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Money and security : troops, monetary policy and West Germany's relations with the United States and Britain, 1950-1971 /
Hubert Zimmermann.
imprint
Washington, D.C. : German Historical Institute ; Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
description
xvi, 275 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
052178204X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Washington, D.C. : German Historical Institute ; Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
isbn
052178204X
catalogue key
4680203
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 255-267) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'... a fine study of a complex monetary issue ... Zimmerman offers especially interesting insights into West German foreign economic policy-making ...' The Journal of the German History Society
"As Zimmermann successfully links the history of the cold war to that of the story of international monetary policy, and takes an admirable multinational approach, his work should interest anyone eager to understand how the West has tried to master the burdens of collective defence." The International History Review
'Based on a large number of recently released sources Zimmermann presents a compelling study of the role of economic diplomacy in Anglo-German and German-American relations.' Journal of Diplomacy and Statecraft
Review of the hardback: '... a fine study of a complex monetary issue ... Zimmerman offers especially interesting insights into West German foreign economic policy-making ...' The Journal of the German History Society
Review of the hardback: 'Based on a large number of recently released sources Zimmermann presents a compelling study of the role of economic diplomacy in Anglo-German and German-American relations.' Journal of Diplomacy and Statecraft
Review of the hardback: 'This is a fine study of a complex monetary issue ... Zimmerman offers especially interesting insights into West German foreign economic policy-making ...' German History
"This book presents an entirely different perspective on familiar events and is well worth reading." Military Review
'This is a fine study of a complex monetary issue ... Zimmerman offers especially interesting insights into West German foreign economic policy-making ...' German History
"...Zimmermann has provided an excellent model for historians and policy analysts." Anni P. Baker, Wheaton College, Norton, Massachusetts, Canadian Journal of History
"Zimmermann's thorough research and cogent analysis of American, British, and German monetary issues... is a scholarly contribution to the historiography of the Cold War." The Journal of Military History
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study focuses primarily on the problem of deciding, or negotiating how the enormous costs of maintaining British and American troops in Germany were financed during the Cold War period.
Description for Bookstore
Links two fundamental political structures of the Cold War era; the transatlantic security system and the international monetary system. Both Washington and London identified the cost of British and American troops in Germany as a major reason for the decline of their currencies, whereas Germany reluctantly traded 'Money for Security.'
Description for Bookstore
This 2002 study links two fundamental political structures of the Cold War era; the transatlantic security system and the international monetary system. Both Washington and London identified the cost of British and American troops in Germany as a major reason for the decline of their currencies, whereas Germany reluctantly traded 'Money for Security.'
Main Description
This 2002 study links two fundamental political structures of the Cold War era, the transatlantic security system and the international monetary system. Central to this issue is a problem which soured relations between the Federal Republic and its allies from the 1950s to the 1970s: who was to bear the enormous cost of British and American troops in Germany? Both Washington and London identified this cost as a major reason for the decline of their currencies, whereas Germany reluctantly paid and traded 'Money for Security'; a fundamental pattern of its postwar foreign policy. The interweaving of money and security leads toward a more complete understanding of transatlantic history during the Cold War, one which provides an incisive comment on the pattern of simultaneous conflict and cooperation in the interaction of modern states, demonstrates the influence of domestic politics on foreign policies, and comments on the relative nature of American hegemony.
Main Description
This study links two fundamental political structures of the Cold War era, the transatlantic security system and the international monetary system. Central to this issue is a problem that soured relations among the Federal Republic and its major allies from the 1950s to the 1970s: Who was to bear the enormous cost of British and American troops in Germany? Both Washington and London identified this cost as a major reason for the decline of the pound and the dollar, whereas Germany reluctantly paid and traded "Money for Security", a fundamental pattern of its postwar foreign policy.
Main Description
This study links two fundamental political structures of the Cold War era, the transatlantic security system and the international monetary system. Central to this issue is a problem which soured relations between the Federal Republic and its major allies from the 1950s to the 1970s: who was to bear the enormous cost of British and American troops in Germany? Both Washington and London identified this cost as a major reason for the decline of the pound and the dollar, whereas Germany reluctantly paid and traded 'Money for Security', a fundamental pattern of its postwar foreign policy. The interweaving of money and security leads toward a new and more complete understanding of transatlantic history during the Cold War, one which provides an incisive comment on the pattern of simultaneous conflict and cooperation in the interaction of modern states, demonstrates the crucial importance of domestic politics for the formulation of foreign policies, and comments on the relative nature of American hegemony.
Table of Contents
Introduction
On whose shoulders? German rearmament and the Cold War burden
The British `new look' and Anglo-German relations
Adenauer and `perfidious Albion': troop reductions, support costs, and the integration of Europe, 1957-1959
The Radford plan: America and its troops in Germany, 1955-1958
The political economy of US troop stationing in Europe
Offset and monetary policy during the Kennedy administration, 1961-1962
The bargain slowly unravels: offset, troop reductions, and the balance of payments, 1962-1965
The culmination of the burden-sharing conflict: Chancellor Ehrard's visit to Washington in September 1966
The trilateral negotiations of 1966-1967
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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