Catalogue

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Race, space, and the law : unmapping a white settler society /
edited by Sherene H. Razack.
imprint
Toronto : Between the Lines, 2002.
description
ix, 310 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1896357598 :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Between the Lines, 2002.
isbn
1896357598 :
contents note
When place becomes race / Sherene H. Razack -- Rewriting histories of the land: Colonization and indigenous resistance in Easter Canada / Bonita Lawrence -- In Between and out of place: mixed-race identity, liquor and the law in British Columbia, 1850-1913 / Renisa Mawani -- Cartographies of violence: women memory and the subject(s) of the internment / Mona Oikawa -- Keeping the ivory tower white: discourses of racial domination / Carol Schick -- Gendered racial violence and spatialized justice: the murder of Pamela George / Sherene H Razack -- The unspeakability of racism : Mapping law's complicity in Manitoba's racialized spaces / Sheila Dawn Gill -- Making space for Mosques: struggles for urban citizenship in diasporic Toronto / Engin F. Isin and Myer Siemiatycki -- The space of Africville: creating regulating and remembering the urban slum / Jennifer J. Nelson -- Delivering subjects: race space and the emergence of legalized midwifery in Ontario / Sheryl Nestel
catalogue key
4691950
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Author Comments
"It is a similar process with race, although often not so obvious. If lots in a subdivision are large, only wealthy people can live there. If people of colour are under constant police surveillance on the streets or in malls, you will have more arrests and will contribute to the marking of their bodies as deviant bodies, and so on." Sherene Razack in conversation with Zoƫ Druick ZOE DRUICK : What is the significance of the term "unmapping" in the title of the book? SHERENE RAZACK : When colonisers first get to a place they intend to own, one of their first acts is to map it and give it names. Mapping enables them to feel in control and to know themselves as owners of the space. It is always about identity as well as a material act of possession. When you unmap, you ask questions about the claims and the identity-making process that have gone into making maps. You ask, for instance, about what the land was called before it was mapped. You unsettle notions that the land was simply theirs for the taking. To unmap is to consider that there is nothing innocent about mapping, that it is a process born of and consolidating certain power arrangements. ZD : Can you explain the phrase "space becomes race"? SR : It is probably more accurate to talk about how place becomes race. In the book I begin with an example from Canadian history. It was an offence under the Indian Act to be intoxicated on an Indian reserve. This law marked an Indian reserve as a special kind of place, one where the normal rules of society did not apply. Anyone in that space earned the mark of being somehow abnormal or different (and negatively so). Of course the people who are most likely to be on an Indian reserve are Aboriginal peoples. To have such a law is to mark as degenerate and lesser Indians. The place is thereby effectively collapsed with race. ZD : What role does law specifically play in producing space? SR : Law plays a very direct role in producing space. When you declare that land can only be used to build two-storey houses, or when you say that certain kinds of businesses cannot operate there, for instance, you absolutely shape the landscape and actively shape the social relations that will take place there. In my area of Toronto, houses had to be built in a Tudor or English style, a law that effectively shapes the cultural landscape of the area, marking it as the place for settlers of British origin. It is in this way that difference is spatially produced. We regulate what can happen in a space, who will feel good in it, who will profit from it, and we regulate social hierarchies. If all our buildings have no ramps, we are making a powerful statement about whether we think wheelchair bound people should have access, and, simultaneously, we are ensuring that they cannot in fact have access. It is a similar process with race, although often not so obvious. If lots in a subdivision are large, only wealthy people can live there. If people of colour are under constant police surveillance on the streets or in malls, you will have more arrests and will contribute to the marking of their bodies as deviant bodies, and so on. ZD : Is the book of interest to law and policy makers? SR : The book, as a critical work, will not be of interest to law and policy makers who are merely seeking a recipe for finding and rooting out racism in law. Instead, Race, Space, and the Law will be useful to those law and policy makers who wish to consider how racist conceptual tools and practices invade the very foundational categories of law. It will also build critical thinking on how our history has been and continues to be one of white dominance, and how we actively shape places to make this so. With this kind of awareness, we can begin to consider how to assess the racial impact of various laws and policies. ZD : What areas of research does the book contribute to? SR : This body of work clearly fits into what I would call critical race theory. It makes contributions to how we understand racial hierarchies. It fits readily into the sociology of law since it analyses how law produces and maintains hierarchical social relations. It also engages with the tools of critical geography and thus it fits into an ever expanding body of spatial theory. Finally, because it devotes considerable space to national myth
Main Description
Race, Space, and the Law belongs to a growing field of exploration that spans critical geography, sociology, law, education, and critical race and feminist studies. Writers who share this terrain reject the idea that spaces, and the arrangement of bodies in them, emerge naturally over time. Instead, they look at how spaces are created and the role of law in shaping and supporting them. They expose hierarchies that emerge from, and in turn produce, oppressive spatial categories. The authors' unmapping takes us through drinking establishments, parks, slums, classrooms, urban spaces of prostitution, parliaments, the main streets of cities, mosques, and the U.S.-Canada and U.S.-Mexico borders. Each example demonstrates that "place," as a Manitoba Court of Appeal judge concluded after analyzing a section of the Indian Act, "becomes race."
Main Description
Race, Space, and the Law belongs to a growing field of exploration that spans critical geography, sociology, law, education, and critical race and feminist studies. Writers who share this terrain reject the idea that spaces, and the arrangement of bodies in them, emerge naturally over time. Instead, they look at how spaces are created and the role of law in shaping and supporting them. They expose hierarchies that emerge from, and in turn produce, oppressive spatial categories.The authors' unmapping takes us through drinking establishments, parks, slums, classrooms, urban spaces of prostitution, parliaments, the main streets of cities, mosques, and the U.S.-Canada and U.S.-Mexico borders. Each example demonstrates that "place," as a Manitoba Court of Appeal judge concluded after analyzing a section of the Indian Act, "becomes race."
Main Description
Race, Space, and the Law reveals that the spaces we occupy are neither natural, nor neutral. This unsettling collection belongs to a growing field that spans critical geography, sociology, law, education, and critical race and feminist studies. The contributors reject the idea that spaces, and the arrangement of bodies in them, emerge naturally over time. Instead, they look at how spaces are created and the role of law in shaping and supporting them. They expose the racial hierarchies that emerge from, and in turn produce, various spatial arrangements. The authors' unmapping takes us through drinking establishments, parks, slums, classrooms, urban spaces of prostitution, parliaments, mosques, and the U.S.-Canada and U.S.-Mexico borders. Each example demonstrates that "place," as a Manitoba Court of Appeal judge concluded after analyzing a section of the Indian Act, "becomes race." Book jacket.
Unpaid Annotation
"Race, Space, and the Law reveals that the spaces we occupy are neither natural, nor neutral. This unsettling collection spans critical geography, sociology, law, education, and critical race and feminist studies. The contributors reject the idea that spaces, and the arrangement of bodies in them, emerge naturally over time. Instead, they look at how spaces are created and the role of law in shaping and supporting them. They expose the racial hierarchies that emerge from, and in turn produce, oppressive spatial arrangements. The authors' unmapping takes us through drinking establishments, parks, slums, classrooms, urban spaces of prostitution, parliaments, mosques, and the U.S.-Canada and U.S.-Mexico borders."
Table of Contents
Introduction: When Place Becomes Racep. 1
Rewriting Histories of the Land: Colonization and Indigenous Resistance in Eastern Canadap. 21
In Between and Out of Place: Mixed-Race Identity, Liquor, and the Law in British Columbia, 1850-1913p. 47
Cartographies of Violence: Women, Memory, and the Subject(s) of the "Internment"p. 71
Keeping the Ivory Tower White: Discourses of Racial Dominationp. 99
Gendered Racial Violence and Spatialized Justice: The Murder of Pamela Georgep. 121
The Unspeakability of Racism: Mapping Law's Complicity in Manitoba's Racialized Spacesp. 157
Making Space for Mosques: Struggles for Urban Citizenship in Diasporic Torontop. 185
The Space of Africville: Creating, Regulating, and Remembering the Urban "Slum"p. 211
Delivering Subjects: Race, Space, and the Emergence of Legalized Midwifery in Ontariop. 233
Notesp. 257
Bibliographyp. 294
Indexp. 297
Contributorsp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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