Catalogue


West to far Michigan : settling the Lower Peninsula, 1815-1860 /
Kenneth E. Lewis.
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2002.
description
xx, 514 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0870135511 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2002.
isbn
0870135511 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4666713
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kenneth E. Lewis is associate professor of anthropology at Michigan State University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2003-11-01:
Lewis (anthropology, Michigan State Univ.) deploys classical geographical perspectives and settlement models in this historical, geographical account of 19th-century settlement in southern Michigan--the interlake peninsula enclosed by lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan, and St. Clair. Geographical concepts from cultural landscape analysis to central place theory provide the structure for a wealth of primary information that portrays the processes of frontier colonization. From 1815 to 1860, migrants from the Northeast moved here, creating "New England extended." They were joined by immigrants from northern Europe, who often settled in covenanted communities. Beginning in the southeast, settlement spread west along Indian trails that often became regional roads. Settlers encountered heavily glaciated lands and selectively occupied the remnant landforms. Clearing and planting the hilly, wooded moraines required high labor investments, as did draining the marshy till plains. Late arrivers often found fertile prairie openings still available if they could assemble the tools and cultivating power required to break the sod. The region's agricultural development prior to the Civil War provided the urban and economic infrastructure on which subsequent expansion was based. Recommended for libraries with regional and Middle West collections. K. B. Raitz University of Kentucky
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2002
Choice, November 2003
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
West to Far Michigan is a study of the lower peninsula's occupation by agriculturalists, whose presence forever transformed the land and helped to create the modern state of Michigan. This is not simply a history of Michigan, but rather a work that focuses on why the state developed as it did. Although Michigan is seen today as an industrial state whose history is couched in terms of the fur trade and the international rivalry for the Great Lakes, agricultural settlement shaped its expansion. Using a model of agricultural colonization derived from comparative studies, Lewis examines the settlement process in Michigan between 1815 and 1860. This period marked the opening of Michigan to immigrants, saw the rise of commercial agriculture, and witnessed Michigan's integration into the larger national economy. Employing numerous primary sources, West to Far Michigan traces changes and patterns of settlement crucial to documenting the large-scale development of southern Michigan as a region. Diaries, letters, memoirs, gazetteers, and legal documents serve to transform the more abstract elements of economic and social change into more human terms. Through the experiences of the early Agriculturists process, we can gain insight into how their triumphs played out in communities within the region to produce small-scale elements that comprise the fabric of the larger cultural landscape.
Unpaid Annotation
West to Far Michigan is a study of the Lower Peninsula's occupation by agriculturalists, whose presence forever transformed the land and helped create the modern state of Michigan. The author's use of numerous primary sources reveals how individual triumphs, as well as setbacks, merged into a larger story chronicling the transformation of a cultural landscape.
Main Description
West to Far Michigan is a study of the lower peninsula's occupation by agriculturalists, whose presence forever transformed the land and helped to create the modern state of Michigan. This is not simply a history of Michigan, but rather a work that focuses on why the state developed as it did. Although Michigan is seen today as an industrial state whose history is couched in terms of the fur trade and the international rivalry for the Great Lakes, agricultural settlement shaped its expansion. Using a model of agricultural colonization derived from comparative studies, Lewis examines the settlement process in Michigan between 1815 and 1860. This period marked the opening of Michigan to immigrants, saw the rise of commercial agriculture, and witnessed Michigan's integration into the larger national economy.Employing numerous primary sources, West to Far Michigan traces changes and patterns of settlement crucial to documenting the large-scale development of southern Michigan as a region. Diaries, letters, memoirs, gazetteers, and legal documents serve to transform the more abstract elements of economic and social change into more human terms. Through the experiences of the early Agriculturists process, we can gain insight into how their triumphs played out in communities within the region to produce small-scale elements that comprise the fabric of the larger cultural landscape
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. xi
List of Tablesp. xv
Abbreviationsp. xvi
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Frontier Studies: An Approach to Michigan's Pastp. 1
Landscapes, Settlement Patterning, and Frontiers
Processes of Frontier Colonization
Settlement Patterning on the Michigan Frontier
Production and Spatial Organization
Transportation and Spatial Patterning
Settlement Patterning and Organization
The Distinctness of Colonization in Southern Michigan
Michigan Before 1815: Prelude to American Settlementp. 13
The European Presence
The Aboriginal Response
Political Change in the Old Northwest
The Pacification of Aboriginal Peoples
A Knowledge of the Regional Landscape
The Entrepot of Detroit
Routes of Access to the Michigan Frontier
The Rise of the Northeast and Western Expansion
The Environmental Context of Colonizationp. 31
The Orientation of Frontier Perspective
The Physical Landscape
Images of the Land: Pioneer Evaluations of Michigan's Environment
Heavy Timbered Lands
Oak Openings
Prairies
Marsh and Swamplands
Pine Lands
Perceptions of Michigan's Climate
Health and Disease in Michigan
The Importance of the Aboriginal Landscape
The Impact of Perception on Settlementp. 71
The Eastern Shore
The Saginaw River Drainage
The St. Joseph River Drainage
The Kalamazoo River Drainage
The Grand River Drainage
The Western Shore
Perceptions and Settlement
The Transfer of Landp. 81
Obtaining Government Possession: The Treaty Process
Michigan Indians and the Cession of Lands
The Eastern Peninsula Groups and the Saginaw-Chippewas
The Potawatomis in the Southwest
The Ottawas on Grand River
The Legal Framework for Land Distribution
The Survey and Distribution of Michigan Lands
The Settlers' Acquisition of Landp. 103
The Cost of Land and Farm-Making
Strategies for Land Acquisition
Speculation and Frontier Development
The Influence of Speculation in Southern Michigan
Squatting and Preemption
Strategies for Settlementp. 127
Motivations for Colonization
Communities of Accretion: An Amalgam of Diversity
Covenanted Communities: Cities upon a Hill
Colonizing Strategies and Settlement Patterning
Michigan's Frontier Economy in 1845p. 153
Initial Adaptations on the Michigan Frontier
Early Pioneer Strategies of Subsistence
The Organization of the Frontier Economy
Population Expansion, Transportation, and Settlement Patterning on the Michigan Frontier, 1845-1860p. 179
Estimating the Expansion of Population
Evidence for Settlement Distribution in Frontier Michigan
The Development of Roads in a Frontier Economy
The Organization of Settlement in the Colonial Economy
The Late Frontier Landscape in Michigan
Long-Distance Transportation and External Tradep. 217
Overland Transport in Expansion and Development
The Erie Canal and the Lake Passage to Michigan
Railroad Expansion and Western Commerce
The Restructuring of Michigan Agriculturep. 235
A Focus on Marketable Crops
Corn, for Food, Feed, and Drink
Wheat, the Market Grain of Choice
Field Crops, Fruit, and Specialty Crops
Dairying and Wool Production
Agricultural Innovations and Improvement
Changes in Agricultural Technology
The Infrastructure of Processing and Settlement Patterning
The Organization of Production and Marketingp. 269
Banking, Credit, and the Expansion of Production
External Exchange in a Frontier Economy
The Railroad, the Elevator, and the Restructuring of Trade
Economic Change and Settlement Patterning
The Consolidation of Settlement and Transportation in a Transitional Economyp. 283
Railroads and Market Expansion
The System of Feeder Roads
Transportation and Settlement Structure in 1860
Exploring Settlement Function
The Landscape of Settlement in Southern Michigan in 1860p. 301
Epiloguep. 311
Appendices
Populations of Michigan Settlements from Censuses, 1854-1864p. 313
Populations of Michigan Settlements from Gazetteer Listings, 1856-1864p. 315
Hierarchical Order of Central Places in Michigan in 1860 Based on Functional Index Valuesp. 321
Endnotesp. 329
Bibliographyp. 443
Indexp. 501
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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