Catalogue


The hidden Isaac Bashevis Singer /
edited by Seth L. Wolitz.
imprint
Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2001.
description
xxvii, 240 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
029279147X (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Austin, TX : University of Texas Press, 2001.
isbn
029279147X (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4681656
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Seth L. Wolitz holds the L. D., Marie, and Edwin Gale Chair of Judaic Studies at the University of Texas at Austin, where he is also Professor of French, Slavic, and Comparative Literature. He helped to develop the field of Jewish studies, particularly the study of the secular Yiddish literary cultural world of Eastern Europe and North America. He has also pioneered studies in Eastern European Jewish art history and cultural studies. Trained as a Romance scholar and comparatist at the University of Chicago and Yale University, he has published on Provencal and Brazilian poetry, German theater, and French twentieth-century literature. He is also one of the founders of francophonic African literary studies in the United States and has taught opera and written libretti for operas
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-01-01:
The motive of this collection is admirable: finding and exploring the connections between modern Jewish spirituality and the writings of Nobel prize winner Singer. A master storyteller, the deft and fascinating Singer has always been burdened by literal-minded critics and expositors who fail to see his dark comedy. So it is here with Wolitz (comparative literature, Univ. of Texas, Austin). Still, it is good to be stimulated to think again about Singer's work. For collections where there is a strong Jewish readership. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
I can't think of another anthology, nor of any individual study of Singer, that sets out so rich and varied a sense of his work in its contexts.
This item was reviewed in:
Library Journal, January 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
Nobel Prize-winning author Isaac Bashevis Singer stands virtually alone among prominent writers for being more widely known through translations of his work than through the original texts. Yet readers and critics of the Yiddish originals have long pointed out that the English versions are generally shortened, often shorn of much description and religious matter, and their perspectives and denouements are significantly altered. In short, they turn the Yiddish author into a Jewish-American English writer, detached from of his Eastern European Jewish literary and cultural roots.By contrast, this collection of essays by leading Yiddish scholars seeks to recover the authentic voice and vision of the writer known to his Yiddish readers as Yitskhok Bashevis. The essays are grouped around four themes:The Yiddish language and the Yiddish cultural experience in Bashevis's writingsThematic approaches to the study of Bashevis's literatureBashevis's interface with other times and culturesInterpretations of Bashevis's autobiographical writingsA special feature of this volume is the inclusion of Joseph Sherman's new, faithful translation of a chapter from Bashevis's Yiddish "underworld" novel Yarme and Keyle.
Publisher Fact Sheet
This collection of essays grouped around four themes by leading Yiddish scholars seeks to recover the authentic voice & vision of the writer known to his readers as Yitskhol Bashevis. The authors seek to reattach the writer to his Eastern European Jewish literary & cultural roots through their essays.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This collection of essays by Yiddish scholars seeks to recover the authentic voice and vision of the writer known to his Yiddish readers as Yitskhok Bashevis.
Main Description
"I can't think of another anthology, nor of any individual study of Singer, that sets out so rich and varied a sense of his work in its contexts."--Lawrence Rosenwald, Anne Pierce Rogers Professor of American Literature, Wellesley CollegeNobel Prize-winning author Isaac Bashevis Singer stands virtually alone among prominent writers for being more widely known through translations of his work than through the original texts. Yet readers and critics of the Yiddish originals have long pointed out that the English versions are generally shortened, often shorn of much description and religious matter, and their perspectives and denouements are significantly altered. In short, they turn the Yiddish author into a Jewish-American English writer, detached from of his Eastern European Jewish literary and cultural roots.By contrast, this collection of essays by leading Yiddish scholars seeks to recover the authentic voice and vision of the writer known to his Yiddish readers as Yitskhok Bashevis. The essays are grouped around four themes: The Yiddish language and the Yiddish cultural experience in Bashevis' writings Thematic approaches to the study of Bashevis' literature Bashevis' interface with other times and cultures Interpretations of Bashevis' autobiographical writingsA special feature of this volume is the inclusion of Joseph Sherman' new, faithful translation of a chapter from Bashevis' Yiddish "underworld" novel Yarme and Keyle.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xiii
The Yiddish Language and the Yiddish Cultural Experience in Bashevis's Writings
A Canticle for Isaac: A Kaddish for Bashevisp. 3
Bashevis/Singer and the Jewish Popep. 13
History, Messianism, and Apocalyse in Bashevis's Workp. 28
Sociolinguistic Views of Isaac Bashevis Singerp. 62
Thematic Approaches to the Study of Bashevis's Fiction
Bilom in Bashevis's Der knekht (The Slave): A khaye hot oykh a neshome (An animal also has a soul)p. 79
Art and Religion in Der bal-tshuve (The Penitent)p. 93
"Death Is the Only Messiah": Three Supernatural Stories by Yitskhok Bashevisp. 107
Bashevis's Interface with Other Times and Cultures
Bashevis's Interactions with the Mayse-bukh (Book of Tales)p. 119
The Role of Polish Language and Literature in Bashevis's Fictionp. 134
Interpretations of Bashevis's Autobiographical Writings
Revealing Bashevis's Earliest Autobiographical Novel, Varshe 1914-1918 (Warsaw 1914-1918)p. 151
Folk and Folklore in the Work of Bashevisp. 162
Bashevis at Forvertsp. 173
Bashevis's Untranslated "Gangster" Novel: Yarme Un Keyle
A Background Note on the Translation of Yarme un keylep. 185
Yarme and Keyle: Chapter 2p. 192
Bashevis Singer as a Regionalist of Lublin Province: A Notep. 219
Glossaryp. 225
Notes on Contributorsp. 227
Indexp. 231
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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