Catalogue


Shenoute & the women of the White Monastery : Egyptian monasticism in late antiquity /
Rebecca Krawiec.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
description
xii, 248 p.
ISBN
0195129431 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 2002.
isbn
0195129431 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4651303
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
... a compelling analysis of the interrelations between power and gender in a particular monastic community in Egypt in Late Antiquity ... very well argued ... full of interesting details.
"A work of painstaking historical reconstruciton, this book also offers asophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gendershaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is thedeft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuablecontribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."--American Benedictine Review
"A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers a sophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gender shaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is the deft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such avaluable contribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."-- American Benedictine Review
"A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers asophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gendershaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is thedeft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuablecontribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."--American Benedictine Review
Krawiec's book is a fascinating and well-written study and a valuable contribution to the several lines of research at the intersection of which her subject is located: Patristics, Gender Studies and the social and religious history of the Mediterranean world in Late Antiquity. Profiting from recent research on the literary and rhetorical analysis of patristic texts, she manages to glean a wealth of information from her reluctant sources.
"This important book....should significantly influence the study of monasticism in late antiquity."--History: Reviews of New Books
"This important book....should significantly influence the study ofmonasticism in late antiquity."--History: Reviews of New Books
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study of Egyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."--Religious Studies Review
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study ofEgyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."--Religious StudiesReview
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study of Egyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."--Religious Studies Review "A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers a sophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gender shaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is the deft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuable contribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."-- American Benedictine Review "Superior work...one of the best discussions of monastic life and its nuances that I have seen."--David Frankfurter, University of New Hampshire, Author of Religion in Roman Egypt "Under the long tenure of its abbot Shenoute (385-465), the White Monastery grew to become one of the most important centers of monasticism in ancient Egypt, including several thousand monks, both male and female. Yet this dynamic and controversial leader and his many followers remain poorly known and misunderstood among contemporary historians. Rebecca Krawiec's outstanding book gives us intimate access to a community of vibrant ascetic women chafing under the leadership of a stern and irascible man. Making use of newly recovered and untranslated Coptic sources, Krawiec shows how conflicts and negotiations over everyday issues like food and clothing constructed monastic authority, holy space, gender, and family. This gracefully written study will appeal to readers interested in early Christianity, monasticism, late antiquity, and gender studies."--David Brakke, Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University, Author of Athanasius and the Politics of Asceticism
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study of Egyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."-- Religious Studies Review "A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers a sophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gender shaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is the deft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuable contribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."-- American Benedictine Review "Superior work...one of the best discussions of monastic life and its nuances that I have seen."--David Frankfurter, University of New Hampshire, Author of Religion in Roman Egypt "Under the long tenure of its abbot Shenoute (385-465), the White Monastery grew to become one of the most important centers of monasticism in ancient Egypt, including several thousand monks, both male and female. Yet this dynamic and controversial leader and his many followers remain poorly known and misunderstood among contemporary historians. Rebecca Krawiec's outstanding book gives us intimate access to a community of vibrant ascetic women chafing under the leadership of a stern and irascible man. Making use of newly recovered and untranslated Coptic sources, Krawiec shows how conflicts and negotiations over everyday issues like food and clothing constructed monastic authority, holy space, gender, and family. This gracefully written study will appeal to readers interested in early Christianity, monasticism, late antiquity, and gender studies."--David Brakke, Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University, Author of Athanasius and the Politics of Asceticism
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study of Egyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."--Religious Studies Review "A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers a sophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gender shaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is the deft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuable contribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."--American Benedictine Review "Superior work...one of the best discussions of monastic life and its nuances that I have seen."--David Frankfurter, University of New Hampshire, Author ofReligion in Roman Egypt "Under the long tenure of its abbot Shenoute (385-465), the White Monastery grew to become one of the most important centers of monasticism in ancient Egypt, including several thousand monks, both male and female. Yet this dynamic and controversial leader and his many followers remain poorly known and misunderstood among contemporary historians. Rebecca Krawiec's outstanding book gives us intimate access to a community of vibrant ascetic women chafing under the leadership of a stern and irascible man. Making use of newly recovered and untranslated Coptic sources, Krawiec shows how conflicts and negotiations over everyday issues like food and clothing constructed monastic authority, holy space, gender, and family. This gracefully written study will appeal to readers interested in early Christianity, monasticism, late antiquity, and gender studies."--David Brakke, Department of Religious Studies, Indiana University, Author ofAthanasius and the Politics of Asceticism
Abbreviations Introdution 1. Daily Life in the White Monastery under Shenoute 2. Women's Life in the White Monastery under Shenoute 3. Shenoute's Discourse of Monastic Power 4. Acceptance and Resistance: The Women's Power 5. "They too are Our Brethren": Gender in the White Monastery 6. Gender and Monasticism in Late Antiquity 7. Women's Role in the Monastic Family: The Intersection of Power and Gender 8. "According to the Flesh": Biological Kin in the White Monastery Notes Bibliography Index
"This well-written book is an important contribution to the study of Egyptian monasticism and Egyptian church history."--Religious Studies Review"A work of painstaking historical reconstruction, this book also offers a sophisticated and original theoretical reading of the way power and gender shaped the life of a particular early Christian monastic community. It is the deft weaving of these two perspectives that makes this work such a valuable contribution to our emerging understanding of ancient Christian monasticism."-- American Benedictine Review"This important book....should significantly influence the study of monasticism in late antiquity."--History: Reviews of New Books
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This book depicts the lives of female monks within a monastery located in upper Egypt in the period 385-464 CE.
Long Description
This book depicts the lives of female monks within a monastery located in upper Egypt in the period 385-464 CE. During this period the monastery was headed by a monk named Shenoute; twelve of his letters to the women under his care survive. Despite various technical textual difficulties, Krawiec is able to use the letters to reconstruct a series of quarrels and events in the life of the White Monastery and to discern some of the key patterns in the participants' relationships to one another within the world as they perceived it. She begins by describing the monks' daily routine and discovers that the monastery's culture was based on uniformity, in both material goods and emotional support, for all the monks, regardless of background. The female monks' relationship with Shenoute constructed and exerted his authority in these conditions, and investigates the degree to which the women accepted it.
Main Description
Piecing together the fragmentary writings of Shenoute, a monk who headed the White Monestary, Krawiec depicts the relationships, events, quarrels, and patterns in the lives of the female monks under his care.
Main Description
This book depicts the lives of female monks within a monastery located in upper Egypt in the period 385-464 CE. During this period, the monastery was headed by a monk named Shenoute; thirteen of his letters to the women under his care survive. These writings are fragmentary, only partiallytranslated, little studied, and written in difficult-to-decipher Coptic. Despite these problems, Krawiec has used the letters to reconstruct a series of quarrels and events in the life of the White Monastery and to discern some of the key patterns in the participants' relationships to one anotherwithin the world as they perceived it.
Main Description
This book depicts the lives of female monks within a monastery located in upper Egypt in the period 385-464 CE. During this period, the monastery was headed by a monk named Shenoute; thirteen of his letters to the women under his care survive. These writings are fragmentary, only partially translated, little studied, and written in difficult-to-decipher Coptic. Despite these problems, Krawiec has used the letters to reconstruct a series of quarrels and events in the life of the White Monastery and to discern some of the key patterns in the participants' relationships to one another within the world as they perceived it.
Main Description
This volume depicts the lives of female monks within a monastery locatedin upper Egypt in the period 385-464 CE. During this period the monastery washeaded by a monk named Shenoute; twelve of his letters to the women under hiscare survive. Krawiec here uses the letters to reconstruct a series of quarrelsand events in the life of the White Monastery and to discern some of the keypatterns in the participants' relationships to one another within the world asthey perceived it. Krawiec examines how Shenoute constructed and exerted hisauthority in these conditions, and investigates the degree to which the womenaccepted it.

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