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The distributional aspects of social security and social security reform /
edited by Martin Feldstein and Jeffrey B. Liebman.
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2002.
description
x, 469 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0226241068 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2002.
isbn
0226241068 (cloth : alk. paper)
general note
"The papers in the present volume were presented at a conference in Woodstock, Vermont in October 1999"--pref.
catalogue key
4687732
 
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
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Social security is one of the largest and one of the most popular programs administered by the United States government. It is also under significant pressure to reform: given projected increases in both individual life expectancy and the sheer number of retirees, the current system faces the possibility of an eventual overload. Alternative proposals have emerged, ranging from reductions in future benefits to a rise in tax revenue to various forms of investment-based personal retirement accounts. As this volume suggests, the distributional consequences of these proposals are substantially different, and may disproportionately affect those groups who depend on social security to avoid poverty in old age. Together, these studies persuasively demonstrate that appropriately designed investment-based social-security reforms could effectively reduce the long-term burden of an aging society on future taxpayers, increase the expected future income of retirees, and mitigate poverty rates among the elderly.
Summaries
Main Description
Social security is the largest and perhaps the most popular program run by the federal government. Given the projected increase in both individual life expectancy and sheer number of retirees, however, the current system faces an eventual overload. Alternative proposals have emerged, ranging from reductions in future benefits to a rise in taxrevenue to various forms of investment-based personal retirement accounts. As this volume suggests, the distributional consequences of these proposals are substantially different and may disproportionately affect those groups who depend on social security to avoid poverty in old age. Together, these studies persuasively show that appropriately designed investment-based social security reforms can effectively reduce the long-term burden of an aging society on future taxpayers, increase the expected future income of retirees, and mitigate poverty rates among the elderly.
Table of Contents
Preface
Introduction
Redistribution in the Current U.S. Social Security System
Gauranteed Income: SSI and the Well-Being of the Elderly Poor
The Impact of Social Security and Other Factors on the Distribution of Wealth
Social Security and Inequality over the Life Cycle
Long-Run Effects of Social Security Reform Proposals on Lifetime Progressivity
Social Security's Treatment of Postwar Americans: How Bad Can It Get?
The Distributional Effects of an Investment-Based Social Security System
Distributional Effects in a General Equilibrium Analysis of Social Security
The Economics of Bequests in Pensions and Social Security
Differential Mortality and the Value of Individual Account Retirement Annuities
Appendix: Estimating Life Tables That Reflect Socioeconomic Differences in Mortality
Contributors
Author Index
Subject Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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