Catalogue


Dr. J.G.M. Ramsey : autobiography and letters /
J.G.M. Ramsey ; edited by William B. Hesseltine ; with an introduction by Robert Tracy McKenzie.
imprint
Knoxville, TN : University of Tennessee Press, 2002.
description
xxxviii, 367 p.
ISBN
1572331739 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Knoxville, TN : University of Tennessee Press, 2002.
isbn
1572331739 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
4660614
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
The Editor: William B. Hesseltine (1902-1963) was a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin. His books included The Rise and Fall of Third Parties, Civil War Prisons, and Ulysses S. Grant, Politician. Robert Tracy McKenzie is associate professor of history at the University of Washington. He is author of One South or Many? Plantation Belt and Upcountry in Civil War-Era Tennessee.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2002
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Born in 1796, James Gettys McGready Ramsey was a man of broad talents who left a permanent imprint on Tennessee. He was a physician, public servant, religious leader, banker, railroad advocate, and tireless scholar of early Tennessee history. A states-rights Democrat, he enthusiastically supported secession in 1861 and later served the Confederacy as a treasury agent and field surgeon. But East Tennessee was deeply divided over the war, and many in his native Knoxville viii fled Ramsey for his secessionist stance. He fled Tennessee in 1863, living in virtual exile in Georgia and North Carolina before returning to Knoxville in 1872.Written in the 1870s and originally published by the Tennessee Historical Commission in 1954, Ramsey's autobiography focuses mainly on the home front during the war years. Although Ramsey left Knoxville before Union troops arrived, his wife and daughters remained there for some time, reporting to him on life under the occupation. After the war, Ramsey remained largely unreconstructed politically. Still devoted to his state, he continued his work with the East Tennessee Historical Society, which he had founded in 1834, and served as president of the Tennessee Historical Society from 1874 until his death in 1884.The book includes selected letters from both before and after the Civil War. These shed light on several aspects of Tennessee history, including the coming of the railroad (a project in which Ramsey was instrumental), as well as on Ramsey's personal conviction that slavery was a beneficial institution that lay at the heart of the secession crisis.
Main Description
Born in 1796, James Gettys McGready Ramsey was a man of broad talents who left a permanent imprint on Tennessee. He was a physician, public servant, religious leader, banker, railroad advocate, and tireless scholar of early Tennessee history. A states-rights Democrat, he enthusiastically supported secession in 1861 and later served the Confederacy as a treasury agent and field surgeon. But East Tennessee was deeply divided over the war, and many in his native Knoxville vilified Ramsey for his secessionist stance. He fled Tennessee in 1863, living in virtual exile in Georgia and North Carolina before returning to Knoxville in 1872. Written in the 1870s and originally published by the Tennessee Historical Commission in 1954, Ramsey's autobiography focuses mainly on the home front during the war years. Although Ramsey left Knoxville before Union troops arrived, his wife and daughters remained there for some time, reporting to him on life under the occupation. After the war, Ramsey remained largely unreconstructed politically. Still devoted to his state, he continued his work with the East Tennessee Historical Society, which he had founded in 1834, and served as president of the Tennessee Historical Society from 1874 until his death in 1884. The book includes selected letters from both before and after the Civil War. These shed light on several aspects of Tennessee history, including the coming of the railroad (a project in which Ramsey was instrumental), as well as on Ramsey's personal conviction that slavery was a beneficial institution that lay at the heart of the secession crisis. The Editor: William B. Hesseltine (19021963) was a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin. His books included The Rise and Fall of Third Parties, Civil War Prisons, and Ulysses S. Grant, Politician. Robert Tracy McKenzie is associate professor of history at the University of Washington. He is author of One South or Many?: Plantation Belt and Upcountry in Civil War-Era Tennessee.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. vii
Introductionp. xi
Prefacep. xxix
Heritage and Youthp. 1
Mecklenburg Politicsp. 17
Banking and Internal Improvementsp. 33
Intellectual Improvementsp. 46
Annals of Tennessee: Letters of a Historianp. 57
Industrial Necessities of the Southp. 83
A Confederate Bankerp. 98
First Raid on East Tennesseep. 106
Buckner's Tripp. 113
Captain Robert M. Ramseyp. 125
Other Sons and a Cousinp. 134
Longstreet in Knoxvillep. 144
Rebel Ladiesp. 158
The Lost Riflep. 182
Misfortunes and Bereavementsp. 187
Some Atrocities and Some Adjustmentsp. 208
Exile's Retreatp. 220
Yankee Prisonsp. 236
Return to Knoxvillep. 246
A Return to Historyp. 256
Men of Mecklenburgp. 278
Pioneers of Tennesseep. 292
Interests of an Octogenarianp. 308
King's Mountain Menp. 323
Indexp. 347
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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