Catalogue


Women as sites of culture : women's roles in cultural formation from the Renaissance to the twentieth century /
edited by Susan Shifrin.
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2002.
description
xiv, 274 p. : ill., map, ports., plan ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0754603113
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Aldershot, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2002.
isbn
0754603113
catalogue key
4687496
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [257]-269) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Susan Shifrin is an art historian specializing in the field of early modern portraiture. She has worked as a curator and freelance collections manager at a number of museums and academic institutions, as well as teaching and writing in the fields of art history and women's studies. Shifrin is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Center for Visual Culture at Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, where she is preparing an exhibition for several area institutions that will open in 2004, titled 'Picturing Women: Historical Works and Contemporary Responses'
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
Exploring the ways in which women have formed and defined expressions of culture in a range of geographical, political, and historical settings, this collection of essays examines women's figurative and literal roles as sites of culture from the 16th century to the present day. Women as Sites of Culture represents a productive collaboration of historians from various disciplines in coherently addressing issues revolving around the roles of gender, text, and image in a range of cultures and periods.
Long Description
Exploring the ways in which women have formed and defined expressions of culture in a range of geographical, political, and historical settings, this collection of essays examines women's figurative and literal roles as sites of culture from the 16th century to the present day.The diversity of chronological, geographical and cultural subjects investigated by the contributors-from the 16th century to the 20th, from Renaissance Italy to Puritan Boston to the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth to post-war Japan, from parliamentary politics to the politics of representation-provides a range of historical outlooks. The collection brings an unusual variety of methodological approaches to the project of discovering intersections among women's studies, literary studies, cultural studies, history, and art history, and expands beyond the Anglo- and Eurocentric focus often found in other works in the field.The volume presents an in-depth, investigative study of a tightly-constructed set of crucial themes, including that of the female body as a governing trope in political and cultural discourses; the roles played by women and notions of womanhood in redefining traditions of ceremony, theatricality and spectacle; women's iconographies and personal spaces as resources that have shaped cultural transactions and evolutions; and finally, women's voices-speaking and writing, both-as authors of cultural record and destiny. Throughout the volume the themes are refracted chronologically, geographically, and disciplinarily as a means to deeper understanding of their content and contexts.Women as Sites of Culture represents a productive collaboration of historians from various disciplines in coherently addressing issues revolving around the roles of gender, text, and image in a range of cultures and periods.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. ix
List of Contributorsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
The Female Body As the Site of Polemics
The Rhetoric of Corporeality and the Political Subject: Containing the Dissenting Female Body in Civil War Englandp. 9
'As Strong as Any Man': Sojourner Truth's Tall Tale Embodimentp. 25
Flappers and Shawls: The Female Embodiment of Irish National Identity in the 1920sp. 37
'We are going to carve revenge on your back': Language, Culture, and the Female Body in Kingston's The Woman Warriorp. 51
'If this is improper, ...then I am all improper, and you must give me up': Daisy Miller and Other Uppity White Women as Resistant Emblems of Americap. 65
Staging the Sights of Culture, Staging Women: Theater, Ritual, and Ceremony
Bodies Political and Social: Royal Widows in Renaissance Ceremonialp. 79
Eroticizing Virtue: The Role of Cleopatra in Early Modern Dramap. 93
Applauding Shakespeare's Ophelia in the Eighteenth Century: Sexual Desire, Politics, and the Good Womanp. 105
Mother(s) of Invention: Prostitute-Actresses and Late Nineteenth-Century Bengali Theaterp. 125
'Art' for Men, 'Manners' for Women: How Women Transformed the Tea Ceremony in Modern Japanp. 139
Si(gh)ting the Woman as Cultural Resource
Portrait Medals of Vittoria Colonna: Representing the Learned Womanp. 153
Si(gh)ting the Mistress of the House: Anne Clifford and Architectural Spacep. 167
The 'Wild Woman' in the Culture of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealthp. 183
'At the end of the Walk by Madam Mazarines Lodgings': Si(gh)ting the Transgressive Woman in Accounts of the Restoration Courtp. 195
The Female Voice As the Site of Cultural Authority
'Why do you call me to teach the court?': Anne Hutchinson and the Making of Cultural Authorityp. 209
A Criticism of Contradiction: Anna Leticia Barbauld and the 'Problem' of Nineteenth-Century Women's Writingp. 221
Silent at the Wall: Women in Israeli Remembrance Day Ceremoniesp. 233
Revisiting a Site of Cultural Bondage: JoAnn Gibson Robinson's Boycott Memoirp. 245
Bibliographyp. 257
Indexp. 271
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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