh''s masterful history demonstrates that these women have resisted perceptions of both societies and forged communities based on their claiming Korean and US identities as Korean military brides. A wonderful resource... Highly recommended." -Choice"Ji-Yeon Yuh''s book poignantly illustrates the human costs and benefits of militarized migration in the context of American-Korean relations." -The Journal of Asian Studies"Ji-Yeon Yuh uses a wealth of sources, especially moving oral histories, to tell an important, at times heartbreaking, story of Korean military brides. She takes us beyond the stereotypes and reveals their roles within their families, communities, and Korean immigration to the U.S. Without ignoring their difficult lives, Yuh portrays these women''s agency and dignity with skill and compassion." -K. Scott Wong, Williams College "Ji-Yeon Yuh''s study is to be commended on several counts, not the least of which is the "unique prism" (dust jacket) she gives the contemporary reader into the social and cultural contract between Korea and the United States, clearly a template that we would be advised to heed in these troubled times." - The Journal of American History "By studying the lives and history of Korean "military brides," Ji-Yeon Yuh pays tribute to an important group that has not received the understanding, attention, and respect that it deserves. Full of compelling stories, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns is sure to inspire new ways of thinking about U.S. and especially immigration history, as well as Asian American and Asian history." -Elaine Kim, University of California at Berkeley "Impeccably researched and seamlessly executed." -Bitch Magazine "IThis is one of the most compelling books I have read this year...Ji-Yeon Yuh''s account is alternately heart breaking and inspiring." - Comparative/World "Where do marriage, diaspora, racism and the politics of global alliances converge? In the dreams and dailiness of the thousands of Korean women living in the United States today. Ji-Yeon Yuh''s engaging and revealing book shows us that by listening attentively to the Korean women married to white and black American men, we can become a lot smarter about the realities of globalized living." -Cynthia Enloe, author of Maneuvers: the International Politics of Militarizing Women''s Lives "Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America, immigration historian Ji-Yeon Yuh explores how Korean women relate to American men in these cross-cultural relationships, and how the military link between the dominant U.S. and subservient Korea tends to complicate their marriages, already challenging for many other reasons, with a dose of international politics as well." -Korean Quarterly"Through compelling oral histories, she traces the lives of women form successive generations of brides." -Chronicle of Higher EducationSince the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research, Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns tells the stories of these women, from their presumed association with U.S. military camptowns and prostitution to their struggles within the intercultural families they create in the United States. Historian Ji-Yeon Yuh argues that military brides are a unique prism through which to view cultural and social contact between Korea and the U.S. After placing these women within the context of Korean-U.S. relations and the legacies of both Japanese and U.S. colonialism vis ? vis military prostitution, Yuh goes on to explore their lives, their coping strategies with their new families, and their relationships with their Korean families and homeland. Topics range from the personal-the role of food in their lives-to the communal the efforts of military wives to form support groups that enable them to affirm Korean identity that both American and Koreans would deny them. Relayed with warmth and compassion, this is the first in-depth study of Korean military brides, and is a groundbreaking contribution to Asian American, women''s, and "new" immigrant studies, while also providing a unique approach to military history.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Explanatory Notes
Chronology of Selected Events in Modern Korean History
Introductionp. 1
Camptown U.S.A.p. 9
American Feverp. 42
Immigrant Encounters: From Resistance to Survivalp. 84
Cooking American, Eating Koreanp. 126
Prodigal Daughters, Filial Daughtersp. 154
Sisters Do It For Themselves: Building Communityp. 188
Biographies of Women Interviewedp. 223
App. 1: A Note on Researchp. 231
Overview of Scholarly Treatment of Korean Military Bridesp. 233
Notesp. 237
Bibliographyp. 265
Indexp. 279
About the Authorp. 283
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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