Catalogue


Green : a novel /
Benjamin Zucker.
imprint
New York : Overlook Press, 2002.
description
vii, 247 p. : ill. (some col.).
ISBN
1585671746
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Overlook Press, 2002.
isbn
1585671746
catalogue key
4640717
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2002-06-15:
Green continues the story that began with Zucker's previous novel, Blue, about a New York gem merchant named Abraham Tal who offers advice to friends and family from his shop in Greenwich Village. Here Abraham guides Raphael Fisher, a young writer unable to make up his mind about a relationship, as he takes on a series of artistic and spiritual endeavors. Like its predecessor, Green combines an ingenious use of graphics and layout (each page is faced with color reproductions of, for example, Czanne and Vermeer paintings, as well as images of jewels and calligraphy) with an exuberant intersection of voices that jostle one another across the pages. The novel is laid out in a manner similar to the Talmud, with a main narrative passage occupying a block in the center of the page and surrounded on all sides by passages from other authors, among them Bob Dylan and Marcel Proust as well as Abraham's own ancestors, who offer their commentary on the story as it develops. This beautifully produced and inventive second novel by Zucker, himself a New York gem merchant, is recommended for all literary collections. Philip Santo, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York Short Stories (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2002-04-15:
Picking up where he left off in the remarkable Blue, Zucker once again mixes art, history and narrative to examine the fate of a young Jewish man in New York. Using the same Talmudic style, in which the main story is placed in the center of the page and surrounded by blocks of running commentary, Zucker introduces the plight of Raphael Fisher, a writer at Time Inc., who finds himself unable to make a decision abut his relationship with Dosha Jerusha. Fisher's confidant is the same gadfly gem dealer who starred in Blue, Abraham Tal: he steers Fisher in a variety of philosophical and artistic directions for guidance as the writer pens the proposal for Green and tries to get some attention for the project from Time mogul Henry Luce. The inevitable movement toward the wedding is almost an afterthought as Fisher journeys along his unique path, accompanied by real and imagined commentary from the likes of Fisher's parents, Vermeer, Bob Dylan and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Given the ambitious but somewhat fragmented concept, the beauty of Zucker's book will rest in the eye of the beholder: fiction fans who prefer a straightforward narrative will tend to see it as a coffee-table art book containing a rather disjointed story, while art devotees looking for something more than a coffee-table book should be entertained by the inventive combination of gorgeous visuals and intriguing commentary. 112 full-color and b&w illustrations. (May 1) Forecast: Fans of the well-received Blue are the most obvious audience here, though this oversized, handsome title will definitely catch the eyes of browsers. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews, April 2002
Publishers Weekly, April 2002
Booklist, May 2002
Library Journal, June 2002
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Benjamin Zucker returns to the multi-faceted story of gem dealer Abraham Tal, who he introduced in the novel, 'Blue'. Tal's mind becomes even more crowded with voices from the past and present.
Publisher Fact Sheet
When it was published last year, The New York Times Book Review hailed Blue as "at once a spiritual challenge & a gorgeous typographical object." With Green Benjamin Zucker continues the challenge & the story of Abraham Tal, New York gem merchant & advice-giver to friends & neighbors in Greenwich Village. And continuing, too, is the involving rich world of prismatic color Tal inhabits. His life may be outwardly unexceptional, but he has inherited of world of "voices" jostling one another for their say, their Talmudic commentary on the action. Borges, Breton, Monet, Melville, Elihu Yale, Shah Jahan, Jewish mystics, many others--all will be heard, emphatically, insistently, across the ages--crowding into Tal's "advice shop" on Hudson Street with news, with reports, with something important to say to Tal, & to us. Each page of text is, once again, complemented by art--a color photograph, a painting, an illustration--that provides additional levels to the story. The result is a multifaceted novel that can be both read & re-experienced in an expanding variety of ways.
Unpaid Annotation
The New York Times Book Review hailed Benjamin Zucker's multifaceted novel Blue as "at once a spiritual challenge and a gorgeous typographical object" and Green continues the brilliant and beautiful story of Abraham Tal, New York gem merchant and advice-giver in Greenwich Village. As in Blue, a rich world of color and voices are united to provide comment, in Talmudic style, on the action. Borges, Breton, Monet, Melville, Elihu Yale, Shah Jahan, Jewish mystics, and others are heard, and each page of text is complemented by art-photographs, paintings, illustrations-that provides additional levels to the story. The result is a multifaceted novel that can be both read and re-experienced in an expanding variety of ways.
Unpaid Annotation
When it was published last year, The New York Times Book Review hailed Blue as "at once a spiritual challenge and a gorgeous typographical object". With Green Benjamin Zucker continues the challenge and the story of Abraham Tal, New York gem merchant and advice-giver to friends and neighbors in Greenwich Village.And continuing, too, is the involving rich world of prismatic color Tal inhabits. His life may be outwardly unexceptional, but he has inherited of world of "voices" jostling one another for their say, their Talmudic commentary on the action. Borges, Breton, Monet, Melville, Elihu Yale, Shah Jahan, Jewish mystics, many others -- all will be heard, emphatically, insistently, across the ages -- crowding into Tal's "advice shop" on Hudson Street with news, with reports, with something important to say to Tal, and to us.Each page of text is, once again, complemented by art -- a color photograph, a painting, an illustration -- that provides additional levels to the story. The result is a multifaceted novel that can be both read and re-experienced in an expanding variety of ways.

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