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Another's country : archaeological and historical perspectives on cultural interactions in the southern colonies /
edited by J.W. Joseph and Martha Zierden ; foreword by Julia A. King.
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2002.
description
xvii, 282 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0817311297 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2002.
isbn
0817311297 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
4643337
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2002-10-01:
Scholars long have recognized the cultural mix of Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans along the expanding frontier of the 18th-century South. These 14 essays draw on historical and archaeological evidence to underscore new levels of ethnic diversity, complexity, and syncretism in the southern colonies. As various ethnic groups met, clashed, and intermingled, their cultures adapted, interacted, and became transformed into creolized societies. French settlers in South Carolina, for example, introduced trench-set post architecture. Moravians in North Carolina formed a nucleated town. In New Windsor, South Carolina, German-Swiss settlers shaped their economy along an English mercantile model. Throughout the South, German speakers organized their communities around their various religious beliefs. The authors concur that because frontier physical, social, and cultural boundaries remained in constant flux, and because dominant groups often imposed a kind of cultural hegemony, conclusions based on archaeological remains and material culture must be tentative at best. Still, they make a strong case for the interactive nature of adaptation and creolization. While these essays provide interesting and important details on individual communities, they nevertheless fall short of defining a collective southern cultural identity. For upper-division college and university collections. J. D. Smith North Carolina State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
" Another's Country offers thoughtful, innovative perspectives on the cultural and ethnic diversity of life in the southern British colonies. This is top-notch, finely written historical archaeology presented by a group of leading scholars in the field." --Gregory Waselkov, University of South Alabama
" Another's Country offers thoughtful, innovative perspectives on the cultural and ethnic diversity of life in the southern British colonies. This is top-notch, finely written historical archaeology presented by a group of leading scholars in the field." -Gregory Waselkov, University of South Alabama
"These 14 essays draw on historical and archaeological evidence to underscore new levels of ethnic diversity, complexity, and syncretism in the southern colonies." - Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2002
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Summaries
Main Description
The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slaves-all of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures. The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of that era and the Confederacy that sprang from it have become the enduring identities of the South. A full understanding of southern history is not possible, however, without first understanding the intermingling and interactions of the region's 18th-century settlers. In the essays collected here, some of the South's leading historical archaeologists examine various aspects of the colonial experience, attempting to understand how cultural identity was expressed, why cultural diversity was eventually replaced by a common identity, and how the various cultures intermeshed. Written in accessible language, this book will be valuable to archaeologists and non-archaeologists alike. Cultural, architectural, and military historians, cultural anthropologists, geographers, genealogists, and others interested in the cultural legacy of the South will find much of value in this book. Additional reviews: In the Southeast, where the written record goes back five hundred years, historical archaeology is a subdivision of history as well as anthropology, for the compleat historical archaeologist mines all sources. The contributors to this volume on the colonial Carolinas and Georgia ask historical questions, provide ample historical contexts, and present their findings in the common language of scholarship.- The Journal of Southern History
Main Description
The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slaves'"all of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures.The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of that era and the Confederacy that sprang from it have become the enduring identities of the South. A full understanding of southern history is not possible, however, without first understanding the intermingling and interactions of the region's 18th-century settlers. In the essays collected here, some of the South's leading historical archaeologists examine various aspects of the colonial experience, attempting to understand how cultural identity was expressed, why cultural diversity was eventually replaced by a common identity, and how the various cultures intermeshed.Written in accessible language, this book will be valuable to archaeologists and non-archaeologists alike. Cultural, architectural, and military historians, cultural anthropologists, geographers, genealogists, and others interested in the cultural legacy of the South will find much of value in this book.Additional reviews:In the Southeast, where the written record goes back five hundred years, historical archaeology is a subdivision of history as well as anthropology, for the compleat historical archaeologist mines all sources. The contributors to this volume on the colonial Carolinas and Georgia ask historical questions, provide ample historical contexts, and present their findings in the common language of scholarship.'"The Journal of Southern History
Main Description
The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slavesall of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures. The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of that era and the Confederacy that sprang from it have become the enduring identities of the South. A full understanding of southern history is not possible, however, without first understanding the intermingling and interactions of the region's 18th-century settlers. In the essays collected here, some of the South's leading historical archaeologists examine various aspects of the colonial experience, attempting to understand how cultural identity was expressed, why cultural diversity was eventually replaced by a common identity, and how the various cultures intermeshed. Written in accessible language, this book will be valuable to archaeologists and non-archaeologists alike. Cultural, architectural, and military historians, cultural anthropologists, geographers, genealogists, and others interested in the cultural legacy of the South will find much of value in this book. Additional reviews: In the Southeast, where the written record goes back five hundred years, historical archaeology is a subdivision of history as well as anthropology, for the compleat historical archaeologist mines all sources. The contributors to this volume on the colonial Carolinas and Georgia ask historical questions, provide ample historical contexts, and present their findings in the common language of scholarship. The Journal of Southern History
Publisher Fact Sheet
In this innovative work, leading historical archaeologists offer & engaging look at the rise & fall of cultural diversity in the colonial South & its role in shaping a distinct southern identity.
Unpaid Annotation
The 18th-century South was a true melting pot, bringing together colonists from England, France, Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, and other locations, in addition to African slaves -- all of whom shared in the experiences of adapting to a new environment and interacting with American Indians. The shared process of immigration, adaptation, and creolization resulted in a rich and diverse historic mosaic of cultures.The cultural encounters of these groups of settlers would ultimately define the meaning of life in the 19th-century South. The much-studied plantation society of that era and the Confederacy that sprang from it have become the enduring identities of the South. A full understanding of southern history is not possible, however, without first understanding the intermingling and interactions of the region's 18th-century settlers. In the essays collected here, some of the South's leading historical archaeologists examine various aspects of the colonial experience, attempting to understand how cultural identity was expressed, why cultural diversity was eventually replaced by a common identity, and how the various cultures intermeshed.Written in accessible language, this book will be valuable to archaeologists and non-archaeologists alike. Cultural, architectural, and military historians, cultural anthropologists, geographers, genealogists, and others interested in the cultural legacy of the South will find much of value in this book.
Table of Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword
Cultural Diversity in the Southern Coloniesp. 1
The Yamasee in South Carolina: Native American Adaptation and Interaction along the Carolina Frontierp. 13
Colonial African American Plantation Villagesp. 30
Tangible Interaction: Evidence from Stobo Plantationp. 45
A Pattern of Living: A View of the African American Slave Experience in the Pine Forests of the Lower Cape Fearp. 65
Guten Tag Bubba: Germans in the Colonial Southp. 79
An Open-Country Neighborhood in the Southern Colonial Backcountryp. 93
Bethania: A Colonial Moravian Adaptationp. 111
Frenchmen and Africans in South Carolina: Cultural Interaction on the Eighteenth-Century Frontierp. 133
John de la Howe and the Second Wave of French Refugees in the South Carolina Colony: Defining, Maintaining, and Losing Ethnicity on the Passing Frontierp. 145
Anglicans and Dissenters in the Colonial Village of Dorchesterp. 161
Frontier Society in South Carolina: An Example from Willtown (1690-1800)p. 181
"As regular and formidable as any such work in America": The Walled City of Charles Townp. 198
From Colonist to Charlestonian: The Crafting of Identity in a Colonial Southern Cityp. 215
Bibliographyp. 235
Contributorsp. 267
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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