Catalogue


Professional women at work : interactions, tacit understandings, and the non-trivial nature of trivia in bureaucratic settings /
Jerry Jacobs.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Bergin & Garvey, 1994.
description
viii, 144 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0897893808 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Bergin & Garvey, 1994.
isbn
0897893808 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
465776
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [137]-141) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1994-12:
Jacobs's study is a qualitative assessment of how routine, largely ignored aspects of work (what the author calls "trivia") affect the work experience. The opening two chapters present Jacobs's argument that sociology's partiality for quantitative analyses has led to the neglect of a central aspect of work: the routine, or trivial nature of the work process itself. Five of eight chapters are devoted to analyses of open-ended interview data with five professional women. Particular attention is paid to these women's career paths, career development, social interaction, burnout, and strategies for coping with and/or resisting the bureaucratic characteristics of work. While successful at providing a rich description of the work experience, this book does little to link these particular women's experiences to important theoretical, conceptual, and public policy issues that are being addressed elsewhere in the literature on women's employment. Nevertheless, this monograph provides a convincing argument for the need for qualitative analyses of the taken-for-granted characteristics of work. Advanced undergraduate; graduate. S. K. Gallagher; Oregon State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'œJacobs offers Professional Women at Work as one way to increase the number of studies offering "rich description of work and the work experience."'' Social Forces 74:2
'œJacob's study is a qualitative assessment of how routine, largely ignored aspects of work affect the work experience. This monograph provides a convincing argument for the need for qualitative analyses of the taken-for-granted characteristics of work. Advanced undergraduate; graduate.'' Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 1994
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Summaries
Long Description
This book looks at the routine taken-for-granted features of work as experienced by professional women in bureaucratic environments. It shows why these trivial features are not trivial, but add up to a good part of what all work is composed of. Finally, it considers why the women interviewed in this study encountered and experienced their professional careers in the ways they did. There are many books on the general subject of women at work and the sociology of work, but few deal with what the work consists of, how it is accomplished, what one needs to know to undertake it competently, and how it is experienced by the worker. This book deals with all these issues, and more, that are typically overlooked in the literature on women at work in particular and on work in general.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Qualitative and Quantitative Studies of Work
Some Essential Differences Understanding Work and Workers
A Respect for Trivia and the Need for Rich Description and Subjective Assessments Office Work
Publication Coordinator Good Work and Bad Jobs
Principal Administrative Analyst God Bless the Children
Educator and Child Care Administrator God Help the Needy
HIV Clinic Director Public vs. Private Practice
Clinical Psychologist
Summary and Conclusions
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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