Catalogue

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Selected letters of John Keats /
edited by Grant F. Scott.
edition
Rev. ed.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2002.
description
xlv, 526 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
0674007492 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2002.
isbn
0674007492 (alk. paper)
general note
"Based on the texts of Hyder Edward Rollins."
Rev. ed. of: The letters of John Keats, 1814-1821. 1958.
catalogue key
4685738
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-05-01:
If letter writing is a performance art, and great performances seduce, then surely readers will be seduced by the letters of John Keats. The examples included here are those selected by Hyder E. Rollins for The Letters of John Keats, 1814-1821, but Scott (English, Muhlenberg Coll.) has deleted the endless academic annotations and updated the spelling and punctuation for ease of reading. As a result, the letters glow with spontaneity; sprightly and personal to the point of intimacy, they reveal a mind and heart searching high and low for possibilities. Here, readers will see a man in step with daily existence who reasoned his way through but also exalted in life's infinite variety and challenges. Insights into Keats's poetry are to be found, too, as well as his great devotion to friends and family. Keats was not without human frailties he could be dicey, contradictory, and manipulative but his letters are irresistible. Included in this volume are letters to a cross section of people, including Keats's friends, siblings, and fiance, Fanny Brawne. Scott wisely includes a few letters to and about John Keats, the most notable being those of the painter Joseph Severn, his loving caregiver, who nursed Keats until his early death in Italy. Recommended for larger public libraries. Robert L. Kelly, Fort Wayne Community Schs., IN (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Choice on 2003-01-01:
In 1958 Harvard University Press published what is still considered one of the best selections of Keats's letters: The Letters of John Keats, 1814-1821, ed. by Hyder Edward Rollins. Scott (Muhlenberg College) took certain liberties in this revision of Rollins's original two-volume work. He omits, for example, much of the detailed apparatus found in its forerunner, but supports his editorial principles in an informative introduction. In addition to correcting a number of Rollins's minor errors having to do with names and dates, he reduces many annotations and modernizes punctuation and spelling. Going beyond Rollins, he includes rediscovered letters, and unlike other editions of Keats's letters, Scott's volume includes pertinent letters sent to Keats. The editor's stated purpose was to produce a single volume that would "recreate some of the spontaneity with which ... the original letters were written"--to present a readable selection that would appeal to a wider, general audience. Textual scholars may still prefer Rollins's edition, but less-experienced readers and devotees of Keats's poetry will appreciate Scott's revision. Interesting to read, Keats's letters throw a great deal of light on his life and poetry, revealing the insecurities, doubts, fears, enthusiasms, and creativity of one of England's greatest poets. All collections, but particularly those serving lower- and upper-division undergraduates. G. A. Cevasco St. John's University (NY)
Reviews
Review Quotes
Devotees of Keats's poetry will appreciate Scott's revision. Interesting to read, Keats's letters throw a great deal of light on his life and poetry, revealing the insecurities, doubts, fears, enthusiasms, and creativity of one of England's greatest poets.
Editor Scott has selected the most important correspondence from the standard two-volume Selected Letters of John Keats published in 1958, for this new version, and added four additional items (three previously unpublished). The informative editorial material is expertly presented.
Keats's letters have long been regarded as masterpieces, both for the light they shed on the poetry, and for the vivid picture they provide of the poet. This excellent selection is based on Hyder Rollins's definitive 1958 edition, and includes several letters which have been found only recently. The context of the correspondence is established by the inclusion of some letters addressed to Keats.
[These] letters glow with spontaneity; sprightly and personal to the point of intimacy, they reveal a mind and heart searching high and low for possibilities. Here, readers will see a man in step with daily existence who reasoned his way through but also exalted in life's infinite variety and challenges. Insights into Keats's poetry are to be found, too, as well as his great devotion to friends and family. Keats was not without human frailties--he could be dicey, contradictory, and manipulative--but his letters are irresistible...Recommended.
This new book, which offers the traditional body of Keats's letters as well as a handful of new additions, reminds us of the extraordinary human being who was John Keats. Here he is--falling in love, struggling with questions of literature and philosophy, generously helping others at every chance, bravely facing a terminal disease...Harvard University Press has produced a definitive volume in this new edition about the poet "whose name was writ on water."
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, May 2002
ForeWord Magazine, July 2002
Choice, January 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This edition, which features four rediscovered letters, three of which are being published here for the first time, affords readers the pleasure of the poet's 'trifles' as well as the surprise of his most famous ideas emerging unpredictably.
Main Description
The letters of John Keats are, T. S. Eliot remarked, "what letters ought to be; the fine things come in unexpectedly, neither introduced nor shown out, but between trifle and trifle." This new edition, which features four rediscovered letters, three of which are being published here for the first time, affords readers the pleasure of the poet's "trifles" as well as the surprise of his most famous ideas emerging unpredictably. Unlike other editions, this selection includes letters to Keats and among his friends, lending greater perspective to an epistolary portrait of the poet. It also offers a revealing look at his "posthumous existence," the period of Keats's illness in Italy, painstakingly recorded in a series of moving letters by Keats's deathbed companion, Joseph Severn. Other letters by Dr. James Clark, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Richard Woodhouse--omitted from other selections of Keats's letters--offer valuable additional testimony concerning Keats the man. Edited for greater readability, with annotations reduced and punctuation and spelling judiciously modernized, this selection recreates the spontaneity with which these letters were originally written.
Publisher Fact Sheet
The letters of John Keats are, T. S. Eliot remarked, "what letters ought to be; the fine things come in unexpectedly, neither introduced nor shown out, but between trifle and trifle." This new edition, which features four rediscovered letters, affords readers the pleasure of the poet's "trifles," as well as the surprise of his most famous ideas emerging unpredictably.
Unpaid Annotation
The letters of John Keats are, T. S. Eliot remarked, "what letters ought to be; the fine things come in unexpectedly, neither introduced nor shown out, but between trifle and trifle." This new edition, which features four rediscovered letters, affords readers the pleasure of the poet's "trifles" as well as the surprise of his most famous ideas emerging unpredictably.
Table of Contents
Preface
Editorial Procedures
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Events in the Life of John Keats Keats''s Correspondents
Letters, 1816-1821 1816-1817 C. C. Clarke
September C. C. Clarke
9 October C. C. Clarke
31 October B. R. Haydon
20 November C. C. Clarke
17 December J. H. Reynolds
17 March George And Tom Keats
15 April J. H. Reynolds
17, 18 April Leigh Hunt
10 May B. R. Haydon
10, 11 May Taylor and Hessey
16 May Taylor and Hessey
10 June Jane and Mariane Reynolds
4 September J. H. Reynolds
September Fanny Keats
10 September J. H. Reynolds
21 September B. R. Haydon
28 September Benjamin Bailey
8 October Benjamin Bailey
28-30 October Benjamin Bailey
3 November Benjamin Bailey
22 November J. H. Reynolds
22 November George and Tom Keats
21, 27 (?) December 1818 George and Tom Keats
5 January B. R. Haydon
10 January George and Tom Keats
23 January B. R. Haydon
23 January John Taylor
23 January Benjamin Bailey
23 January George and Tom Keats
23, 24 January George and Tom Keats
30 January John Taylor
30 January J. H. Reynolds
3 February George and Tom Keats
14 (?) February J. H. Reynolds
19 February George and Tom Keats
21 February John Taylor
27 February Benjamin Bailey
13 March J. H. Reynolds
14 March James Rice
24 March J. H. Reynolds
25 March B. R. Haydon
8 April J. H. Reynolds
9 April J. H. Reynolds
17 April John Taylor
24 April J. H. Reynolds
27 April J. H. Reynolds
3 May Benjamin Bailey
21, 25 April Benjamin Bailey
10 June Tom Keats
25-27 June George and Georgiana Keats
27, 28 June Tom Keats-29 June, 1, 2 July Fanny Keats
2, 3, 5 July Tom Keats
3, 5, 7, 9 July J. H. Reynolds
11, 13 July Tom Keats
10, 11, 13, 14 July Tom Keats
17, 18, 20, 21 July Benjamin Bailey
18, 22 July Tom Keats
23, 26 July Tom Keats
3, 6 August Mrs. James Wylie
6 August Fanny Keats
19 August C. W. Dilke
20, 21 September J. H. Reynolds
22 (?) September J. A. Hessey
8 October Fanny Keats
26 October Richard Woodhouse
27 October George and Georgiana Keats
14, 16, 21, 24, 31 October James Rice
24 November B. R. Haydon
22-December 1819 George and Georgiana Keats
16-18, 22, 29 (?), 31 December 1818, 2-4 January 1819 B. R. Haydon
10 (?) January Fanny Keats
11 February B. R. Haydon
18 (?) February Fanny Keats
27 February B. R. Haydon
8 March Fanny Keats
13 March Joseph Severn
29 March Fanny Keats
31 March Fanny Keats
12 April B. R. Haydon
13 April Fanny Keats
1 May (?) George and Georgiana Keats
14, 19 February, 3 (?), 12, 13, 17, 19 March, 15, 16, 21, 30 April, 3, 4 May Miss Jeffery
31 May Miss Jeffery
9 June Fanny Keats
9 June B. R. Haydon
17 June Fanny Keats
17 June Fanny Brawne
1 July Fanny Keats
6 July Fanny Brawne
8 July J. H. Reynolds
11 July Fanny Brawne
15 (?) July Fanny Brawne
25 July C. W. Dilke (With Charles Brown)
31 July Fanny Brawne
5, 6 August Benjamin Bailey
14 August Fanny Brawne
16 August John Taylor
31 August J. A. Hessey
5 September John Taylor
5 September Fanny Brawne
13 September John Taylor (From Richard Woodhouse)
19, 20 September J. H. Reynolds
21 September Richard Woodhouse
21, 22 September Charles Brown
22 September C. W. Dilke
22 September Charles Brown
23 September George And Georgiana Keats
17, 18, 20, 21, 24, 25, 27 September C. W. Dilke
1 October B. R. Haydon (With Charles Brown)
3 October Fanny Brawne
11 October Fanny Brawne
13 October Fanny Brawne
19 October Fanny Keats
26 (?) October William Haslam
2 November Joseph Severn
15 November John Taylor
17 November James Rice
December Fanny Keats
20 December 1820 Georgiana Wylie Keats
13, 15, 17, 28 January Fanny Brawne
4 (?) February Fanny Keats
6 February Fanny Keats
8 February Fanny Brawne
10 (?) February Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Keats
14 February Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Brawne
February (?) James Rice
14, 16 February Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Brawne
February (?) Fanny Brawne
24 (?) February Fanny Brawne
27 (?) February J. H. Reynolds
28 February Fanny Brawne
28 (?) February Fanny Brawne
29 (?) February Fanny Brawne
1 March (?) C. W. Dilke
4 March Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Keats
20 March Fanny Brawne
March (?) Fanny Brawne
March (?) Mrs. James Wylie
24 (?) March Fanny Keats
1 April Fanny Keats
12 April Fanny Keats
21 April Fanny Keats
4 May Fanny Brawne
May (?) Fanny Brawne
June (?) John Taylor
2 (?) June Charles Brown
About 21 June Fanny Keats
23 June Fanny Brawne
4 July (?) Fanny Brawne
5 July (?) Fanny Keats
5 July William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
12 (?) July Fanny Keats
22 July John Keats (From Percy Bysshe Shelley)
27 July Fanny Brawne
August (?) Fanny Keats
13 August John Taylor
13 August Leigh Hunt
13 (?) August John Taylor
14 August Charles Brown
14 August Percy Bysshe Shelley
16 August Charles Brown
August (?) Fanny Keats
23 August Fanny Keats
11 September William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
19 September William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
21 September Charles Brown
30 September William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
22 October Mrs. Samuel Brawne
24 (?) October Charles Brown
1, 2 November William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
1, 2 November ? (From Dr. James Clark)
27 November Charles Brown
30 November Charles Brown (From Joseph Severn)
14, 17 December John Taylor (From Joseph Severn)
24 December 1821 ? (From Dr. James Clark)
3 January Mrs. Samuel Brawne (From Joseph Severn)
11 January William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
15 January John Taylor (From Joseph Severn)
25, 26 January William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
22 February John Taylor (From Joseph Severn)
6 March William Haslam (From Charles Brown)
18 March William Haslam (From Joseph Severn)
5 May
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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