Catalogue


Mishnah and the social formation of the early Rabbinic Guild : a socio-rhetorical approach /
Jack N. Lightstone ; with an appendix by Vernon K. Robbins.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion = Corporation canadienne des sciences religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2002.
description
xi, 234 p.
ISBN
088920375X :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Published for the Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion = Corporation canadienne des sciences religieuses by Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2002.
isbn
088920375X :
catalogue key
4681910
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [217]-229) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jack N. Lightstone has been on the faculty of Concordia University in Montreal since 1976, where he currently holds the post of Provost and Vice-Rector, Research
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
A socio-rhetorical analysis of Mishnah, the first document authored by the early rabbinic movement and its principal object of study for several centuries
Main Description
Where do the origins of the rabbinic movement lie, and how might evidence from the early rabbinic literature be made to reveal those origins? In order to shed light on the early social formation of the rabbinic guild of masters, Lightstone brings the theoretical and methodological insights of socio-rhetorical analysis to examine Mishnah, the first document authored by the early rabbinic movement and its principal object of study for several centuries. He argues that the enshrinement of Mishnah served to model, via its pervasive rhetoric, the principal authoritative guild expertise that qualified and marked one as a member of the rabbinic guild. Furthermore, he establishes the social and historical venue in late second- and early third-century Galilee.
Unpaid Annotation
The author brings the theoretical and methodological insights of socio-rhetorical analysis to examine Mishnah, the first document authored by the early rabbinic movement and its principal object of study for several centuries.
Main Description
Where do the origins of the rabbinic movement lie, and how might evidence from the early rabbinic literature be made to reveal those origins? In order to shed light on the early social formation of the rabbinic guild of masters, Lightstone brings the theoretical and methodological insights of socio-rhetorical analysis to examine Mishnah, the first document authored by the early rabbinic movement and its principal object of study for several centuries. He argues that the enshrinement of Mishnah served to model, via its pervasive rhetoric, the principal authoritative guild expertise that qualified and marked one as a member of the rabbinic guild. Furthermore, he establishes the social and historical venue in late second- and early third-century Galilee. The author concludes that the social formation of the early rabbinic guild coalesced around the institution of the Jewish Patriarchy, for which the early rabbis served as bureaucratic-scribal retainers. He further suggests that the development of both the Patriarchy in the Land of Israel and the social formation of the rabbinic guild may have been spurred by the imposition of Roman-style urbanization in the region over the course of the latter half of the second and beginning of the third century. Lightstone's approach is informed by the insights and methods of several cognate disciplines, encompassing literary analysis, sociology and anthropology, and history (including, in the last chapter, the history of material culture). The book will be of interest to advanced students in the history of Judaism, rabbinic literature, biblical studies, early Christianity, and the history of religion and culture in the late Roman Near East.
Long Description
Where do the origins of the rabbinic movement lie, and how mightevidence from the early rabbinic literature be made to revealthose origins?In order to shed light on the early social formation of therabbinic guild of masters, Lightstone brings the theoretical andmethodological insights of socio-rhetorical analysis to examineMishnah, the first document authored by the early rabbinicmovement and its principal object of study for several centuries.He argues that the enshrinement of Mishnah served to model, viaits pervasive rhetoric, the principal authoritative guildexpertise that qualified and marked one as a member of therabbinic guild. Furthermore, he establishes the social andhistorical venue in late second- and early third-century Galilee.The author concludes that the social formation of the earlyrabbinic guild coalesced around the institution of the JewishPatriarchy, for which the early rabbis served as bureaucratic-scribal retainers. He further suggests that the development ofboth the Patriarchy in the Land of Israel and the social formationof the rabbinic guild may have been spurred by the imposition ofRoman-style urbanization in the region over the course of thelatter half of the second and beginning of the third century.Lightstone's approach is informed by the insights and methods ofseveral cognate disciplines, encompassing literary analysis,sociology and anthropology, and history (including, in the lastchapter, the history of material culture). The book will be ofinterest to advanced students in the history of Judaism, rabbinicliterature, biblical studies, early Christianity, and the historyof religion and culture in the late Roman Near East.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Focusing on the Social Meaning of Mishnaic Rhetoricp. 1
Mishnaic Rhetoricp. 33
Tosefta's (Dis)simulation of Mishnah's Rhetoricp. 79
Semahot's Remaking of Mishnah's Rhetoricp. 121
Summary and Conclusions: Rhetoric and Role-Mishnah, Material Evidence and the Emergence of the Rabbinic Guild in Late-Second-Century Galileep. 177
A Comparison of Mishnah Gittin 1:1-2:2 and James 2:1-13 from the Perspective of Greco-Roman Rhetorical Elaboration,p. 201
References and Selected Bibliographyp. 217
General Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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