Catalogue


Legitimacy and power politics : the American and French Revolutions in international political culture /
Mlada Bukovansky
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2002.
description
viii, 255 p.
ISBN
0691074348 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2002.
isbn
0691074348 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4687695
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
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"Mlada Bukovansky has written a powerful study, arguing a bold and compelling theory with clarity and confidence."--Joyce Appleby, University of California, Los Angeles "Legitimacy and Power Politicsmakes an important and original set of arguments that speak directly to some of the most central debates in international relations theory."--Martha Finnemore, George Washington University
Flap Copy
"Mlada Bukovansky has written a powerful study, arguing a bold and compelling theory with clarity and confidence."-- Joyce Appleby, University of California, Los Angeles " Legitimacy and Power Politics makes an important and original set of arguments that speak directly to some of the most central debates in international relations theory."-- Martha Finnemore, George Washington University
Flap Copy
"Mlada Bukovansky has written a powerful study, arguing a bold and compelling theory with clarity and confidence."--Joyce Appleby, University of California, Los Angeles " Legitimacy and Power Politics makes an important and original set of arguments that speak directly to some of the most central debates in international relations theory."--Martha Finnemore, George Washington University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-04-01:
Bukovansky (Smith College) convincingly argues that ideas matter in international politics. They are the lenses through which actors view interests, opportunities, and challenges, and they shape strategic choices and perceptions of possibilities. Fundamental internal regime change in major actors can transform perceptions of international legitimacy, and, more broadly, can transform how international relations are conducted. This argument, that ideology and political culture shape but do not determine international politics should be obvious, but unfortunately it is not. After a long introduction about legitimacy transformation and the political-cultural dimensions of systemic change, she examines legitimacy in Enlightenment Europe's political culture, setting the parameters for analyzing the American and French Revolutions and their eventual impact on changing behavior and notions of legitimacy in international politics. These revolutions delegitimized monarchal regimes and their international relations, eventually replacing them with ideas of popular sovereignty and limited forms of democracy. This book is both subtle and at times repetitive. Even more analysis about how revolutionary ideology and culture shaped American and French approaches to international politics would be welcome. Hopefully a future book will analyze the Soviet attempt and failure to change the culture of international politics. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. P. Waligorski University of Arkansas
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Bukovansky convincingly argues that ideas matter in international politics."-- Choice
Bukovansky convincingly argues that ideas matter in international politics. -- Choice
"Bukovansky's volume is a most interesting analysis of the topic. . . . [I]t is a valuable addition to the bookshelves of those interested in the dynamics of politics (and who isn't?)."-- Lora Sigler, European Legacy
Legitimacy and Power Politicsmakes an important and original set of arguments that speak directly to some of the most central debates in international relations theory.
Mlada Bukovansky has written a powerful study, arguing a bold and compelling theory with clarity and confidence.
Bukovansky convincingly argues that ideas matter in international politics.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, April 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
This book examines the causes and consequences of a major transformation in both domestic and international politics: the shift from dynastically legitimated monarchical sovereignty to popularly legitimated national sovereignty. It analyzes the impact of Enlightenment discourse on politics in eighteenth-century Europe and the United States, showing how that discourse facilitated new authority struggles in Old Regime Europe, shaped the American and French Revolutions, and influenced the relationships between the revolutionary regimes and the international system. The interaction between traditional and democratic ideas of legitimacy transformed the international system by the early nineteenth century, when people began to take for granted the desirability of equality, individual rights, and restraint of power. Using an interpretive, historically sensitive approach to international relations, the author considers the complex interplay between elite discourses about political legitimacy and strategic power struggles within and among states. She shows how culture, power, and interests interacted to produce a crucial yet poorly understood case of international change. The book not only shows the limits of liberal and realist theories of international relations, but also demonstrates how aspects of these theories can be integrated with insights derived from a constructivist perspective that takes culture and legitimacy seriously. The author finds that cultural contests over the terms of political legitimacy constitute one of the central mechanisms by which the character of sovereignty is transformed in the international system--a conclusion as true today as it was in the eighteenth century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Bukovansky covers the causes and consequences of a major transformation in both domestic and international politics - the shift from dynastically-legitimated monarchical sovereignty to popularly-legitimated national sovereignty.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introduction: The Transformation of Legitimacyp. 1
Explaining the Transformation International Political Culture Plan of the Book
International Political Culture and Systemic Changep. 15
The Cultural Dimensions of International Politics Interplay between Culture and Strategy Methodology Conclusion
Old Regime Political Culturep. 61
International Relations: Strategic Overview The Political Culture of Old Regime Europe Cultural Complementarities: Enlightenment and Monarchy Cultural Contradictions in the Old European Order Conclusion
The American Revolutionp. 110
Republicanism Political Economy Cosmopolitanism versus Nationalism in American Foreign Policy Conclusion
The French Revolutionp. 165
The Collapse of the Ancien Reacute;gime Revolution and War Conclusion
Conclusion: Fractured Hegemony and the Seeds of Changep. 211
Legacies Political Culture and Systemic Change
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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