Catalogue


Sacraments, ceremonies and the Stuart divines : sacramental theology and liturgy in England and Scotland, 1603-1662 /
Bryan D. Spinks.
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., c2002.
description
xiv, 240 p. : ill.
ISBN
0754614751
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate Pub., c2002.
isbn
0754614751
catalogue key
4644199
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 221-25) and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
This book surveys developments in sacramental and liturgical discourse and discord, exploring the writings of English and Scottish divines, and focusing on baptism and the Lord's Supper. The reigns of James I and Charles I coincided with divergence and development in teaching on the sacraments in England and Scotland and with growing discord on liturgical texts and the ceremonial. Uniquely focusing on both nations in a single study, Bryan Spinks draws on theological treatises, sermons, catechisms, liturgical texts and writings by Scottish theologians hitherto neglected.Exploring the European roots of the churches of England and Scotland and how they became entwined in developments culminating in the Solemn League and Covenant and Westminster Directory, this book presents an authoritative study of sacramental and liturgical debate, developments, and experiments during the Stuart period.
Main Description
This book surveys developments in sacramental and liturgical discourse and discord, exploring the writings of English and Scottish divines, and focusing on baptism and the Lord's Supper. The reigns of James I and Charles I coincided with divergence and development in teaching on the sacraments in England and Scotland and with growing discord on liturgical texts and the ceremonial. Uniquely focusing on both nations in a single study, Bryan Spinks draws on theological treatises, sermons, catechisms, liturgical texts and writings by Scottish theologians hitherto neglected. Exploring the European roots of the churches of England and Scotland and how they became entwined in developments culminating in the Solemn League and Covenant and Westminster Directory, this book presents an authoritative study of sacramental and liturgical debate, developments, and experiments during the Stuart period.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
The Sacramental Legacy of the Sixteenth-Century Reformationp. 1
Lex Ritualis, Lex Credendi? From Hampton Court to the Five Articles of Perthp. 33
The Development of Conformist Calvinist and Patristic Reformed 'Sacramentalism', and the Sacramental Rites of the 1637 Scottish Book of Common Prayerp. 69
From the Long Parliament to the Death of Cromwellp. 113
Kingdoms and Churches Apart: The Restorationp. 147
After-Thoughtsp. 171
Appendices
Communion Chalices, England and Scotlandp. 183
Communion Prayers from John Downame's A Guide to Godlynesse, 1622p. 185
Sacramental Rites from the Second Draft Scottish Liturgy by William Cowper, Edinburgh, 1618p. 191
Sacrament Chart, from John Denison's The Heavenly Banquet, 1631p. 199
Zacharie Boyd's Communion Watch-Word, 1629p. 201
William Guild's Communion Sermon, 'The Christians Passover', 1639p. 205
Bibliographyp. 221
Indexp. 237
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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