Catalogue


The abolition of serfdom in Russia, 1762-1907 /
David Moon.
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
description
xix, 203 p., 8 p. of plates : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
058229486X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow, England ; New York : Longman, 2001.
isbn
058229486X
abstract
In 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the insitution of serfdom in Russia. This book traces the origins of the abolition back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907.
catalogue key
4663324
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 182-191) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
It was in February 1861 that Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the institution of serfdom in Russia. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II in time undid the ties that bound 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners. Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process. It traces the origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, the book provides : an up-to-date interpretation of this important development in Russian history, drawing on recent research by Russian and Western historians a document section containing selections from sources previously unavailable in English translation a glossary of specialist terms, a chronology of the main events, a who's who identifying the main people and a guide to further reading The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia shows how the reform process linked the old social, economic and political order of eighteenth-century Russia with the radical transformations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that culminated in revolution in 1917. It will be invaluable for students and teachers of courses on the history of Russia, Europe and rural societies. David Moon is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.
Back Cover Copy
It was in February 1861 that Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the institution of serfdom in Russia. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II in time undid the ties that bound 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners. Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia  presents the reform as a process. It traces the origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, the book provides : an up-to-date interpretation of this important development in Russian history, drawing on recent research by Russian and Western historians a document section containing selections from sources previously unavailable in English translation a glossary of specialist terms, a chronology of the main events, a who's who identifying the main people and a guide to further reading The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia  shows how the reform process linked the old social, economic and political order of eighteenth-century Russia with the radical transformations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that culminated in revolution in 1917. It will be invaluable for students and teachers of courses on the history of Russia, Europe and rural societies. David Moon is Reader in Modern History at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow.  
Bowker Data Service Summary
In 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the insitution of serfdom in Russia. This book traces the origins of the abolition back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907.
Long Description
In February 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the institution of serfdom in Russia. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II undid the ties that bound together 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners, and changed the face of Russia. Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia presents the reform as a process. It traces the origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, the book shows how the reform process linked the old social, economic and political order of eighteenth-century Russia with the radical transformations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that culminated in revolution in 1917.
Main Description
In February 1861 Tsar Alexander II issued the statutes abolishing the institution of serfdom in Russia. The procedures set in motion by Alexander II undid the ties that bound together 22 million serfs and 100,000 noble estate owners, and changed the face of Russia.   Rather than presenting abolition as an 'event' that happened in February 1861, The Abolition of Serfdom in Russia  presents the reform as a process. It traces the origins of the abolition of serfdom back to reforms in related areas in 1762 and forward to the culmination of the process in 1907. Written in an engaging and accessible manner, the book shows how the reform process linked the old social, economic and political order of eighteenth-century Russia with the radical transformations of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that culminated in revolution in 1917.
Table of Contents
List of Table and Map
Introduction to the Series
Note on Translations
Author's Acknowledgements
Publisher's Acknowledgements
Chronology
Map
Background
Introduction
Historians and the Abolition of Serfdom
The Structure of the Book
Analysis
Serfdom In The Russian Empire
The Russian State, the Nobility and Serfdom
Serfdom in the Western Borderlands of the Russian Empire
Noble Estates and the Peasant Villanges
Conclusion
A Crisis Of Serfdom? An Economic Crisis? 'The Peasant Movement.' Conclusion
Further Causes Of Reform And Abolition
Humanitarian Considerations
State Interests
Relations between the State and Nobility
The Decembrist Revolt
Conclusion
Rural Reforms, 1762-1855
Catherine the Great, the Nobility and Serfdom
Protection
Limited Reforms of Serfdom in Russia, 1801-48
Reforms of Serfdom in the Western Borderlands
Reforms of the Appanage and State Peasants
Conclusion
Military Reform And The Crimean War
The Need for Military Reform
Military Settlements
Indefinite Leave and the Creation of Reserves
The Crimean War, 1853-56
From Defeat to Reform
Conclusion
Preparing To Abolish Serfdom, 1856-61
Tentative First Steps
The Government's First Programme
The Provincial Committees of Noble Estate Owners
The Government's Second Programme
The Editing Commissions
Final Hurdles
The Terms of The Abolition Of Serfdom
The Statues on the Abolition of Serfdom
The Two-Year Transitional Period
Temporary Obligation
The Redemption Operation
The Proclamation on the Abolition of Serfdom
Conclusion
Responses And Implementation, 1861-63
The Tsar, his Brother and the Government
The Intelligentsia
The Nobility
The Peasantry
Implementation
Popular Monarchism
Conclusion
The Reform Process, 1863-1907
Temporary Obligation
The Redemption Operation
The End of the Reform Process
Comparisons
Conclusion
The Impact Of The Abolition Of Serfdom
The Wider Context
Estate Owner-Peasant Relations
Peasant Agriculture
Peasant Living Standards
The Position of the Nobility
Public Opinion
Conclusion
Conclusions And Assessments
Abolition and Aftermath
Document
Who's Who
Guide to Further Reading
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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