Catalogue


Suburban landscapes : culture and politics in a New York metropolitan community /
Paul H. Mattingly.
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.
description
xi, 333 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0801866804 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001.
isbn
0801866804 (hardcover : alk. paper)
general note
"Published in Cooperation with the Center for American Places."
catalogue key
4663961
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Paul H. Mattingly is a professor of history at New York University
Reviews
Review Quotes
The inclusion of suburban imagery, ideology, and informal and formal organizations provides a significant contribution to suburban history and serves as a model for unraveling the suburban experience.
"The inclusion of suburban imagery, ideology, and informal and formal organizations provides a significant contribution to suburban history and serves as a model for unraveling the suburban experience."--James Borchert, Journal of American History
This book makes several important arguments that add complexity to the suburban historiography,... especially in its nuanced exploration of how a suburban imaginary sprang from local soil but planted itself deeply in the national consciousness.
"This book makes several important arguments that add complexity to the suburban historiography,... especially in its nuanced exploration of how a suburban imaginary sprang from local soil but planted itself deeply in the national consciousness."--Becky Nicolaides, American Historical Review
Mattingly manages the rather neat and absolutely essential trick of keeping broad themes and the richness of local context and detail in view at the same time, shifting effortlessly from one to the other and thus conveying respect for both dimensions.
"Mattingly manages the rather neat and absolutely essential trick of keeping broad themes and the richness of local context and detail in view at the same time, shifting effortlessly from one to the other and thus conveying respect for both dimensions."--Michael H. Frisch, State University of New York, Buffalo
"Paul Mattingly presents a thoroughly researched social history of Leonia that challenges the critique of suburbia as lacking in community... The author's use of artistic images, oral histories, and contemporaneous newspaper accounts are instructive. His frequent focus on personalities is an appealing technique that helps to hold the reader's interest and move the story forward."--Dana Taplin, The Public Historian
Presents readers with an alternative way to understand suburbs as communities in which people live and shape their desires, not merely as places under (sub) a city (urban)... The role of cultural memory in a small community's development and of how politics may be conceptualized through that memory, are both interesting and relatively unexplored avenues for understanding community development. It is this approach that makes Suburban Landscapes a valuable contribution.
"Presents readers with an alternative way to understand suburbs as communities in which people live and shape their desires, not merely as places under (sub) a city (urban)... The role of cultural memory in a small community's development and of how politics may be conceptualized through that memory, are both interesting and relatively unexplored avenues for understanding community development. It is this approach that makes Suburban Landscapes a valuable contribution."--Maureen A. Flanagan, Urban Studies
Paul Mattingly presents a thoroughly researched social history of Leonia that challenges the critique of suburbia as lacking in community... The author's use of artistic images, oral histories, and contemporaneous newspaper accounts are instructive. His frequent focus on personalities is an appealing technique that helps to hold the reader's interest and move the story forward.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
Most Americans today live in the suburbs. Yet suburban voices remain largely unheard in sociological and cultural studies of these same communities. In Suburban Landscapes: Culture and Politics in a New York Metropolitan Community , Paul Mattingly provides a new model for understanding suburban development through his narrative history of Leonia, New Jersey, an early commuter suburb of New York City. Although Leonia is a relatively small suburb, a study of this kind has national significance because most of America's suburbs began as rural communities, with histories that predated the arrival of commuters and real estate developers. Examining the dynamics of community cultural formation, Mattingly contests the prevailing urban and suburban dichotomy. In doing so, he offers a respite from journalistic cliches and scholarly bias about the American suburb, providing instead an insightful, nuanced look at the integrative history of a region. Mattingly examines Leonia's politics and culture through three eras of growth and change (1859-94, 1894-1920, and 1920-60). A major part of Leonia's history, Mattingly reveals, was its role as an attractive community for artists and writers, many contributors to national magazines, who created a 'suburban' aesthetic. The work done by generations of Leonias' artists provides an important vantage and a wonderful set of tools for exploring evolving notions of suburban culture and landscape, which have broad implications and applications. Oral histories, census records, and the extensive work of Leonia's many artists and writers come together to trace not only the community's socially diverse history, but to show how residents viewed the growth and transformation of Leonia as well.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, Paul Mattingly provides a model for understanding suburban development through his narrative history of Leonia, New Jersey, an early commuter suburb of New York City.
Main Description
Most Americans today live in the suburbs. Yet suburban voices remain largely unheard in sociological and cultural studies of these same communities. In Suburban Landscapes: Culture and Politics in a New York Metropolitan Community, Paul Mattingly provides a new model for understanding suburban development through his narrative history of Leonia, New Jersey, an early commuter suburb of New York City. Although Leonia is a relatively small suburb, a study of this kind has national significance because most of America's suburbs began as rural communities, with histories that predated the arrival of commuters and real estate developers. Examining the dynamics of community cultural formation, Mattingly contests the prevailing urban and suburban dichotomy. In doing so, he offers a respite from journalistic cliches and scholarly bias about the American suburb, providing instead an insightful, nuanced look at the integrative history of a region. Mattingly examines Leonia's politics and culture through three eras of growth and change (1859-94, 1894-1920, and 1920-60). A major part of Leonia's history, Mattingly reveals, was its role as an attractive community for artists and writers, many contributors to national magazines, who created a 'suburban' aesthetic. The work done by generations of Leonias' artists provides an important vantage and a wonderful set of tools for exploring evolving notions of suburban culture and landscape, which have broad implications and applications. Oral histories, census records, and the extensive work of Leonia's many artists and writers come together to trace not only the community's socially diverse history, but to show how residents viewed the growth and transformation of Leonia as well.
Table of Contents
Suburban Landscapes: Culture and Politics in a New York Metropolitan Community
Introductionp. 1
Dutchness and the English Neighborhoodp. 34
The Village as as Voluntary Organizationp. 64
Village Landscapesp. 108
The Trolley Produces a Country Townp. 145
Country Landscapes, Bohemian Cityp. 205
The Middle-Class Zonep. 252
The Political Culture of Suburban Professionalsp. 292
The Ideology of the Civic Conferencep. 327
The Modernization of Suburban Memoryp. 384
Recovering Suburban Memoryp. 434
Epilogue
Appendices
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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