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The transformation of the Southeastern Indians, 1540-1760 /
essays by Marvin T. Smith ... [et al.] ;edited by Robbie Ethridge and Charles Hudson.
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2002.
description
xxxix, 369 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
1578063515
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2002.
isbn
1578063515
general note
"Papers presented at the Porter L. Fortune History Symposium at the University of Mississippi in 1998"--Pref.
catalogue key
4673429
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The most current thought on Native Americans of the colonial South
Summaries
Main Description
With essays by Stephen Davis, Penelope Drooker, Patricia K. Galloway, Steven Hahn, Charles Hudson, Marvin Jeter, Paul Kelton, Timothy Pertulla, Christopher Rodning, Helen Rountree, Marvin T. Smith, and John Worth The first two-hundred years of Western civilization in the Americas was a time when fundamental and sometimes catastrophic changes occurred in Native American communities in the South. In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists provide perspectives on how this era shaped American Indian society for later generations and how it even affects these communities today. This collection of essays presents the most current scholarship on the social history of the South, identifying and examining the historical forces, trends, and events that were attendant to the formation of the Indians of the colonial South. The essayists discuss how Southeastern Indian culture and society evolved. They focus on such aspects as the introduction of European diseases to the New World, long-distance migration and relocation, the influences of the Spanish mission system, the effects of the English plantation system, the northern fur trade of the English, and the French, Dutch, and English trade of Indian slaves and deerskins in the South. This book covers the full geographic and social scope of the Southeast, including the indigenous peoples of Florida, Virginia, Maryland, the Appalachian Mountains, the Carolina Piedmont, the Ohio Valley, and the Central and Lower Mississippi Valleys. Robbie Ethridge is an assistant professor of anthropology and southern studies at the University of Mississippi. Charles Hudson is Franklin Professor of Anthropology and History at the University of Georgia.
Main Description
With essays by Stephen Davis, Penelope Drooker, Patricia K. Galloway, Steven Hahn, Charles Hudson, Marvin Jeter, Paul Kelton, Timothy Pertulla, Christopher Rodning, Helen Rountree, Marvin T. Smith, and John WorthThe first two-hundred years of Western civilization in the Americas was a time when fundamental and sometimes catastrophic changes occurred in Native American communities in the South.InThe Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists provide perspectives on how this era shaped American Indian society for later generations and how it even affects these communities today.This collection of essays presents the most current scholarship on the social history of the South, identifying and examining the historical forces, trends, and events that were attendant to the formation of the Indians of the colonial South.The essayists discuss how Southeastern Indian culture and society evolved. They focus on such aspects as the introduction of European diseases to the New World, long-distance migration and relocation, the influences of the Spanish mission system, the effects of the English plantation system, the northern fur trade of the English, and the French, Dutch, and English trade of Indian slaves and deerskins in the South.This book covers the full geographic and social scope of the Southeast, including the indigenous peoples of Florida, Virginia, Maryland, the Appalachian Mountains, the Carolina Piedmont, the Ohio Valley, and the Central and Lower Mississippi Valleys.Robbie Ethridge is an assistant professor of anthropology and southern studies at the University of Mississippi. Charles Hudson is Franklin Professor of Anthropology and History at the University of Georgia.
Unpaid Annotation
The first two-hundred years of Western civilization in the Americas was a time when fundamental and sometimes catastrophic changes occurred in Native American communities in the South.In The Transformation of the Southeastern Indians, historians, anthropologists, and archaeologists provide perspectives on how this era shaped American Indian society for later generations and how it even affects these communities today.This collection of essays presents the most current scholarship on the social history of the South, identifying and examining the historical forces, trends, and events that were attendant to the formation of the Indians of the colonial South.The essayists discuss how Southeastern Indian culture and society evolved. They focus on such aspects as the introduction of European diseases to the New World, long-distance migration and relocation, the influences of the Spanish mission system, the effects of the English plantation system, the northern fur trade of the English, and theFrench, Dutch, and English trade of Indian slaves and deerskins in the South.This book covers the full geographic and social scope of the Southeast, including the indigenous peoples of Florida, Virginia, Maryland, the Appalachian Mountains, the Carolina Piedmont, the Ohio Valley, and the Central and Lower Mississippi Valleys.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. xi
Aboriginal Population Movements in the Postcontact Southeastp. 3
The Great Southeastern Smallpox Epidemic, 1696-1700: The Region's First Major Epidemic?p. 21
Spanish Missions and the Persistence of Chiefly Powerp. 39
Trouble Coming Southward: Emanations through and from Virginia, 1607-1675p. 65
The Mother of Necessity: Carolina, the Creek Indians, and the Making of a New Order in the American Southeast, 1670-1763p. 79
The Ohio Valley, 1550-1750: Patterns of Sociopolitical Coalescence and Dispersalp. 115
The Cultural Landscape of the North Carolina Piedmont at Contactp. 135
Reconstructing the Coalescence of Cherokee Communities in Southern Appalachiap. 155
From Prehistory through Protohistory to Ethnohistory in and near the Northern Lower Mississippi Valleyp. 177
Colonial Period Transformations in the Mississippi Valley: Disintegration, Alliance, Confederation, Playoffp. 225
Social Changes among the Caddo Indians in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuriesp. 249
Notesp. 271
Bibliographyp. 323
Contributorsp. 361
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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