Catalogue


İpek : imperial Ottoman silks and velvets /
written by Nurhan Atasoy ... [et al.] ; with contributions by Șerife Athıhan ... [et al.] ; compiled and edited by Julian Raby and Alison Effeny.
imprint
London : Azimuth Editions Limited on behalf of TEB İletișim ve Yayıncılıik A.Ș. : Distributed by Thames & Hudson Limited, c2001.
description
360 p. : ill. (some col.), map ; 37 cm.
ISBN
1898592195
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London : Azimuth Editions Limited on behalf of TEB İletișim ve Yayıncılıik A.Ș. : Distributed by Thames & Hudson Limited, c2001.
isbn
1898592195
catalogue key
4687098
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 353-357) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nurhan Atasoy, formerly Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Letters, Istanbul University, has been a distinguished lecturer, author and organizer of exhibitions on many aspects of the history of the arts in Turkey. Among her major projects was the organization of the international travelling exhibition The Anatolian Civilisations in 1983, and her publications include several on Ottoman miniature painting and Iznik. The Pottery of Ottoman Turkey (with Julian Raby). Walter Denny is Professor of Art History and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Massachusetts, and Honorary Curator of Carpets and Textiles at the Harvard University Art Museums. He is a prolific author on Islamic art, in particular the textiles and ceramics of Ottoman Turkey. Louise W. Mackie is Curator of Textiles and Islamic Art at the Cleveland Museum of Art and formerly held curatorial posts at the Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto and The Textile Museum, Washington, DC. She lectures and has published on many aspects of Islamic textiles. Hulya Tezcan is Curator of Textiles at the Topkapi Palace Museum in Istanbul, and Assistant Professor in the Master's programme at Yildiz Technical University in Istanbul. She has prepared various exhibitions on the textiles and clothing of the Topkapi Palace Museum, and has written widely on Ottoman textiles, leather and fur, including a catalogue in Arabic on the textile coverings for the Kaaba in Mecca.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-08-01:
It has taken Atasoy and colleagues ten years to produce this excellent study of Ottoman silks. This formidable group of international experts combined their research on all aspects of silk production made in the centuries following the founding of the Ottoman dynasty. Topics covered include the history, economy, and local and foreign cultures as well as all aspects of the demanding silk industry, trade, proposed dating of the actual textiles, and designs and layouts of patterns. A selected number of technical analyses, a glossary, and notes follow. The main centers of silk weaving were Bursa and Istanbul, whose products met the requirements of the imperial court for superb textiles. Textile production was a major factor in the economy; revenue from the finished products filled the coffers of the government. Splendid photography; but why do authors describe in exasperating detail the colors of many of the textiles when the photograph is in black and white? And, why not combine all of the "commentaries" in a single entry? That said, the publication is an important and welcome contribution to the history of the textile arts in the Islamic world. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals. C. Kane formerly, New York School of Interior Design
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-05-01:
In the court of the sultan, the clothes really did make the man; silk garments in particular indicated a person's station and power. Focusing on silk textiles produced at the height of the Ottoman Empire, the 16th and 17th centuries, this superbly organized book combines detailed scholarship with fantastic illustrations. The authors are all authorities in the fields of Turkish art, Islamic art, and textiles, and their expertise really shines. Chapters focus on the cultural and economic influence of silk textiles, styles, and weaves and include sections describing silk manufacturing from beginning to end. The true splendor of this book is the color photography of fabric and garments up to five centuries old. These pictures are an exquisite experience, quickly enveloping the viewer in the sense of opulence and royalty the textiles were meant to convey. While expensive, this book provides superior coverage of its topic. Highly recommended for larger public and academic libraries. Karen Ellis, Nicholson Memorial Lib. Syst., Garland, TX (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2002
Choice, August 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Status symbols, diplomatic gifts, artistic mediums and economic treasures--figured silk fabrics were among the most powerful and most characteristic artistic products of the Ottoman Empire. Wars were fought for control of silk revenues, and governments devoted major bureaucratic efforts toward the organization, regulation and taxation of silk production. Ipek: The Crescent & the Rose is the most comprehensive and magnificently illustrated overview of Ottoman silk textiles of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Its lavish, full-bleed, six-color reproductions of fabrics from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and from lesser-known ecclesiastical treasuries in the Balkans, Sweden, Poland and Russia, demonstrate the creativity of Ottoman weavers in rich detail, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in design or a general appreciation for visual delights. Accompanied by scholarly essays that shed light on the different historical, legislative, economic and technological factors that determined the history of these textiles.
Long Description
Status symbols, diplomatic gifts, artistic mediums and economic treasures--figured silk fabrics were among the most powerful and most characteristic artistic products of the Ottoman Empire. Wars were fought for control of silk revenues, and governments devoted major bureaucratic efforts toward the organization, regulation and taxation of silk production. Ipek: The Crescent & the Roseis the most comprehensive and magnificently illustrated overview of Ottoman silk textiles of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Its lavish, full-bleed, six-color reproductions of fabrics from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and from lesser-known ecclesiastical treasuries in the Balkans, Sweden, Poland and Russia, demonstrate the creativity of Ottoman weavers in rich detail, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in design or a general appreciation for visual delights. Accompanied by scholarly essays that shed light on the different historical, legislative, economic and technological factors that determined the history of these textiles.
Unpaid Annotation
Status symbols, diplomatic gifts, artistic mediums, and economic treasures -- figured silk fabrics were among the most powerful and most characteristic artistic products of the Ottoman Empire. Wars were fought for control of silk revenues and governments devoted major bureaucratic efforts toward the organization, regulation, and taxation of silk production. Ipek: The Crescent & the Rose is the most comprehensive and magnificently illustrated overview of Ottoman silk textiles of the 16th and 17th centuries. Its lavish, full-bleed, six-color reproductions of fabrics from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul, and from lesser-known ecclesiastical treasuries in the Balkans, Sweden, Poland, and Russia demonstrate the creativity of Ottoman weavers in rich detail, and will appeal to anyone with an interest in design or a general appreciation for visual delights. Accompanied by scholarly essays that shed light on the different historical, legislative, economic, and technological factors that determined the history of these textiles.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. 9
Authors' acknowledgementsp. 10
Publisher's notep. 11
Mapp. 12
Chronology of the Ottoman dynastyp. 13
Introductionp. 15
The historical and cultural background
Textiles and ceremonies at the Ottoman courtp. 21
Colour Platesp. 36
The Ottoman silk industry
A chronological overviewp. 155
The silk industry in Bursap. 159
The silk industry in Istanbulp. 165
Other centresp. 172
Trade
Ottoman silks in the Balkans, Poland and Russiap. 176
Italian silks for the Ottoman marketp. 182
Silk textile manufacturing
The basics of silk manufacturingp. 191
The design of patterned silksp. 203
Production efficienciesp. 211
The three favoured weavesp. 217
Dating Ottoman silk textiles
Methodologiesp. 226
Catalogue of dateable Ottoman silk textilesp. 240
The question of the Topkapi Palace labelsp. 253
Designs and layoutsp. 255
Technical analyses of selected textilesp. 322
Glossaryp. 341
Notesp. 343
Bibliographyp. 353
Indexp. 358
Photographic creditsp. 360
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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